Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 124
  1. #81  
    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    Just as Apple will evolve with the iPod, Microsoft will as well. They spend more on R&D than most companies do on G&A.
    The question is how long does it take to roll out a new OS? <cough> Longhorn <cough>.
    ---
    Chad Morrill
    Visor (2MB) // Visor Edge // Treo 180 // Treo 600 // Nextel Blackberry 7510 // TMobile Blackberry 7230 // Motorola V180 // Motorola A925
    http://chadsnewest.joysta.com
  2. #82  
    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    Um, this couldn't be more wrong if you tried. How is Windows 'broken'?
    At the risk of making this thread into a MS vs Apple thread, I'm not even going to gratify you with a link...just go search (you can even use the MSN search) for how many times Windows has been patched in the last 12 months. Search for all the Windows security holes. Search for all the viruses (or virii) that affect Windows.
    Ok, now search for Mac updates, Mac security holes, Mac viruses. Sure there are some, but there is not ONE virus. This same holds true for Linux.

    Aside from this, you should know I'm a MCSE, etc, etc. All I do all day long is support, er, fix, Windows at my work....if it weren't for Microsoft, I'd be out of a job. But at the end of the day, I am so sick of computers not working... I go home to my mac and browse the web without the fear of viruses, spyware, or having to reboot because XP just installed the lastest handful of patches. I effortlessly connect my scanner, printer, and camera to my mac and everything works, oh yeah, it works the FIRST time. No reboots, no downloading new drivers, no 'searching for new hardware....', no need to troubleshoot the hardware. What Windows can do in about 20 clicks and a reboot, Mac can do in about 5 clicks and no reboots.

    I can sympathize with you...I used to have similar feelings about Mac, but I've seen the light. I've repented. I sat with awe when I bought a used G4 Mac from my friend (he had to get a G5), and saw all that a Mac could do.

    Granted, I still have Windows at home, but that's pretty much for the kids now... we haven't purchased any Mac games yet...and probably won't anytime soon.

    The Mac is like any other appliance now...the toaster always toasts the bread, the microwave always heats the food, the dishwasher always washes the dishes, and the Mac always imports photos from the camera. I never have to fix it or troubleshoot it.

    You won't understand ... you just really gotta ....
  3. #83  
    I'm with you about all those %$#@ patches! New patch today, have to reboot, LOL! Many also take up a lot of space.
    HP has officially ruined it's own platform and kicked webOS loyalists and early TouchPad adopters to the curb. You think after you drop it like a hot potato and mention it made no money and is costing you money, anyone else wants it??? Way to go HP!!

    And some people are fools to keep believing their hype. HP has shown they will throw webOS under the bus and people are still having faith in them??? News flash: if it's own company won't stand behind it, it's finished!
  4. #84  
    Quote Originally Posted by ekuzco
    Amen.
    Windows hasn't changed much either...you still have to reboot way too often. Windows is 'broken' and keeps getting more 'broken'.
    I suggest you might have something wrong with your machine in this case.
    I have two windows 2000 machines and 2 windows xp machines and they easily go a month without problems. They're up all the time, I don't shut them down and only reboot them when I install something.
  5. #85  
    Quote Originally Posted by ekuzco
    At the risk of making this thread into a MS vs Apple thread, I'm not even going to gratify you with a link...just go search (you can even use the MSN search) for how many times Windows has been patched in the last 12 months. Search for all the Windows security holes. Search for all the viruses (or virii) that affect Windows.
    Ok, now search for Mac updates, Mac security holes, Mac viruses. Sure there are some, but there is not ONE virus. This same holds true for Linux.
    and you don't think that if Apple led marketshare that the virus writers and hackers would switch and attack that OS instead?
    If you think MS patching security holes is a negative, and that Mac doesn't have virus or security problems because it's a completely secure OS I feel sorry for the people you "support".
    I take 2 or 3 vacations a year, and take at least 80 pictures each trip, never had a problem getting them on either of the windows machines I put them on or printing them.
    If you have so many problems with Windows, I suggest you and your users need a lot more education.
  6. #86  
    Quote Originally Posted by chadallan80
    The question is how long does it take to roll out a new OS? <cough> Longhorn <cough>.
    Longhorn can take as long as it needs to get it right. Longhorn will be revolutionary when it comes out. Besides, don't forget that part of the delay in Longhorn has to do with the supporting technologies that are based on the same platform. Longhorn will share many components with the latest versions of Visual Studio 2005, the .Net Framework 2.0, and SQL Server 2005.

    Longhorn will be a complete rearchitecture from any Microsoft OS before it, and that takes time. It doesn't sit on top of a borrowed Unix kernel like some unnamed OS.

    And it's not like XP is stale. If you think it is, you can always go to Server 2003. It's not like MS is 5 years between rollouts.
    I'm back!
  7. #87  
    Quote Originally Posted by ekuzco
    At the risk of making this thread into a MS vs Apple thread, I'm not even going to gratify you with a link...just go search (you can even use the MSN search) for how many times Windows has been patched in the last 12 months. Search for all the Windows security holes. Search for all the viruses (or virii) that affect Windows.
    Ok, now search for Mac updates, Mac security holes, Mac viruses. Sure there are some, but there is not ONE virus. This same holds true for Linux.
    If you truly were an MCSE, then you'd know that this is a complete MYTH perpetuated by the Mac and Linux types with inferiority complexes. OSX and any flavor of Linux ARE NO MORE STABLE NOR SECURE than XP or 2003. Why are there more viruses for Windows than Mac? Not because OSX is more secure, that's been proven to not be true. It's because no one cares in writing viruses that won't have an impact. Who cares that you've written a virus that impacts 3% of the OS in use today. That's what, 3000 machines? No, you make a much bigger impact when you affect 30 million. People want to make a big splash when they release their new virus to demonstrate their "skills", not pick on the crippled.

    And before the open source fanboys step in, your code is no more secure either. Fan favorite Firefox (which I also happen to use), is no more secure than the oft-maligned IE.

    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1814056,00.asp

    Four critical security flaws in 6 weeks does not a secure system make.
    I'm back!
  8. #88  
    Quote Originally Posted by Primate
    and you don't think that if Apple led marketshare that the virus writers and hackers would switch and attack that OS instead?
    No, I don't. They wouldn't be as able to anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by Primate
    If you think MS patching security holes is a negative, and that Mac doesn't have virus or security problems because it's a completely secure OS I feel sorry for the people you "support".
    To start with, Apple has a time-tested base for their OS. It goes back to the NeXT days and even further back with the incorporation of Unix. Add to that the object based structure (Next) and probably other factors I'm not smart enough to be aware of.

    Then you have important factors like:
    • Windows coming with five of its ports open right from the get-go in the installation; Mac OS X comes with all of them shut and locked... These ports are precisely what permitted viruses like Blaster to infiltrate millions of PC’s. Microsoft says that it won’t have an opportunity to close these ports until the next version of Windows, which is a couple of years away.

    • When a program tries to install itself in Mac OS X... a dialog box interrupts your work and asks you permission for that installation -- in fact, requires your account password. Windows XP goes ahead and installs it, potentially without your awareness.

    • Administrator accounts in Windows (and therefore viruses that exploit it) have access to all areas of the operating system. In Mac OS X, even an administrator can’t touch the files that drive the operating system itself. A Mac OS X virus (if there were such a thing) could theoretically wipe out all of your files, but wouldn’t be able to access anyone else’s stuff -- and couldn’t touch the operating system itself; thereby, allowing you to continue to work, unlike a Windows machine.

    • No Macintosh e-mail program automatically runs scripts that come attached to incoming messages, as Microsoft Outlook does.

    • It is much harder to run executable code from a buffer overflow on the PowerPC than it is from an x86 chip.

    • Apple’s OS keeps its virtual memory's transitory data private. M$ doesn’t think about this kind of stuff.

    • In stealth mode, your Mac won’t even acknowledge its very existence when people are scanning for machines to attack.

    • The Mac OS X delivers the highest level of security by adopting industry standards, participating in open software development, and just generally incorporating wise architectural decisions.
    Last edited by archie; 05/19/2005 at 02:33 PM. Reason: Edited to change to list item with bullet points
  9. #89  
    Um, I truly am an MCSE, and not to toot my own horn, but I can fix and have fixed just about every Windows problem my users throw at me, and do so a lot quicker than your average MCSE tech.

    Your problems are simply this....you've been so assimilated by Microsoft that you can't see the forest thru the trees, as was I once upon a time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Primate
    and you don't think that if Apple led marketshare that the virus writers and hackers would switch and attack that OS instead?
    In a word, a resounding NO!. Not possible. Like archie said, not on mac and not on Linux.

    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    Why are there more viruses for Windows than Mac? Not because OSX is more secure, that's been proven to not be true.
    Wrong....it has been proven to be true. Granted there are SOME flaws...emphasis on SOME, nothing is perfect. But there are NOWHERE near the holes found in Windows.
    OSX is Unix based... Linux is Unix based. Unix is the oldest OS still in existence for a reason...its stable and secure. Where it lacks in user friendliness, it gains in stability and security. Mac just happens to have perfected what Gnome and KDE (Linux) are still trying to perfect with the GUI. What do you think runs most of the internet? Which OS runs firewalls? What does NASA use? What does your bank use? What do hospitals use (for their back-end databases)? Unix based systems.

    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    It's because no one cares in writing viruses that won't have an impact. Who cares that you've written a virus that impacts 3% of the OS in use today.
    I agree with your theory to a point...that's the same theory I use when I am trying to convert people to macs (and have succeeded time and time again BTW), however, again, Unix-based OS ARE, by definition, secure. If you can't agree, you need to read up on the subject. Again, from time to time a flaw will be found, but not every week as is the case with Windows.
    Granted, Windows definitely has the upperhand when it comes to application software, but for the average home user, Mac is the way to go. For your secure internet servers, Unix is the way to go.

    You Windows guys will not win this fight....I tried too, but then saw the light. Windows does have its place, but its place is rapidly diminishing.
  10. #90  
    Quote Originally Posted by jmill72x
    Longhorn can take as long as it needs to get it right. Longhorn will be revolutionary when it comes out. Besides, don't forget that part of the delay in Longhorn has to do with the supporting technologies that are based on the same platform.
    From PCWorld.com - I know you'll remember this
    "Microsoft this week said it will sacrifice some key advances it had planned for Longhorn so it can deliver the successor to Windows XP in 2006.

    The next Windows release won't ship with the WinFS unified storage system, one of the three key components of Longhorn, as outlined by Microsoft at its Professional Developers Conference in October last year.

    The PDC was the first time Microsoft talked publicly about many of the features it planned for Longhorn. Company Chairman and Chief Software Architect Bill Gates hyped the operating system as "the biggest release of this decade, the biggest since Windows 95" and called WinFS a "Holy Grail.""

    Now this is from last year, and if it's changed, I haven't heard about it. But it seems as if MS is NOT taking it's time to get Longhorn right. It's NOT including WinFS and it's bringing technologies like Indigo, WinFX and Avalon to Server2003, so what the heck are they doing with Longhorn anyway!??!
    ---
    Chad Morrill
    Visor (2MB) // Visor Edge // Treo 180 // Treo 600 // Nextel Blackberry 7510 // TMobile Blackberry 7230 // Motorola V180 // Motorola A925
    http://chadsnewest.joysta.com
  11. #91  
    Quote Originally Posted by archie
    No, I don't. They wouldn't be as able to anyway.

    To start with, Apple has a time-tested base for their OS. It goes back to the NeXT days and even further back with the incorporation of Unix. Add to that the object based structure (Next) and probably other factors I'm not smart enough to be aware of.

    Then you have important factors like:
    • Windows coming with five of its ports open right from the get-go in the installation; Mac OS X comes with all of them shut and locked... These ports are precisely what permitted viruses like Blaster to infiltrate millions of PC’s. Microsoft says that it won’t have an opportunity to close these ports until the next version of Windows, which is a couple of years away.

    • When a program tries to install itself in Mac OS X... a dialog box interrupts your work and asks you permission for that installation -- in fact, requires your account password. Windows XP goes ahead and installs it, potentially without your awareness.

    • Administrator accounts in Windows (and therefore viruses that exploit it) have access to all areas of the operating system. In Mac OS X, even an administrator can’t touch the files that drive the operating system itself. A Mac OS X virus (if there were such a thing) could theoretically wipe out all of your files, but wouldn’t be able to access anyone else’s stuff -- and couldn’t touch the operating system itself; thereby, allowing you to continue to work, unlike a Windows machine.

    • No Macintosh e-mail program automatically runs scripts that come attached to incoming messages, as Microsoft Outlook does.

    • It is much harder to run executable code from a buffer overflow on the PowerPC than it is from an x86 chip.

    • Apple’s OS keeps its virtual memory's transitory data private. M$ doesn’t think about this kind of stuff.

    • In stealth mode, your Mac won’t even acknowledge its very existence when people are scanning for machines to attack.

    • The Mac OS X delivers the highest level of security by adopting industry standards, participating in open software development, and just generally incorporating wise architectural decisions.
    Ditto to everything above. I am a network administrator and I have to maintain over 400 machines. I personally use a Mac, never have to mess with virus protection, worry about missing updates, etc. Nearly all of my machines are Windows and about 30 % of them are Macs, I spend my ENTIRE time at work upgrading windows boxes to keep ahead of the viruses. This past week we encountered one that attached the virus protection disabled it and then proceeded to set up a zombie email server to spread itself. This simply CAN'T be done on a Mac. Please don't give me any talk re: "if they had more market share it would happen." It wouldn't. I am also a programmer and I can tell you that there is just NO way this would happen it just can't happen within the OS as archie stated so well. I also find it interesting that people that attack the Mac platform have more than likely never touched one for more than 10 minutes. It is an elegant platform as is the Treo650. Bill won't have a chance unless he sells to the lemmings who can't think for themselves.

    Now back to the topic. Watch uncle Bill closely as he is engaging in tactics that he has used with Apple in the past. If he can't bully you, he will try to buy you because he CAN'T out create you.

    just my 2 cents but hey what do I know, I just have been working with em for the last 30 years. You might want to poll some "Professionals" what they use as their own machine. I would bet it is either a Mac or Linux box. Nuff said.


    d
  12. #92  
    The love fest for Macs continue. I guess that's fine, but propagating old issues does no justice (like Outlook running attachment scripts).

    It's funny...I run a network of nearly 1000 systems, mostly Windows, and have zero viruses on any of the systems over the past 5 years. I have had both Linux and Macs compromised, however, although some of that was user error.

    I spend very little time "managing" the network...good planning helps with that.

    As for stability, XP is very solid, along with server 2003. On the other hand, I can lock up a Mac in no time.

    These religious battles are a waste of time...pick the tech that works for your business.
  13. #93  
    No Mike, you're wrong, you have to be wrong, the Mac fanatics said so, and one of them is an MCSE!
  14. #94  
    Quote Originally Posted by Primate
    No Mike, you're wrong, you have to be wrong, the Mac fanatics said so, and one of them is an MCSE!

    But of course, I am wrong. ;-) His MCSE proves he knows everything (everything about taking a multiple choice test).

    You know, I once drove a car, so I know everything about car racing.
  15. #95  
    I was just thinking today that Apple would be smart to incorporate iPod likenesses (iPod Powered?) into the Treo.
  16. #96  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikec
    You are not correcting me, as that implies I was wrong in the first place. You are posting you opinions, which history has shown to be as wrong, and have not basis in reality.
    Odd that I would choose to quote something that would make me sound like such an *****.
  17. #97  
    the only thing odd was your alternative universe interpretation of Apple's history.
  18. #98  
    Dude, take it easy. I have no reason (or desire) to change the history books or to spin some alternative universe and snowball you into believing some false story. I don't know you from Adam and have nothing to gain in making you believe something that isn't true. If you choose to believe some story that you have made up that is fine or if you want to disagree with it just because I said it... whatever trips your trigger, go right ahead.
    Since you seem to think everything that I write is incorrect, maybe... you would believe it if it came from Bill Gates mouth. In fact, just last week he said... and I quote, "Apple had a licensing strategy and they bankrupted everybody who took advantage of it."

    That is an EXACT quote from Bill in regards to Apple's licensing to hardware manufacturers.

    If this isn't enough proof for you, I'll get you some more.
  19. #99  
    Archie, I don't think everything you say is wrong.....I just call the spade a spade when your spin is contrary to the way things went down.

    Your quote of Gates saying "Apple had a licensing strategy and they bankrupted everybody who took advantage of it." more than proves my point. Apple effed over their "partners" with the whole "clone/licensing" debacle.

    Please, give me more info, because it just keeps supporting my point.

    I know two people (Mac lovers)who invested their own life savings into their clone businesses. They were doing great until Apple backstabbed them (and everyone else) because Apple could not compete.
  20. #100  
    Well here is another one for you. Three weeks ago Bill Gates said, "Steve made a pitch for operating-system integration of desktop search". "I was glad to see someone independent make that pitch. It's a good pitch."

    You see what is wrong here. He says it as if he is the one that came up with the idea and the capability. Nevermind that Apple has been working on the technology since before 1999 (it even goes back further when you factor in NeXT). Nevermind that Apple had a working version BEFORE Microsoft even announced they would be including it in Longhorn.

    My point is that you and Bill Gates can twist things around and put your spin on it and then everyone thinks it's true. I don't know why I am lumping you together with Bill Gates (other than you bug me just as much as he does), but let's get back to the thread topic here.

    Here is what you said about Bill Gates quote on the iPod being killed by the new generation of phones coming out this year:
    Quote Originally Posted by mikec
    I think Gates is right, but it doesn't take a genius to state the obvious.

    Now since we are on convergence, let's see what functions are in the device:

    -Phone
    -MP3
    -Video
    -Gaming
    -GPS
    -Camera / Video recorder
    -Palm devices
    -PPC devices
    -Smartphone OS
    What you are completely missing are 3 very important factors:
    1.) battery life
    2.) software interface/ease of use
    3.) iPod users want to define the terms and conditions of their life and this includes the interuptions that may occur while listening to the soundtrack of their life. Most iPod users are professionals who are voluntarily excluding themselves from the discourse of others.

    Number 3 is perhaps the most important point here. Sometimes you just have to turn it all off (email, phone ringing, vibrating, beeping, buzzing, blinking...) regardless of who you are. There is a desire to use technology to withdraw from the constant barrage of noise and interruptions. And while this could be argued to be a bad thing in considering the death of public space, it could also be argue that in some cases the iPod is the antidote. An iPod user doesn't have to be disturbed by mobile phone users or anyone else as they walk down the street in their own world.

    No wonder they are so popular in New York, huh!
    Last edited by archie; 06/17/2005 at 11:51 AM.
Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Posting Permissions