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  1.    #1  
    Does this mean the carrier agreements are not made or does it mean they are made?
  2. #2  
    Carriers have to certify that the phone's OS will work properly with their radios, network and carrier software (GPS, bloatware, etc). Carriers do this type of testing prior to final approval of products release to the public.
    Last edited by Achill3s; 03/25/2011 at 11:22 PM.
    Achill3s' Palm Pre: Modded and patched to death!!
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Achill3s View Post
    Carriers have to certify that the phone's OS will work properly with their radios, network and carrier software (GPS, bloatware, etc). Carriers do this type of testing prior to final approval of products release to the public.
    So then it can be assumed deals are made, and time tables are still being worked out?
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by astraith View Post
    So then it can be assumed deals are made, and time tables are still being worked out?
    Most likely. Carriers must have been picked already though deals might still be being worked out. Even if they finish the certification process soon it might still be awhile before we see any news on the device. Hopefully sooner then later.
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  5. #5  
    this means sprint and the other service providers are testing the phone's OS's and build quality when it comes to the pre3 lol
    ĦṔ-Ḷṫ-Ŧḯη
    Here is a direct link to webOS Doc for all carriers
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  6. #6  
    I hope Sprint gets the phone. I also hope it will come to all carriers right away too that way more phones get out to people so we can drive more apps to the platform.
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  7. #7  
    It's a complicated and slow process. Each carrier is different, but it goes something like this:

    • Propose new handset or OS to carrier (or Carrier makes a request to hardware maker)
    • Negotiate feature set with carrier to add/remove items
    • Develop prototype for carrier review
    • Argue and negotiate changes/improvements
    • Submit demo/evaluation unit (the Pre3 and TouchPad weren't far enough along for this on feb9th IMHO).
    • Argue and negotiate with carrier to make changes/improvements. This is where Palm would commit to delivery time frames and Sprint would determine when they could fit in the product launch, 3-6-9 months down the road.
    • Submit updated version for acceptance testing by product management (this is where I think Sprint probably is with the Feb 9th devices - at least the Veer)
    • Right about here is where they might agree to carry the product, and Palm would start building.
    • Engage and plan deployment of device (pending acceptance). This includes creating and documenting a detailed process for provisioning, support, and training.
    • While working on the plan, the new stuff goes to each stakeholder for acceptance testing. This is not a QA exercise. Bugs restart back to square one.
    • Once each group had signed off on acceptance, they have to do final acceptance testing for the entire end-to-end experience. This is to smooth out the user experience. Product problems found at this point take you back a few steps. This is "certification" by the carrier.
    • Assuming UAT passes, this is probably where an FCC request is made (and kept confidential). This is FCC "certification"
    • Once FCC approval is granted, they finalize plans for launch or announcement. If it's a brand-new handset, that is usually announced by the manufacturer. If it's new to Sprint, they announce it.
    • Marketing finalizes launch/branding/marketing/sales plans and funding
    • Final system updates to integrate all aspects of provisioning, billing, operation and support. It is completely documented and tested, material is prepared for training call center support and technicians
    • Sales and support material is delivered, training and promotions are initiated
    • Product is in production
    • Product is announced
    • Product is launched and available to purchase

    I've probably missed a few steps, and most steps have several parallel processes in different groups. But you get the idea.
    Last edited by Cantaffordit; 03/26/2011 at 11:07 AM.
  8. #8  
    dont forget the extra add on testing phase for all and any HP/Palm phones since the pre minus lol
    ĦṔ-Ḷṫ-Ŧḯη
    Here is a direct link to webOS Doc for all carriers
    http://www.webos-internals.org/wiki/...octor_Versions
    P.S. if i have helped you and you are thankful please hit the thanks button to the right---->
  9. #9  
    That's not a big deal, they just bake them in an oven at 450 deg for 40 minutes.

    If it becomes an oreo, it's not ready to ship.
    Last edited by Cantaffordit; 03/26/2011 at 01:23 PM.
  10. #10  
    yep works every time !!
    ĦṔ-Ḷṫ-Ŧḯη
    Here is a direct link to webOS Doc for all carriers
    http://www.webos-internals.org/wiki/...octor_Versions
    P.S. if i have helped you and you are thankful please hit the thanks button to the right---->
  11. #11  
    I had met someone about 5 months ago that was a certification engineer at Sprint. At the time, he was doing extensive testing on the HD7, now known as the HTC Arrive. This is the windows phone 7 sprint that was just released for Sprint. This was in early November of 2010 and the phone was just released about a week ago.

    There was some weird stuff going on with Windows, such as Sprint seemlingly requiring them to have the NoDo update (copy & paste) ready to ship with the device, but it was still quite a while before the Device was revealed to the public and launched.

    I have a good friend who worked for Sprint doing device certification (I'm in Kansas City) when the original Pre was given to them. It took 5 months from the time sprint got their hands on the phone until it was released. I just asked him typical time frame, and he said 2-6 months of testing is typical. I used to get good information from him on Sprint phones before release. Unfortunately, so did some tech sites, and then Sprint found out too...

    We have no idae where any carrier is with this process or any details at all to go on, but figured this information might shed some light on the situation so we don't get false hope?
    Last edited by BotleRocketWar; 03/26/2011 at 12:32 PM.
  12. #12  
    ive already stated that sprint was in testing with the pre3 and will be testing extensively because of the issue with the previous pre's
    ĦṔ-Ḷṫ-Ŧḯη
    Here is a direct link to webOS Doc for all carriers
    http://www.webos-internals.org/wiki/...octor_Versions
    P.S. if i have helped you and you are thankful please hit the thanks button to the right---->
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    It's a complicated and slow process. Each carrier is different, but it goes something like this:

    • Submit updated version for acceptance testing by product management (this is where I think Sprint probably is with the Feb 9th devices - at least the Veer)

    I've probably missed a few steps, and most steps have several parallel processes in different groups. But you get the idea.
    Veer is not going to be on a CDMA carrier when released. It only has GSM radios. I guess Veer on Sprint was wishful thinking on your part.
    Are you trying to hurt me?
  14. #14  
    Certainly wishful thinking to some extent. But they probably have plans they haven't announced. I was speaking more to the "readiness" of the Veer relative to the Pre3 and TouchPad, which were further behind.

    I'm sure that if Sprint wanted to launch the Veer, they could have a million CDMA units delivered to Dan Hess's house in less than 60 days. Hopefully they are working on that and just really good at keeping secrets.

    My personal hunch is that Sprint is going to offer the Pre3 and TouchPad, because they are about power and leading edge stuff and the Veer is a "world's smallest smartphone" that probably won't have appeal as broad as the Pre3 and Touchpad. Just a guess.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    My personal hunch is that Sprint is going to offer the Pre3 and TouchPad, because they are about power and leading edge stuff and the Veer is a "world's smallest smartphone" that probably won't have appeal as broad as the Pre3 and Touchpad.
    This makes sense and I agree with you.

    But does anyone else still remember the time when "world's smallest" had universal appeal and miniaturization was considered powerful, leading-edge stuff?
  16. #16  
    Yep, when Apple launched the iPod Mini, and then again with iPod Nano. It still has some appeal with things like cameras. But in the world of phones, screen size has been the issue.

    If they came up with a $10 data plan for veer users that don't want to make heavy use of the web browser on that tiny screen, you'd have a luxury feature phone IMHO. Paris Hilton would love it.
  17. #17  
    Rubi said that's his daily phone and believe he sounded like he does serious stuff with it... He has the choice of any phone he says.

    A Paris Hilton phone... I like that

    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    Yep, when Apple launched the iPod Mini, and then again with iPod Nano. It still has some appeal with things like cameras. But in the world of phones, screen size has been the issue.

    If they came up with a $10 data plan for veer users that don't want to make heavy use of the web browser on that tiny screen, you'd have a luxury feature phone IMHO. Paris Hilton would love it.
  18. #18  
    Purely American issue, by the way.

    I'm using O2's €10 data plan with my Pre and never reach its limits despite listening to football broadcasts over TuneIn almost every saturday.

    Actually, this really helps explain to me why the European reaction to the Veer has more positive, on the whole, than the American reaction - if I had to pay for data through my nose, I might also want to "have something tangible to show for it".
    I've always thought that people with gigantic phones have something to compensate for - maybe that something is a frustratingly big phone bill at the end of each month in some cases.
  19. #19  
    Ruby has his choice of FCC Approved phones... so he won't be able to carry the Pre3 until it's been approved...

    But I think there are lots of people carrying the Veer now, since they can get them internally before they are launched in europe. So boring old Pre2, or hot new Veer... easy choice for employees.

    I'd have to carry a magnifying glass, but they are all younger than I am.
  20. #20  
    I'd be willing to wager a few cents that Jon Rubinstein could theoretically choose from stuff the FCC hasn't even laid eyes on yet if he really wanted to.
    The FCC, if I'm not wildly mistaken, has to certify devices before they are sold at market. But manufacturers are internally testing devices long before filing them with the FCC.

    He may be WAY out of the pay scale usually associated with the job of hardware / software tester but if he really wanted to, I think HP's testing managers would gladly allow Mr. Rubinstein to be part of the testing pool for whichever product he desires. At that point, the limiting factor in his choice of everyday telephone hardware wouldn't be the FCC as much as the security issues involved in taking prototype hardware out of the house.
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