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  1. #21  
    I'm all about the convergence as well. And I believe converging gps into a Treo is an appropriate and useful idea. I'm exploring a new city this weekend and of course I'll have my Treo with me. How great would it be to use the gps functionality to find the locations of the sites I need/want to see. And I hike with my Treo so it would be useful whether I'm in the woods or in the city streets.

    But realistically, is there room in the Treo to incorporate this technology? Having a big SD card slot addition or an add-on like the wi-fi sled for the Treo600 would negate the advantage and I'd probably just do the Garmin thing.
    Sprint Treo 600 (since October '03) --> PPC 6700 (exactly 29 days) --> Sprint Treo 600 --> Sprint Treo 700p --> BB Curve 8330.
  2. #22  
    I have the iQue 3600 - got it in Dec 2003. It is an incredible tool. It lives on my dashboard, and has guided me around the country.

    But the idea of carrying around 2 PDAs everywhere I go is a bit of a pain in the ****.

    I already have a mount for my Treo, I'd love to pair down the gadgets. My dashboard has wires and cigarette power plugs everywhere. Yes, I could rip apart my dash and tuck everything neatly away, but I'd really like just one device.

    I had heard rumor that Garmin's GPS10 was going to be possibly ported for the PalmOS. This would be great.

    I got into the Palm + GPS via my M505 and a Magellan GPS sled, using Mapoplis. Seemed great, then I got a Garmin. I would never go back to anything less than the Garmin.

    It would make such perfect sense to merge the two. The Database of information for stores, gas, food, and more, with thier addresses and phone numbers at the top of my fingers was awesome.

    Having that with a phone attached, perfect!!!
    Cingular GSM Treo 650, Apple PowerBook G4, iQue 3600, iPod Photo 60GB
    PalmPilot > Palm Vx > Palm M505 > Garmin iQue 3600 > Treo 650


    Seek first to understand, then to be Understood
  3. #23  
    I wouldn't want to pay the extra cash to have this...
  4. efudd's Avatar
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    #24  
    to be serious, i am under the impression that it's not all that far fetched. Apparently the cdma versions have Assisted GPS, which from what i understand recieve all the gps signals required to get a fix. However the carriers insist that the data is send to them so their servers can perfrom the calculations to determine location (so they can try to sell it to us later). I believe the cdma chipset controls it all so the palm OS cant get at the data, but from a form factor, antenna, space issue, technical point of veiw- it is do-able. Cost would be the limiting factor and if anyone makes a chip set that is compatible.
  5. #25  
    I have a Nextel i860 that I paid $250 for earlier this year. I run a Java app. called TeleNav and get excellent turn by turn directions with a map no matter where I am. It uses the GPS capabilities that are supposed to be on every cell for e911. It's the main reason I keep a Nextel acct. Granted, it costs me a fee of $9.99 for unlimited use per month, but then again, charging $10 for this and $5 for that is not a new concept for Sprint. I would love to see Sprint put Telenav and Direct Connect on a Treo in the near future. OK, so not in the near future, but at least by this time next year.

    www.telenav.com
    Last edited by fairoasis; 08/10/2005 at 12:07 AM. Reason: Added TeleNav link
    My Treo: I think I'll keep her. All dressed up for prom and her date Foleo stood her up
  6. hlazar's Avatar
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    #26  
    The nextel gps info comes through nextel. We'll get gps from our carrier using the agps chip already in our treos. Expect to pay extra/month as with other services.
    Henry L lazarus hlazar@netaxs.com
    www.netaxs.com/~hlazar/
    www.netaxs.com/~hlazar/god.html
  7. #27  
    More money, another antenna, and yet another power drain...I think not.

    Currently we have at least 1 antenna for the phone itself and another for bluetooth. Add in one for wifi (which would be a much more usefull item then a gps)

    How many do you want in one small phone?

    Persoanlly I hope they leave out the GPS and Wifi in the next treo. Cost is lowered and in return you have a smaller footprint on the phone.

    If you want Wifi or GPS thats what the SD slot is for. Besides lowering the initial cost, its also somethign that should be able to move with you through upgrades.
  8. #28  
    Im pretty sure there is a federal mandate in place for next year that says every cell phone manufactured for use in the US must be able to transmit is current location to an emergency operator. In other words, when you call 911 but have no idea where you are, the phone will have already given that info. Just like OnStar, the phone will use GPS transmission reception to obtain that information.
  9. #29  
    As far as gps and the power issue...its just like bt? Turn it on when you...turn it off when you don't.
    Palm III-->Palm IIIxe-->Palm 505-->Samsung i300-->Treo 600-->PPC 6600-->Treo 650-->Treo 700wx-->BB Pearl--> BB Curve

  10. #30  
    Myth 1: The current Treo doesn't have GPS.
    Truth: It does, see http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759...119TX1K0000594

    Myth 2: It would require more bulk.
    Truth: Nope, see myth #1.

    Myth 3: It would cost more.
    Truth: Nope, again see myth #1

    Myth 4: This is a business phone, not intended for hiking, so GPS doesn't make sense.
    Truth: Look at Nextel. It specializes in the business cell phone sector and they include the GPS. They advertise it in commercials as a key differentiator.

    Reason not to want GPS 1: That's what the SD slot is for
    Rebuttal: I need it for memory. If the next Treo has Life Drive then you got a bit of argument. Still, the SD slot has been a failure due to the lack of drivers. If I could plug in a wifi card, then you have an argument, but I can't. I think the cost of a GPS card is something like $300.

    It's worth noting that Sprint and Nextel are merging. So it's likely that either Sprint is going to make GPS easily accessable as Nextel does or Nextel is going to start charging for each access. I wouldn't expect the later as it would alienate their customers.
  11. #31  
    the location feature used in that link seems to be more a cell strength bases system instead of a true GPS (satelite) based system..
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToolkiT
    the location feature used in that link seems to be more a cell strength bases system instead of a true GPS (satelite) based system..
    Okay, you got me. Just seeing if you were on your toes.

    In any event it's good enough for e-911, which means it's useful in a lot of cases.

    I don't know if Nextel's is true satelite or combines cell tower logic. In either case, Nextel's system is cheap enough that they give it out as free with contract. Thus I have to imagine that it wouldn't be an expensive add-on to the Treo.
  13. #33  
    I definately want GPS on tje next treo. that's a real killer app and what a smartphone should have.
  14. #34  
    Nope - don't want it

    The treo should be able to support it, via a 3rd party program (as the 650 losely does) but keep it out of the inital packadge -

    Focus the extra dollars on what everyone wants - memory, e-mail, BT 2.0 , etc, etc, etc (50 or so threads dicussing...)
    da Gimp

    Please note: My spelling sucks and I'm to lazy to check it.
  15. #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by B-model
    Focus the extra dollars on what everyone wants - memory, e-mail, BT 2.0 , etc, etc, etc (50 or so threads dicussing...)
    How do you know what everyone wants? Personally I prefer a GPS over email...
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  16. #36  
    Yeah, the Sprint Treo and ALL CDMA handset already come integratged with SnapTrack AGPS functionality builtin. Thus the Sprint Treo 650 at least already has GPS functionality integrated... now it's just a matter of Sprint turning on the AGPS features so users can access it...

    Also, earlier threads indicated that the AGPS API's were bundled in the Java plugin for the Treo. Thus all future apps may have to be java based to access the gps Api's....
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  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToolkiT
    the location feature used in that link seems to be more a cell strength bases system instead of a true GPS (satelite) based system..
    This seems to be a source of a lot of confusion. There are multiple technologies for locating a device, GPS is just the most accurate in the widest variety of locations. The other common technology is based on relative strengths of cellphone towers. There's a specific datastream associated with GPS (NMEA) supported by a lot of software (TomTom, Mapopolis, etc).

    The 650 has location technology built into it, like almost every cellphone made since a certain date, as required by E911, but it's not GPS. It might tell you where you are to within a city block or two (presuming you're in a dense metropolitan area with a lot of cell towers), but it's not going to tell you what part of what street you're on and what direction you're headed at what speed, like GPS. Nor is it ever going to spit out a NMEA datastream something like a TomTom or Mapopolis needs to put you on a moving map.

    It might be nice to tap into this lower res location technology for things like location based services (e.g. where's the nearest Starbucks), and I'm sure the carriers will do this sooner or later. They'll at least want advertisers to SMS you when you're in their neighborhood. But, if you want to do address to address routing on a moving map, you're probably going to need GPS (unless the current tower based technology gets a lot better), and that will add cost and size to the 650.

    Why not buy a matchbook sized bluetooth GPS? Keep it in your pocket and it's just like your 650 has built in GPS.
    - Dan Butterfield (dan@butterfields.net)
  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by danjb
    Why not buy a matchbook sized bluetooth GPS? Keep it in your pocket and it's just like your 650 has built in GPS.
    I just got one of those, but it is very cumbersome and doesnt work in your pocket, it needs line of sight with the satelites..
    <IMG WIDTH="200" HEIGHT="50" SRC=http://www.visorcentral.com/images/visorcentral.gif> (ex)VisorCentral Discussion Moderator
    Do files get embarrassed when they get unzipped?
  19. #39  
    Toolkit - I'm taking my "what everyone wants" from a very general consumer approach. I Thinnk we can all agree, those of us who currently own a Treo are not the eveyday phone 'consumer'. (either power users, or Business folk)

    If the approach by palm is to sell more handsets to everyone, not just a niche market, I don't belive GPS is the way to accomplish this. More common features like the e-mail. Evolving the form factor. EVDO should be the way to go

    of course... is that the palm appoach? We can only opinionate right now
    da Gimp

    Please note: My spelling sucks and I'm to lazy to check it.
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToolkiT
    I just got one of those, but it is very cumbersome and doesnt work in your pocket, it needs line of sight with the satelites..
    FWIW, you might try one the "new generation" SiRFstarIII chipset GPS's like the Globalsat BT-338. They're more accurate, faster, and better with weaker signals (like in your pocket) than some of the older GPS's. I've had a bunch of GPS's over the years (including one prior bluetooth one), and the BT-338 is a definite improvement. It does work in my pocket in most cases, with the only problem being if it's a pants pocket and I'm using it while walking, it gets confused on speed and direction due to the swinging of my leg.

    Note that like all GPS's you need to give the BT-338 a chance to lock onto satellites when it first starts up, which works fastest when it has a clear line of sight and is not moving. However, once it does this, it can even hold onto a signal inside my house or other places other GPS's would give up. And, it locks on very quickly, sometimes in seconds, and almost always in under a minute, unlike some older GPS's which could take as much as 3-5 minutes.

    In general though, any location technology (GPS included) is not magic, and typically depends on reliable reception of weak radio signals, and is rarely perfectly accurate. They all work best in open air, no clouds, etc.
    - Dan Butterfield (dan@butterfields.net)
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