Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1.    #1  
    Maybe I am just to anal, but I have wrote Handspring once long ago (when I was one of the first to order the Treo 180k back in that joyous February many years ago) to tell them to use the correct spelling of "Cancelling" in the Service Connection Progress box you see when connecting to the internet.

    I wrote Palm to ask them to correct this glaring error as well. Through the many Treo iterations and the many firmware updates and the comporate changover, that incorrect spelling is still there.

    "Canceling..." just seems unprofessional. What ever happened to upholding proper standards and grammer in the English language?

    OK, I'm done. I hope someone is listening... PALM!
  2. #2  
    Canceling and Cancelling

    Both American Heritage and Merriam Webster dictionaries show both spellings are acceptable.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by archie
    Maybe I am just to anal, but I have wrote Handspring once long ago (when I was one of the first to order the Treo 180k back in that joyous February many years ago) to tell them to use the correct spelling of "Cancelling" in the Service Connection Progress box you see when connecting to the internet.

    I wrote Palm to ask them to correct this glaring error as well. Through the many Treo iterations and the many firmware updates and the comporate changover, that incorrect spelling is still there.

    "Canceling..." just seems unprofessional. What ever happened to upholding proper standards and grammer in the English language?

    OK, I'm done. I hope someone is listening... PALM!
    That's "too anal", "changeover" and "corporate".
    And I can't get my head around using 'have wrote' rather than 'have written to' or even just 'wrote to' (without the 'have'), but I'm aware that that's the Yank way so I won't mention it.
    Animo et Fide
  4.    #4  
    Ugh!
    How embarrassing. Perhaps I should have read through my own post before firing off some quick anal thought.

    Quote Originally Posted by lb505
    Canceling and Cancelling

    Both American Heritage and Merriam Webster dictionaries show both spellings are acceptable.
    In my feeble attempt to act highly educated, this was part of my point. What is happening to our language. I remember when "cancelling" was the only way to spell the word (using the 2 consecutive consonant rule when adding "ing"). Thanks though for bringing this to my attention.
  5. #5  
    Well, I have to admit 'Canceling' does look weird...
  6. #6  
    MS Word automatically changes "cancelling" to "canceling" and if you change it back it marks it as misspelled.
    Treo 600 on T-Mobile since March 2004
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterBrown
    That's "too anal", "changeover" and "corporate".
    And I can't get my head around using 'have wrote' rather than 'have written to' or even just 'wrote to' (without the 'have'), but I'm aware that that's the Yank way so I won't mention it.
    It is NOT the Yank way. It is simply incorrect grammar.

    As to doubling the final consonant before adding the -ing suffix...it is as subject to exceptions as any rule of grammar.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by lb505
    Canceling and Cancelling

    Both American Heritage and Merriam Webster dictionaries show both spellings are acceptable.
    It's a good thing I read this, cause otherwise if someone asked me I would have bet good money that 'Cancelling' is the only correct way to spell the word.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjay
    It's a good thing I read this, cause otherwise if someone asked me I would have bet good money that 'Cancelling' is the only correct way to spell the word.
    That is, IF you ever get into an argument about the correct spelling for "Cancelling"... d'oh! Already did.

    (...or was that "speling"??)

    ugh.. I shouldn't post again until I get some sleep..
  10. #10  
  11. #11  
    Hmm. I guess my lack of posting skills is showing.

    While we're at it, how about the word definitely? Not "definately". It is definitely spelled definitely. Drives me crazy. I guess we are all anal about something...
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by archie
    Ugh!
    How embarrassing. Perhaps I should have read through my own post before firing off some quick anal thought.
    Archie if I read your post correctly you are mistaking farts for thought. That could be your "hole" problem.
    “There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order.”
    — Ed Howdershelt
    "A government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take away everything you have."- Thomas Jefferson
  13. #13  
    While we're at it, the three mistakes that drive me crazy are:

    1. To, too and two
    2. Your and you're (and yer )
    3. There, their and they're (the biggie!)

    Its and it's gives me a slight case of the twitches, but nothing too serious. Now I've just read my post about 30 times to make sure I didn't make any of those mistakes!
    <a href="http://www.terriblemovies.com">TerribleMovies.Com</a>
  14. ls3mach's Avatar
    Posts
    659 Posts
    Global Posts
    746 Global Posts
    #14  
    PIN Number
    VIN Number (damn ebay)
    ATM Machine
    Irrergardless
    Coke=Any soft drink
    Xerox=Photocopy
    Band-aid=Adhesive bandage
    You still here?

    That's the kind of crap that hacks me off.

    Lonzo
  15. #15  
    That's interesting Alli, using 'wrote' without 'to' appears so often in US usage I'd assumed it was accepted over there. It really jarred for me in the film The Limey where an English guy uses it. Similarly I've always thought 'canceling' was an American spelling, if you set MS Word to UK English you'll find it gets changed the other way!

    As far as PIN Number goes, that kind of duplication has been happening for a loong time. There's a hill in Lancashire called Pendle Hill (infamous for being the last place to hang women for being witches in Britain), Pen means hill, Pendle is an abbreviation of Pen Hill (when people forgot what Pen meant), so Pendle Hill is, etymologically speaking, Hill Hill Hill.
    Last edited by PeterBrown; 08/12/2004 at 02:46 AM.
    Animo et Fide
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by PeterBrown

    As far as PIN Number goes, that kind of duplication has been happening for a loong time. There's a hill in Lancashire called Pendle Hill (infamous for being the last place to hang women for being witches in Britain), Pen means hill, Pendle is an abbreviation of Pen Hill (when people forgot what Pen meant), so Pendle Hill is, etymologically speaking, Hill Hill Hill.

    Now THAT is precisely the kind of thing that drives me bonkers! One of my favorite examples is the TAG (The Adjutant General, who heads up the state's military forces). Each state has a TAG, but the use of an article before the acronym is redundant since the T in TAG stands for THE. Grrrrrrrrr.

    The other one that drives me nuts, no wait...I'm already nuts, is "on tomorrow." Doesn't the prefix "to" in "tomorrow" cover the preposition? If you want to use "on," shouldn't you be saying "on the morrow?"

    <tumbling down from my soap box now>
  17. #17  
    Mine is the "MSDS Sheet" Material Safety Data Sheet Sheet. We have fallen into the same thing here at work with some of our internal documentation. CRS sheet, IRS sheet (Calibration Requirement Sheet Sheet, Inspection Requirement Sheet Sheet).
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by ls3mach
    Xerox=Photocopy
    Band-aid=Adhesive bandage

    That's the kind of crap that hacks me off.

    Lonzo
    Xerox found it very difficult to sell their machines to Poland, because their verb 'to photocopy' is 'xerox' (as they didn't have a pre-existing word). So after the collapse of the Warsaw Pact Xerox tried to set up a business there, but found that people didn't understand the concept of a 'Xerox xerox'. They thought Xerox had taken the word rather than created it.
    As for Band-Aid, here we say Elastoplast as that's the main brand. Though 'plaster' is used as well.
    Last edited by PeterBrown; 08/12/2004 at 11:11 AM.
    Animo et Fide
  19. #19  
    Same thing with Kleenex, people use that for any type of tissue.

    Some that bug me:

    NIC card (Network Interface Card card)
    HIV virus (Human Immunodeficiency Virus virus)

Posting Permissions