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  1. #2  
    This would certainly explain the Linux job listings on Palm's site that have been highlighted in other threads.
    Matt Milano
    President
    Praevius, Inc.
  2. #3  
    this would be extremely exciting...is this remotely possible??
  3. #4  
    What exactly is the difference between a smartphone and a feature phone? Is a feature phone stripped down version of Treo class phone to get to cheaper price points? Won't that cannibalize the Treo sales? It seems to me that people who post here will want more features and not less than Treo 650 ;-)
  4. #5  
    From - http://www.canalys.com/pr/2004/r2004061.htm

    Terms explained

    Feature phone: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for voice, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, but OS-based applications cannot be added without restriction. Example: Nokia 7650.

    Smart phone: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for voice, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, and OS-based applications can be added without restriction. Example: Sony Ericsson P900.

    Handheld: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for data, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, and has no integrated wireless WAN (GSM, GPRS or 3G) capability. Example: palmOne Tungsten T3.

    Wireless handheld: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for data, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, and has integrated wireless WAN (GSM, GPRS or 3G) capability. Example: O2 xda II, RIM BlackBerry series.

    Data-centric devices: handhelds & wireless handhelds.
    Voice-centric devices: feature phones & smart phones.
    Mobile device market: handhelds, wireless handhelds, feature phones & smart phones.

    EMEA: Europe, Middle East & Africa.
    APAC: Asia/Pacific region.
    BLUETOOTH!!!!
  5.    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by HasanDaddy
    \Feature phone: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for voice, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, but OS-based applications cannot be added without restriction. Example: Nokia 7650.

    Smart phone: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for voice, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, and OS-based applications can be added without restriction. Example: Sony Ericsson P900.
    Right, this is how palm and palmsource have used the terms also. I imagine carriers like the idea as well.

    The main difference is that a featurephone will not allow you to install apps. It will certainly reduce costs and support problems.
  6. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by HasanDaddy
    From - http://www.canalys.com/pr/2004/r2004061.htm

    Terms explained

    Feature phone: pocket-sized device positioned primarily for voice, offers full, configurable two-way data synchronisation with PC, but OS-based applications cannot be added without restriction. Example: Nokia 7650.
    One minor quibble (not wit you but with your source) - the Nokia 7650 is clearly a smartphone (as are all Symbian Series 60 phones). There's a whole section at Handango where you can go to buy apps.

    If Palm's coming out with a "feature phone", expect it to be more like a Sony Ericsson T637 type phone.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  7. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by phurth
    One minor quibble (not wit you but with your source) - the Nokia 7650 is clearly a smartphone (as are all Symbian Series 60 phones). There's a whole section at Handango where you can go to buy apps.
    I find most of these apps are actually games, fileviewers and such, and I did not find any real business apps.
  8. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by u_m_rasmussen
    I find most of these apps are actually games, fileviewers and such, and I did not find any real business apps.
    There are actually quite a lot of business apps for Series 60 phones. Clearly not as many as for Palm OS or Windows Mobile, though. The focus of Symbian is phone first, PDA functions next, but they are most definitely smart phones as defined in the earlier post. That's all I was saying.
    Current: iPhone 3G
    Retired from active duty: Treo 800w, Sprint Touch, Mogul, Apache, Cingular Treo 650, HP iPaq 4350, T|T, M505 - Nokia 3650 - SE R520m, T610, T637, Moto P280, etc, etc...
  9. #10  
    I have always wanted to dial phone numbers from a command line! And I can use grep to find phone numbers in my address book! Hey I finally found a use for the keyboard!
  10. Deviation's Avatar
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Druce MacFarlane
    I have always wanted to dial phone numbers from a command line! And I can use grep to find phone numbers in my address book! Hey I finally found a use for the keyboard!
    lol.. grep -l 'applebees' *.phone The joys of command line....

    Well you know the device will catch on with the uber geek crowd. I imagine there will be a plethora of apps for it as well.
  11. cue79's Avatar
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Deviation
    lol.. grep -l 'applebees' *.phone The joys of command line....

    Well you know the device will catch on with the uber geek crowd. I imagine there will be a plethora of apps for it as well.
    One would also assume that with Linux on the Palm, that apps like Thunderbird and FireFox can be reworked to run on there as well... and multi-threading should be possible as well... Hmm... Firefox and Thunderbird... wouldn't that be nice.... And hey.. OpenOffice for mobile... jeeze... that would be nifty...
  12. #13  
    Is the end in sight for Palm OS?
    The new Windows-based Treo smartphone could be the first nail in Palm OS's coffin
    Daniel Robinson, IT Week 06 Oct 2005
    http://www.vnunet.com/itweek/analysi...406/sight-palm

    In late September Palm unveiled a Treo smartphone running Microsoft's Windows Mobile instead of Palm OS. Many observers interpreted this as the beginning of the end for the Palm operating system as we now know it.

    Following Sony's exit from the PDA market last year, Palm is the only significant licensee of Palm OS. However, its current products run versions of Palm OS 5, and not the newer Palm OS Cobalt that Palm's former subsidiary PalmSource released last year.

    Palm's latest device, codenamed Treo on Windows, was developed because many corporate customers have a Microsoft-only strategy and demanded Windows on mobile devices to match their fleet of desktop PCs, according to Palm.

    "We're selling Treos to many small firms and consumers, but enterprises are only interested if they already have a Palm OS strategy. If they have a Microsoft strategy [for mobile], they don't want to change," said Palm's European vice-president, Francois Bornibus.

    Palm insisted it will continue to offer Palm OS Treos in the future. Tony Cripps of analyst Ovum commented, "Palm will have to [keep offering Palm OS], to maintain its beachhead with GSM operators. No Windows Mobile Treo targeted at this market will see the light of day before the second half of 2006."

    However, it seems unlikely that any further Palm OS Treos will be developed. Current models run an ageing version of the Palm platform, and to extend this to match the 3G network support in Windows Mobile 5.0 may prove costly.
    If firms will not buy Palm OS handsets, Palm may simply decide to cut its losses and ship only Microsoft-based models once the Treo 600 and Treo 650 reach end-of-life.

    Might the same thing happen to Palm's handheld range? Ken Wirt, senior vice-president of marketing, said his firm was waiting for PalmSource to port the Palm environment to Linux before moving away from Palm OS 5. He said that there were no plans to produce Windows Mobile PDAs. "It will take us about a year to build a product on Palm OS for Linux after they come out with it," Wirt added.

    PalmSource was recently acquired by Japanese software firm Access, but still expects to deliver Palm OS for Linux in the first half of 2006. Wirt said, "We're very optimistic about Linux - it will give us much broader access to chipsets, different processors and radios, because every vendor that puts out a chipset writes Linux drivers for it."

    Wirt said he did not think PalmSource's acquisition by Access would affect the Palm OS for Linux project. "We've worked with Access for a while - its NetFront powers our Blazer browser - so we have a good relationship," he added.

    While Palm looks set to continue shipping Palm OS 5 handhelds for the near future, Wirt admitted there would have to be a cut-off point. "At some point in the future, we would obviously prefer to be on one platform," he said.

    ###
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    #14  
    if one listens very closely.... somewhere in the dark, taps can be heard playing...... gently..

    frankengarnet is "alive", but.... not for long. its about to be hunted down by the angry mob.
    I gotta have more cowbell
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    #15  
    Waaait a minute. Linux + Treo + you can't install apps? This does not compute. I think you just blew up my little Dalek brain.
  15. #16  
    In one of the many presentations Palm gave a couple weeks ago, I recall they said that they would only produce platforms, not closed devices... A feature phone doesn't seem to fit here.

    But then Colligan also denied wanting to do another operating system.
  16. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by samkim
    In one of the many presentations Palm gave a couple weeks ago, I recall they said that they would only produce platforms, not closed devices... A feature phone doesn't seem to fit here.

    But then Colligan also denied wanting to do another operating system.

    yeah -- Reading all about the 700w release party I distingint remmebr the question being asked an asnwer -- "Will you have other OS 's on the Treo (besides Win 5.0 and Palm)? " - the answer was "NO" -- am I missing something.
    da Gimp

    Please note: My spelling sucks and I'm to lazy to check it.
  17. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by B-model
    yeah -- Reading all about the 700w release party I distingint remmebr the question being asked an asnwer -- "Will you have other OS 's on the Treo (besides Win 5.0 and Palm)? " - the answer was "NO" -- am I missing something.
    As I said in another thread, he was asked about Symbian and Linux, and I thought he was reacting to the idea of Symbian... Linux wouldn't necessarily be a third platform, given that it would arguably be an evolution of the Palm platform.

    And I don't know why Palm would be hiring Linux engineers if they weren't working on Linux.
  18. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman6
    Waaait a minute. Linux + Treo + you can't install apps? This does not compute. I think you just blew up my little Dalek brain.
    Actually, in the supposed "family of Treos" something along these lines makes sense.

    Last year our State bought thousands of Blackberrys for certain state workers. I know the guy that made the decision...his personal phone is a 650!!

    Why did he choose Blackberry? His answer: "***** Proof." The fact that you cant easily install 3rd party apps on the thing makes it very hard to mess things up. He said it would be a nightmare trying to support 650s where the users could have installed god-knows-what on the device only to call him up when it crashed wanting him to figure out the problem.

    So for a long time I have been saying Palm needs to offer a Treo that was "closed" in some way. Sure you would want some more built in apps probably, a better calander, chatter-like email, some other bells and whistles, but then shut it down so people cant add anything else except official updates. Oh yes, for the gov. and lots of companies no camera.
  19. #20  
    Doesn't Palmsource already sell a Feature Phone product as a result of the CMS acquisition (mFon product)? That might be one explanation of this rumor imo...

    Anyway, Nokia Series 40 are equivalent feature phone btw...
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