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  1. #41  
    Originally posted by reinder.rustema
    Reading your scenario I think the best way to sell this phone is to all those people who have a Palm, used to have one or once considered getting one. That is Joe rather than Jane. Although I also know a few Janes with a Palm. This Treo 600 should be the replacement for their PDA. They will spread the word rather than the sales representative.

    I know many people who have considered a Palm. They just didn't like the idea of scribbling with a stylus on a little screen, didn't like carrying a second device besides the phone, didn't like the geeky appearance of it.

    And the size? The thing should not be heavy, but small or ultrasmall is for many people not much of an issue I have the impression.
    I agree with you, but Handspring seems to have their sights set higher. They want people (who have NOT considered a PDA) to look at the Treo and accept it as a smartphone.

    They want new marketshare. Sure, they expect to get upgraders like you and me, but they also want NEW customers (including those that are primarily looking for a cell phone).

    To get them, they have to play the game to win.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  2. #42  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget
    I agree with you, but Handspring seems to have their sights set higher. They want people (who have NOT considered a PDA) to look at the Treo and accept it as a smartphone.
    I don't agree with this. Yes, they're looking for new customers, but they're not looking for "average" consumers. They're looking for more business customers. The price point they're setting this at demonstrates that, IMO. Average consumers aren't going to be spending $400 on a phone no matter what it does.

    Scott
    Now THIS is the future of smartphones.
  3. Rusty J's Avatar
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    #43  
    Or, at least not the kind of customer that one can build a business plan around.
    I paid $400 for my (unlocked, non-GPRS) 270 back in January, to replace my Palm i705.
    What motivated me to get the Treo was that it was a Palm OS device from someone other than Palm (at the time, I still held a grudge against them for the way they handled the PalmNet rate increases for the i705), it was cheaper than the then-upcoming Palm Tungsten W, and most of all it was not carrier-locked or carrier-specific (did I mention the PalmNet rate increases for the i705?).
    I was looking for a data-centric device, not a phone. Nor was I terribly happy with the idea of a keyboard. I'd spent 2 years using Grafitti, and NOBODY was going to take away my stylus, unless they pried it from my cold, dead, writer's-cramped fingers!
    (Hey, I didn't know any better at the time!)

    I purchased it and made it work despite an almost complete lack of selling by the retailer[1], very little manufacturer support [2], even less wireless-provder support [3], and practically no ISP support [4]

    It took a great deal of skilled effort, research, and a little luck to get it to work. If I weren't highly motivated and didn't know exactly what I was doing, I would have given up in frustration early on, or never even considered it.
    They almost couldn't have done a worse marketing job if they'd tried.

    [1] The staff of Fry's Electronics, Las Vegas, NV, knew amost nothing about the Treo 270 (this included the cellphone salesperson, who had no connection to the PDA department).
    [2] Handspring tech support did direct me to the TreoCentral website for the Unofficial GPRS Upgrade, (while admonishing me that it would void my warranty if I installed it).
    [3]AT&T's 3G tech support folks were as helpful as they could have been, considering that they had NO idea what a Treo 270 was -- it would be another six months before AT&T agreed to support it.
    [4] AOL. 'Nuff said.
    -Rusty
    Blackjack, Tilt; Treo 90, 270-680; Palm Vx, i705, T|T3, iQue 3200; Nokia N800, E71
  4. #44  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    I don't agree with this. Yes, they're looking for new customers, but they're not looking for "average" consumers. They're looking for more business customers. The price point they're setting this at demonstrates that, IMO. Average consumers aren't going to be spending $400 on a phone no matter what it does.

    Scott
    What I said was that they're looking for new customers that are primarily looking for a phone (versus a PDA). That's the population that they're trying to attract, in addition to their established base customer (the PDA professional).

    I agree that the price is high. (Of course, I've seen just as many high-end phones (non-Palm OS) that cost just as much (some even higher), but don't DO as much.) The idea was to attract new business.

    And I think I stated in an earlier post that to reach non-technical ("average") people they'll need to work on their marketing.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
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