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  1.    #1  
    I understand that for security reasons, the officials in London shut down the cellular networks, preventing people from calling home, the office, etc. If such an event would happen here (I live in Los Angeles), would we be able to send emails if we couldn't make phone calls? Does anyone know of any emergency ways to contact family if they shut down the cell network?
  2. #2  
    Unlikely. When the network is down, it is down. And I know blackberries were down when cels were in London.
  3. #3  
    In New York, I mean? Shut down the cellular networks? I just didn't think that was standard practice in the states, but honestly you couldn't make a phone call out of the city very easily that day whether you were on wireless or landline.
    This will sound paranoid, but the best thing to do is plan for those situations ahead. Have a predetermined course of action (actually, two would be better in case one is blocked by the emergency) that both you and loved will follow. Then you all know what to do. That way you (and they) don't have to worry about contacting each other as much (obviously in a situation like London you're going to worry some, and so are they) because you all know what to do and where to meet.
    You can do the same thing with co-workers. Less time spent trying to get through to people, more time getting somewhere safe!
    Go here if you're tired of being .
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  4. #4  
    What happens is not as simple as that. The police force use the Vodafone network, so to ensure that they can communicate ina disaster they change the priorities on the network, to ensure that enough lines are available for the police to get through.

    Other networks were still available although highly conjested.

    I had problems with land lines getting a line, never mind gsm networks.
  5. #5  
    its my understanding that they did that because the bombs were set off remotely, possibly by cell phone.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by wballz33
    its my understanding that they did that because the bombs were set off remotely, possibly by cell phone.
    cell phones work in the underground subways there?
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    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by nunoste
    I understand that for security reasons, the officials in London shut down the cellular networks, preventing people from calling home, the office, etc. If such an event would happen here (I live in Los Angeles), would we be able to send emails if we couldn't make phone calls? Does anyone know of any emergency ways to contact family if they shut down the cell network?
    I was present at Ground Zero on 9/11. After the first plane hit I made a quick call to my wife as we exited the fire escape. After that I was unable to get a call through on the ATT wireless network. The circuits got jammed in minutes. The moral of the story is that in such events the networks get overloaded quickly even if they aren't shut down.
  8. #8  
    Two things happen:

    1. When there is an emergency like that, everyone starts calling. The network gets overloaded and it is hard to get a call to go through. This was exacerbated on 9/11 by the fact that a lot of communications infrastructure through Lower Manhattan was destroyed with the World Trade Center. And, for instance, during the blackout in August 2003, many of the cell towers were affected by the loss of power.

    2. The government can also simply shut the network down now if they think the technology is being used for whatever the emergency is. I believe this happened in London. It happens two ways: scrambling in certain areas (this happens now still at certain high security events) or simply shutting things off entirely in the area. Inconvenient for people trying to make contact, but reasonable given the many scenarios in which cell phones, etc can be used to detonate bombs, etc.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by wballz33
    its my understanding that they did that because the bombs were set off remotely, possibly by cell phone.
    Yes, this is why the cell network was shut down. The bombs were detonated with cell phone triggers. This was to prevent any additional bombs from being detonated, as well as keep the lines clear for emergency services.
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  10. #10  
    dont the cell networks have the ability to give preference to a caller.

    it was my understanding that the chief of police (for example) would always get his call through no matter what was going on with other subscriibers to that service.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
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  11. #11  
    Yes, they do have that ability, Felipe.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by DrDoom
    This will sound paranoid, but the best thing to do is plan for those situations ahead. Have a predetermined course of action (actually, two would be better in case one is blocked by the emergency) that both you and loved will follow. Then you all know what to do. That way you (and they) don't have to worry about contacting each other as much (obviously in a situation like London you're going to worry some, and so are they) because you all know what to do and where to meet.
    You can do the same thing with co-workers. Less time spent trying to get through to people, more time getting somewhere safe!
    No wonder your name is DrDoom But seriously, that is the best advise anyone could get, thanks for sharing.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by nunoste
    I understand that for security reasons, the officials in London shut down the cellular networks, preventing people from calling home, the office, etc. If such an event would happen here (I live in Los Angeles), would we be able to send emails if we couldn't make phone calls? Does anyone know of any emergency ways to contact family if they shut down the cell network?
    Hunt down reporters. During 9/11 I know many people's families were contacted by news stations. I.e. those interviewed on camera or others news stations talked with - many asked if the station would get the info to families that they were okay and many stations obliged as best they could.

    Or, just find a news crew reporting and jump up and down in the background.

    Pamela
    Using my treo 650 for business:
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  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by mediasi
    Hunt down reporters. During 9/11 I know many people's families were contacted by news stations. I.e. those interviewed on camera or others news stations talked with - many asked if the station would get the info to families that they were okay and many stations obliged as best they could.

    Or, just find a news crew reporting and jump up and down in the background.

    Pamela
    Jumping up and down on live television during a national emergency is one of my favorite passtimes. Seriously.
    Why are you all looking at me like that?
    Go here if you're tired of being .
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  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by DrDoom
    Jumping up and down on live television during a national emergency is one of my favorite passtimes. Seriously.
    Why are you all looking at me like that?
    LOL - but who cares? If it gets the message to your family, hey, I'll gladly act like an ***...

    Pamela
    Using my treo 650 for business:
    DesignExtend.com
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Otter Emperor
    cell phones work in the underground subways there?
    You may not be aware that one of the four devices was on the top floor of a double decker bus.

    My brother -in-law used to work on the tube and they are introducing a system that enables cell phones to work on the Tube. Don't know when though.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Otter Emperor
    cell phones work in the underground subways there?
    Yes, they do in some parts of the UK, even underground, because they are just...more technically progressive, shall we say that the US. It was my understanding that towers/repeaters were installed underground in strategic locations to permit voice and data underground. NYC is now trying to implement a similiar strategy but imagine how the carriers are fighting over that one...exclusive coverage in NY subways? Hey, they'll kill for that...

    I love it here in the USA (and I'm a member of the Armed Forces), but the UK with its near ubiqutious WiFi, Treo's, Blackberries, many Internet cafes, large GSM prevalance and CHEAP broadband internet is really starting to sound enticing.

    Mind you, I live in southern Tennessee (for school) were some of the students don't even know how to dial a cell phone, never mind indentify a Treo or set up remote forwarding on their Blackberries. I have a tough time getting the gas stations to accept my mini-BoA card that goes on your keychain.

    We're so 1989 here, it's not even funny. If cell service went out, me and my boss would notice. Everyone else would worry about Nascar
    Last edited by jackbauer-ctu24; 07/09/2005 at 10:23 AM.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by jackbauer-ctu24
    Yes, they do in some parts of the UK, even underground, because they are just...more technically progressive, shall we say that the US. It was my understanding that towers/repeaters were installed underground in strategic locations to permit voice and data underground. NYC is now trying to implement a similiar strategy but imagine how the carriers are fighting over that one...exclusive coverage in NY subways? Hey, they'll kill for that...

    I love it here in the USA (and I'm a member of the Armed Forces), but the UK with its near ubiqutious WiFi, Treo's, Blackberries, many Internet cafes, large GSM prevalance and CHEAP broadband internet is really starting to sound enticing.

    Mind you, I live in southern Tennessee (for school) were some of the students don't even know how to dial a cell phone, never mind indentify a Treo or set up remote forwarding on their Blackberries. I have a tough time getting the gas stations to accept my mini-BoA card that goes on your keychain.

    We're so 1989 here, it's not even funny. If cell service went out, me and my boss would notice. Everyone else would worry about Nascar
    I mean, wow. That was the most blatantly biased post I've ever seen. And no, I'm not from Tennessee. I just find it amusing that you think the UK is so much more advanced than us. I also laughed pretty heartily when you talked about how backwoods and backwards your neighbors in Tennessee are. Then I noticed that you had already edited your post once, and were still using incorrect words (see first bold word) and made up words (see second bold word). What does "indentify" mean anyway, oh technologically progressive guru?
    Please.
    1989 indeed.
    Was that the year you graduated with your Masters in English?
    Go here if you're tired of being .
    It'll be fun.
  19.    #19  
    I just talked to my father in law, who is in the cellular biz and he said that SMS messages were working even though voice was being prioritized for city officials, first responders, etc. This is only what he heard, but it would be nice to confirm for the future. Why would SMS work even though your voice is not?

    s
  20. #20  
    Because SMS is data... and it makes sense they would make it so they could reserve voice calls for emergency personnel but allow SMS messaging.

    Although, it would probably be pretty simple to SMS a command to a device.

    Pamela
    Using my treo 650 for business:
    DesignExtend.com
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