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  1.    #1  
    I have an AT&T T600 that I use here in California, and I am visiting England for 3 weeks at bthe end of the month. I do not want to get calls on my regular service while I am there (the roaming charges would be prohibitive) but I am wondering if I can buy three weeks of service in England on a SIM card, so that I can give people there my number and be available on my phone with a local number.

    Also if anyone in London has a line on an inexpensive but comfortable place to stay in the Islington area please let me know.

    Thanks

    Patrick Brinton
  2. #2  
    Hi Pat,

    I'm doing the same thing, and that's exactly what I'm doing. You can find them on-line before you go, or buy one when you get there (which is what I'm planning to do).

    Most of the cards I looked at are about $0.33US/min. to call the US, and all incoming calls (incl. international) are free.

    One caveat, if you're visiting multiple countries (including Ireland) the inter-country roaming charges will be higher than your state-side SIM.
  3. #3  
    WARNING!!! Do some homework first!! If you have an ATT T600, it likely is locked to ATT and cannot be used on another service with another SIM. You should contact ATT and see what they say, and also peruse the T600 forum for all the notes on the problems with locked T600s. You need to test this in the USA first with another SIM (e.g. T-Mo or Cingular) and see if it works before getting on the plane.
  4.    #4  
    Actually, it was a Cingular phone when I bought it on eBay, but was not locked. Is there a chance AT&T locked it when they switched the phone to their service?

    Patrick
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by pbrinton
    Actually, it was a Cingular phone when I bought it on eBay, but was not locked. Is there a chance AT&T locked it when they switched the phone to their service?

    Patrick
    No, There is no way for AT&T to lock your phone when you switch the service... You just bought the sim and pop it in...
    TREO 600 ROCKS !!!! I gave up my Zaurus sl-5500 and my Motorola v60i for it.


    ***********************************
    "Willing is not enough; we must do. Knowing is not enough; we must apply." -- Bruce Lee
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by olavf
    Hi Pat,

    I'm doing the same thing, and that's exactly what I'm doing. You can find them on-line before you go, or buy one when you get there (which is what I'm planning to do).
    That's exactly right. I'm currently in Prague for a few months using my T600 like a charm. The best thing to do is to purchase a prepaid SIM card when you arrive (there will probably be several cellular vendors in the airport). That will give you a local number in the UK. You can recharge your minutes with a phone call or at many ATMs in Europe, or purchase top-up cards in most convenience stores. Different vendors will have different plans. T-Mobile is expensive but has wide coverage and excellent customer service throughout most of Europe, and several plans (switching from the standard out-of-box plan can make calls a little cheaper if you will be visiting several countries). You will be able to use MMS and GPRS on most prepaid SIMs as well but may need to contact your SIM vendor to have those services activated.

    As a general rule, most prepaid cards allow free incoming calls and text messages. So the best way to get in touch with home is to do the quick "call me back" thing and let them float the bill - it's a whole lot cheaper for them than it is for you. International SMS is fairly affordable as well.

    Hope this helps!

    -S
  7.    #7  
    Thanks to all who responded. I did in fact end up buying an Orange SIM and 10 pounds worth of service (which was the minimum available) and it is working great. I mainly wanted it for receiving calls, so I did not need much actual time. I was happy to discover that Orange (and I gather all UK providers) do not charge for incoming calls, which makes it a good deal.

    Now if they would just extend service to the Underground system I would be in heaven!

    The other strange thing is that phone numbers here seem to consist of a random number of digits, and are often printed just as a string of digits without spaces, which is very hard on my not-so-young eyes (and brain). On the whole, though, service seems to be if anything better than in California.

    Rule Britannia, what??

    Patrick Brinton

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