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  1.    #1  
    look at it this way, with the touchpad slow initial sales what a GREAT marketing move. HP sold all the Touchpads they have or close to it. They sold them at close to cost or a little loss.

    They have EVERYONE buying the WebOS product. What they lose on the units they would have spent on advertisement. Then the comment in the phone call about not making the WebOS hardware caused everyone to run out and get a touchpad on a "fire sale"

    now with all these people with the touchpads people will want MORE WebOS products, apps and support
  2. #2  
    Wrong forum. This has been discussed in depth on the Touchpad and WebOS discussion forums.

    I think the view is that HP aren't making a slight loss on the sale, some reports have suggested its cost them in the 100s of million $.

    The view is also that a weekend of even 1million TP sales (the majority of which will go on ebay, or to people who 'bought one of those tablet thingys because it was cheap') is still utterly insignificant compared with the ipad market share.
  3. rbyrne's Avatar
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    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Amos View Post
    look at it this way, with the touchpad slow initial sales what a GREAT marketing move. HP sold all the Touchpads they have or close to it. They sold them at close to cost or a little loss.

    They have EVERYONE buying the WebOS product. What they lose on the units they would have spent on advertisement. Then the comment in the phone call about not making the WebOS hardware caused everyone to run out and get a touchpad on a "fire sale"

    now with all these people with the touchpads people will want MORE WebOS products, apps and support
    IMO its great news for webOS, bad news for HP... they lost 100 million during that firesale, plus 1.2 billion buying palm + all R&D making the Touchpad, veer and pre3
  4. #4  
    Meanwhile, how much money has Google lost on Android? They're developing it, hosting it, supporting OEMs, hosting the app store - and all they get in return is cents per app sold.

    Hell, MICROSOFT makes more money per Android phone sold than Google. MS gets $15 per Android unit. Google gets zilch.

    Google is haemorrhaging money left and right on Android: but they view it as a loss leader because they want to be HUGE. When they are, they'll start trying to make money off it. They are effectively buying marketshare. Nobody sees any problem with them doing it.

    As a matter of fact, the reckoning has already begun with the purchase of Moto. Now that people will preferentially buy Motogoogle devices, Google will start making some money. They'll make even more as some of the high-end OEMs step out of Android because their already slim profits are on the downturn because people interested in expensive high-end devices will buy directly from Google while they can't compete with low-end OEMs on price.
  5. cgk
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    #5  
    Meanwhile, how much money has Google lost on Android? They're developing it, hosting it, supporting OEMs, hosting the app store - and all they get in return is cents per app sold.
    You can't see the wood for the trees - Google's key interest here is adverts, that's what underpins their whole business model.

    Google are making at least $5 ARPU via ads per and that is expected to increase to somewhere in the region of $10 ARPU per year by 2012 - People like Oracle aren't suing google because they want to stop them making android, they want their piece of the action.

    On top of that, while it's quite murky to work out, I understand that every device that ships with google apps (mail, maps etc) plays a license fee. I also believe there are licence fees associated with location services that google underpins. With androids current user base that's a lot of people.

    That's before you consider sales from apps.

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