View Poll Results: Would you buy more music from iTMS if the songs had higher fidelity than a CD?

Voters
29. You may not vote on this poll
  • yes

    9 31.03%
  • no

    11 37.93%
  • depends on the ability to sync the iTunes Music Store songs to a Treo

    9 31.03%
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1.    #1  
    Would you buy more music from the iTunes Music Store if the songs were of higher fidelity than a store bought CD?

    I would.
  2. #2  
    No. My ears aren't that good.
  3. #3  
    I think it depends though. The difference between DVD-Audio and CDs is so amazing that my ears can certainly tell! DVD-audio would definitely be an insentive to get me moneyless. HOWEVER if you're talking about 192kbs instead of 128kbs... I can't tell any difference, so no
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by archie
    Would you buy more music from the iTunes Music Store if the songs were of higher fidelity than a store bought CD?

    I would.
    That would be vinal (aka a record, you know, the big 12" black CD's... LOL).
    CD's sound fine, some audiophiles say they lack the warmth of a vinal record, but these are the same people that pay hundreds for 'moster cable'. oxygen free copper and $20,000 Nautilus

    Do you mean "cd quailty" that is still compressed, verse zero loss?
  5. #5  
    Apple has developed a technology called Apple Lossless Encoder. It is part of iTunes on the Mac (not sure re: Windows). It is supposed to do about 50% compression with no loss of fidelity. There have been rumors that Apple may start selling music in this format, although the files would be much bigger.

    More to the point: I agree that it is doubtful that you can hear the difference between an MP3, AAC, Apple Lossless, CD AIFF, HYBRID SACD or DVD on a Treo or in most environments, short of a high end system.
  6. #6  
    I read somewhere where iTunes removed the plugins the lets you move the music from your iPod to another device. I would not by from iTunes if that is the case.
  7. #7  
    There are several hacks available to convert protected iTunes files and to download files from an iPod to a computer. One was pretty cool as it worked from within iTunes. I think Apple felt it was 'TOO EASY' and thus blocked it. You can still find a bunch of programs that do the same thing less elegantly.

    Check Versiontracker.com and do a search if interested.
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by ronbo2000
    I read somewhere where iTunes removed the plugins the lets you move the music from your iPod to another device. I would not by from iTunes if that is the case.
    No kidding?!?

    Well, I read somewhere where PalmOne removed the program the lets you move the music from your iPod to the Treo. I would not by from Palm if that is the case.

    What do you think...
  9. #9  
    I wouldn't blame Palm for removing a program like that. I would bet you that Apple came down on them. The overzealous protections built into itunes is absurd. I'm guessing Apple bent over for the music industry in order to get the vast music libraries.

    As an example, when you purchase a song, you can make 4 or 5 legal copies (I forget exactly). But if you hook up a second ipod (the one you want to put a second LEGAL copy on) to the computer that has the song, the computer asks if you want to wipe out the ipod songs and replace them all with the library on the computer you're currently hooked up to. It's totally ridiculous. You have to go into disc mode, and then hand drag the files, etc. You get this silly non-Apple like warning about how difficult it is to manage your music this way. Try managing your music (paid for on itunes) from your Apple computer (paid for) to your two ipods (paid for). It's downright silly.

    Meanwhile, kids who are much more savvy than our family have no problem finding copies of songs on the net they don't have to pay for.

    Climbing down off soapbox,

    Cluemeister
  10. #10  
    You're bashing the wrong company. The Music (and now Movie) Industry are the ones that are pushing all the DRM (digital rights management) stuff. Apple has actually figured out a compromise to allow people to download music easily and incorporate it into their lifestyle. iTunes allows you to burn the same Playlist a number of times (forgot if it is 5 or 10) to CD. This music can be re-imported into iTunes 'UNprotected'. There are a bunch of programs on versiontracker.com that allow you to do the same thing without the wasted CD.

    If you do manual sync (vs automatic), you can configure your iPod with selected tracks from multiple computers.

    Microsoft's Windows Media by the way is no better (and may be even more difficult to circumvent).
  11. #11  
    drrjv,

    I think you and I are on the same page. Understand I am an Apple fan. We have four laptops (3 ibooks, 1 powerbook), 2 ipods, an airport express, all upgraded with Panther. We have purchased about a hundred and fifty songs off itunes.

    Is it possible to share purchased itunes songs, yes. Is it very un-Apple like in that they have locked the ipod to one machine, which makes it harder for paying customers to make LEGAL copies of the songs? Yes. The process of exporting and then re-importing songs to unprotect them is an example of how foolish the copy protection is.

    You are right that it is the music and movie industry pulling the strings, but as I said before, Apple didn't have to bend over for them just so they can be the first ones to make millions. But they did.

    Cluemeister
  12. #12  
    I am an Apple fan too and OS X is phenomenal - way better than Windows without question.

    Apple right now owns the music market. They have 80% + of the hard drive player market and are rumored to come out with a flash-based player. Jobs is quoted as saying that iTunes is only there to sell iPods as they make almost no money on iTunes sales. Thus, if Apple were to 'open' iTunes, they would sell less iPods as people would use other devices.

    I think they like it the way it is due to simplicity. Crank up iTunes, buy a few tunes, sync with your iPod - that's all the majority of the population wants. We are in a minority presently, screwing around with MP3 files on a phone (although it may become very common in a few years).

    If you really want to save money and get music in any format you desire, check out allofmp3.com, a Russian site that sells songs for 5-10 cents each.
  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cluemeister
    I wouldn't blame Palm for removing a program like that. I would bet you that Apple came down on them. The overzealous protections built into itunes is absurd. I'm guessing Apple bent over for the music industry in order to get the vast music libraries.

    As an example, when you purchase a song, you can make 4 or 5 legal copies (I forget exactly).
    You must have forgotten. Apple has the most liberal licensing of anyone else. You can spread your songs across 5 machines (even changing what machines these are over time so you are not SOL when you upgrade hardware) and make unlimited copies (you can only do 10 in a row for some reason, after that, you have to make a new playlist to burn 10 more)

    Quote Originally Posted by Cluemeister
    But if you hook up a second ipod (the one you want to put a second LEGAL copy on) to the computer that has the song, the computer asks if you want to wipe out the ipod songs and replace them all with the library on the computer you're currently hooked up to. It's totally ridiculous.
    There is an easy solution to this. Just make a seperate playlist for each iPod and you can put whatever you want on them (even have duplicate songs on each iPod). You don't have to go into the manual disc mode.

    Try it! It's slick.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Chick-Dance
    I am a huge iPod fan (got some 1200 songs on mine). I bought two albums (full CD version) @ the iTune Music Store and I enjoy them a lot. For $9.99 you get a full CD. I listen to MP3 music and it suits my needs just fine.
    Do you listen to your iTMS songs on a stereo with fairly high fidelity (like a home stereo)?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Chick-Dance
    For $9.99 you get a full CD. I listen to MP3 music and it suits my needs just fine.
    That's what I like about iTMS, a full length CD for $9.99. Beats paying $15.00 at Best Buy.

    Chick, is that you on your avatar? If so, niiicce....
    Make It Happen!!
    If you don't, who will?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Chick-Dance
    For $9.99 you get a full CD. I listen to MP3 music and it suits my needs just fine.
    While I am all about supporting the notion of online music venues, for $9.99 you ONLY get the audio files. Please feel free to correct me if I am wrong, as I have still only purchased CDs and rip them to MP3...the $12-14 that my albums of interest cost also include the jewel case (hah, big whoop) along with the art and lyrics (which I find to be quintessential to complement the music). Even though I try to find and/or scan in the cover art, I don't believe there is a replacement for having the whole package in your hand as you listen to the tunes. mmmm, music.
    Last edited by Sherv; 12/10/2004 at 03:41 PM. Reason: typos
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Sherv
    While I am all about supporting the notion of online music venues, for $9.99 you ONLY get the audio files. Please feel free to correct me if I am wrong, as I have still only purchased CDs and rip them to MP3...the $12-14 that my albums of interest cost also include the jewel case (hah, big whoop) along with the art and lyrics (which I find to be quintessential to complement the music). Even though I try to find and/or scan in the cover art, I don't believe there is a replacement for having the whole package in your hand as you listen to the tunes. mmmm, music.
    If it's lyrics & covers you want, you can get that kind of stuff from sites like this and many more for free.
    Make It Happen!!
    If you don't, who will?
  18. #18  
    iTMS will never sell music that is of higher quality than a CD.

    CDs are 16 bit at 44.1KHz. Higher quality requires a combination of greater bit depth (ie 24bit or higher) and higher frequency (48, 88.2, 96 or 128KHz).

    As it stands now MP3s and AACs are very lossy compressors discarding essentially 90% of the information which is provided at CD quality.

    If iTMS were to sell songs at CD quality it would require literally 10X the bandwidth, memory, time etc. To go even higher in quality would require much much larger files.
  19. #19  
    It sounds good to me. I can't tell the difference when I'm listening in my truck or on headphones.
    Make It Happen!!
    If you don't, who will?
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by treosixoo
    If it's lyrics & covers you want, you can get that kind of stuff from sites like this and many more for free.
    Yeah, cover art can also be snagged from allmusicguide or amazon or even the label sites of the artists, but the art within the CD booklet is something that I don't like to lose....I love being able to leaf through a well designed booklet while listening to the tunes associated with it.

    Plus, the number of incorrectly transcribed lyrics I have found online is ridiculously large, making it (for me) more trouble than it's worth.

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