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  1. #161  
    Woo! Lets fix all our problems with software! Oh, wait, there's a bug and 20 planes just crashed, whoops?

    We need a stationary system anyways for things like that, might as well get it out of the way now, rather than later when people die because of our lack of action.
    Down with the BourgeoisOS oppressors, webOS users unite!
  2. #162  
    Quote Originally Posted by Unclevanya View Post


    Polar Geostationary Orbits are possible - what do you mean?
    I beg your pardon?

    Now I'm

    Geostationary orbits work by matching the orbit speed to the rotation of the earth. One orbit of the satellite has to exaclty match (and be in the same direction as) the earth's rotation (i.e. 24 hours). If the direction of that orbit is not directly over the equator then the satellite will be moving relative to the surface so it can't be over the pole, or anywhere else for that matter.
  3. #163  
    And that's where you're messing up. You just have to have a satellite with 0 velocity relative to the Earth to keep it at the pole, as there is no deviation of position at that point.
    Down with the BourgeoisOS oppressors, webOS users unite!
  4. #164  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Why bother with a compass anyways? The magnetic north pole is currently moving towards Russia at 50Km/Y, so they won't be accurate in a couple months anyways. We just need a geo-stationary north and south pole satellite.
    Quote Originally Posted by barkerja View Post
    Deviation fixes can easily be issued in software/firmware updates. It has all kinds of practical uses.
    Could be wrong, but I don't think he was serious.
  5. #165  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Woo! Lets fix all our problems with software! Oh, wait, there's a bug and 20 planes just crashed, whoops?

    We need a stationary system anyways for things like that, might as well get it out of the way now, rather than later when people die because of our lack of action.
    Except that even if it were possible to hovver a transmitter hundreds of miles above the north pole somehow it would require multiple detectors and software to traingulate its position. Much more complicated and accident prone than a magnetic compass and a quick bit of trigonometry.

    It is possible that one day the magnetosphere may fail altogether (or ever reverse) but if/when that happens we'll have bigger problems than our compasses failing.
  6. #166  
    Damn it, the nerds have taken over this thread.
  7. #167  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Could be wrong, but I don't think he was serious.
    I hope your are right but it certainly didn't look that way.
  8. #168  
    Quote Originally Posted by Beanis View Post
    Damn it, the nerds have taken over this thread.
    Power to the nerds!!! *yea*
    <This Page is Blank>
  9. #169  
    Quote Originally Posted by Beanis View Post
    Damn it, the nerds have taken over this thread.
    Sorry.
  10. #170  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    OK, he wasn't kidding.

    Shoot, you do that, then what would we do in classes that teach sailing navigation for roughly half of those two weeks?
    Teach them how to navigate by the stars, at least they won't be moving position significantly for another million years.
    Down with the BourgeoisOS oppressors, webOS users unite!
  11. #171  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Teach them how to navigate by the stars, at least they won't be moving position significantly for another million years.
    Yep.

    The sun and a good analogue watch are pretty handy during the daytime too.

    Oh dear, there I go again
  12. #172  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Teach them how to navigate by the stars, at least they won't be moving position significantly for another million years.
    S A I L I N G

    They do teach to navigate by the stars. Unfortunately sailboats move too slowly to use the stars and the horizon exclusively. That's why you have to have a compass to use the sextant.

    Of course, the nerdy sailors need neither. They just use a GPS.
  13. #173  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    And that's where you're messing up. You just have to have a satellite with 0 velocity relative to the Earth to keep it at the pole, as there is no deviation of position at that point.
    The fuel required to do that would make such a satellite impractical.
  14. #174  
    Newtons first law, an object at rest, stays at rest.

    We put one at rest in orbit, it will stay there.
    Down with the BourgeoisOS oppressors, webOS users unite!
  15. #175  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Newtons first law, an object at rest, stays at rest.

    We put one at rest in orbit, it will stay there.
    I'm no physicist, but that strikes me as wholly inapplicable. Its not "at rest" at all if its in orbit. (and that object...will stay at rest until forces act upon it. ie. gravity).
  16. dave75's Avatar
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    #176  
    So if you hold something 5 feet above the gound and let go it will stay there? There is still gravity acting on the satellite. A geostationary satellite is still in orbit, it's not sitting still. It's just travelling at the same velocity that the earth is spinning. It must be at the equator.
  17. #177  
    Quote Originally Posted by andyhurley View Post
    I beg your pardon?

    Now I'm

    Geostationary orbits work by matching the orbit speed to the rotation of the earth. One orbit of the satellite has to exaclty match (and be in the same direction as) the earth's rotation (i.e. 24 hours). If the direction of that orbit is not directly over the equator then the satellite will be moving relative to the surface so it can't be over the pole, or anywhere else for that matter.
    I have no idea what the heck I was thinking.

    I went digging to refresh myself and found this: Geostationary polar orbit?
  18. #178  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Newtons first law, an object at rest, stays at rest.

    We put one at rest in orbit, it will stay there.
    Fine point - but the Earth isn't at rest. After thinking about this I realized I was crazy and confused myself. The sat needs to stay relatively at rest to the Earth while the entire system is moving around the Sun which in turn isn't sitting still either. An orbit around the Earth at the poles wouldn't have the illusion of relative rest to anyone on the Earth's surface. Being at rest relative to the poles would mean it would be orbiting the sun and I don't think an object the weight of a sat would be in a stable efficient orbit - it would require constant adjustments and changes to velocity to match the Earth's orbit - if it's even possible.
  19. #179  
    One person in the thread mentioned it would be possible with constant thrust, and as they have just launched the first solar sail and proved the concept, perhaps a satellite with a sail in the proper position would have enough constant force to maintain position then.
    Down with the BourgeoisOS oppressors, webOS users unite!
  20. #180  
    Keep coming back here to check on this thread and all I get is



    I see pandas.
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