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  1.    #41  
    Originally posted by m00se


    Here's my information, and the link below to prove it:

    Top Individual Holder:
    Hawkins, Jeffrey 37,292,558

    Top Institutional Holder:
    BENCHMARK CAPITAL MGMT  4,533,214

    (Please note that in my previous thread I specifically said "Company" not "Individual," never disputing Mr. Hawkins' impressive number of shares.)

    Link:
    http://quicken.multexinvestor.com/MG...er&Ticker=HAND
    I don't have a link to what I sent. It's a data service I use for my job. I think you meant "Institutional" instead of "Company." Kleiner, Perkins Caufield & Buyers LP is a company but they are considered insiders. They hold 14.8MM shares.
    m00se
  2. #42  
    Wow this person needs to be demoted. Talk about simple-minded. I do not recall ever using a cell phone with a red and green button to answer and hang-up.

    Originally posted by rosswords
    In one meeting, recalls Handspring engineer Mitch Allen, a carrier's representatives took one look at the Treo and asked, "Where are the red and green buttons?"
    My life is in my Treo... Where is yours?
  3. #43  
    I have said this before. But I think Handspring did the right thing in leaving the organizer business. There is no way that they could have competed with the likes of Sony and now Dell. They were losing their number two market position very fast. Personally, I cannot see myself going back to an organizer only device.
    My life is in my Treo... Where is yours?
  4.    #44  
    Originally posted by yardie
    Wow this person needs to be demoted. Talk about simple-minded. I do not recall ever using a cell phone with a red and green button to answer and hang-up.

    You've never used a cell phone with "Talk" and "End" buttons?
  5. #45  
    Originally posted by yardie
    I have said this before. But I think Handspring did the right thing in leaving the organizer business. There is no way that they could have competed with the likes of Sony and now Dell. They were losing their number two market position very fast. Personally, I cannot see myself going back to an organizer only device.
    yardie,

    I agree with you completely regarding never going back to separate devices. The problem is that there doesn't seem to be enough converts like us in the market. The article brings up a very good point, the management of HS grossly over-estimated the potential growth of the smartphone segment and it has suffered tremendously b/c of it. Ultimately I think HS was wise to think that getting 3-4% of a 350 million mobile handset market was better than 20% of a 12-15 million pda market. The only question is when will most of those mobile handsets being sold become smartphones and can HS last long enough to reap the benefits if and when that happens? In this regard I think HS made a tactical error by completely ceding its pda base. If they had come out with a OS 5 Prism II or even a OS 5 T90, I think they would have been in much better shape than they are now. I believe they could have sitll focused on pushing the company toward smartphones w/o totally giving up on pdas, especially since they could have eked out a few more dollars with one or two successful products. As a result, they're now a vastly shrunken company that must provide support to large base of visor owners that it gets no income from, but yet cannot totally alienate b/c t wants to try to convince them to buys its treos. Alas, it didn't have to be either/or situation IMHO.... But lets just wait see what HS can do now.

    Also as a side note. It seems to me that if HS really wanted to succeed in the smartphone segment, it consider all options including the possibility of licensing other operating systems besides PalmOS. Symbian would seem like a logical choice b/c of it pre-eminant market share and growth. What do ya'll think?
  6. #46  
    gfunk, I think that Handspring (and, perhaps, Hawkins in particular) misjudged two things about the smartphone market:
    1) That carriers would be easily wowed by their products and would all jump on board.
    2) That a large number of consumers would be willing to shell out $500 for these things, thus giving Handspring a big profit margin.

    Doubling back to a previous point I made, I wonder if Hawkins would have been so gung ho about dumping the Visor line and going exclusively with wireless Treos if he thought carriers would need to sell them at <$300 initially to get a large number of consumers to buy in.

    I, too, think wireless is the way to go. But I think he jumped the gun on dumping the Visors. I also think that even in a wireless world, there will be a certain group of customers who will prefer having a dual-device arrangement which allows their PDA to provide larger screen real estate.

    I also think that Hawkins ignored the newer Palm OS revisions and higher-res screens for far too long. Imagine a 320x320 Visor w/silkscreen Graffiti and Springboard slot a year and a half ago or a 320x480 Visor w/virtual input panel and Springboard slot 9 months ago. Both would have been easily doable and, I bet, very good sellers.

    Regarding the issue of exploring alternative OSes, I'll reiterate my previous position: Handspring's founders were the originators of the Palm OS. They probably had the know-how to start from scratch and create a brand spankin' new OS optimized for smartphones. To me, this would have been the best decision. If they were going to go with an existing small-device OS, I think the Palm OS was the right choice. Remember that even the Symbian OS has its roots in non-wireless devices. This is why I'm so interested in the Danger devices as these are the first devices truly built from the ground up around wireless functionality (unless you want to include the much more limited RIM devices, which were really built originally around e-mail specifically).

    Scott
  7. #47  
    The advantage I see in using the Palm OS for the Treo was that a whole group of people who had/have Palms could easily migrate to the Treos. Most don't. Here in Jakarta, the well wired executive has a Palm and a Nokia, usually the 9210. A Treo is a much better choice, but it is hard to get people to give up their Nokias!

    I am playing with a Smartphone/PDA and it definatley has a long way to go. My Treo is a good phone that also serves as a good PDA. The Smartphone is a good PDA that barely works as a phone. And SMS is even worse.
  8. #48  
    W.r.t. looking up Grantee codes - I believe there's a grantee search somewhere on or near the same FCC web page I posted the link to - just typed in "handspring" if I remember correctly.
  9. #49  
    Trying to remember....hmmm... I do not recall. Even if I did, it did not have red and green buttons.

    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    You've never used a cell phone with "Talk" and "End" buttons?
    My life is in my Treo... Where is yours?
  10. #50  
    GFunkMagic,

    I see what you are saying. However, I do not think HS have/had the resources to provide R&D for several products. This is why Jeff Hawkin's "unifocus" view won out over Ed Colligan's. If Handspring had the resources of say PALM. You can bet your bottom dollar that they would still be a player in the PDA space.


    Originally posted by gfunkmagic


    yardie,

    I agree with you completely regarding never going back to separate devices. The problem is that there doesn't seem to be enough converts like us in the market. The article brings up a very good point, the management of HS grossly over-estimated the potential growth of the smartphone segment and it has suffered tremendously b/c of it. Ultimately I think HS was wise to think that getting 3-4% of a 350 million mobile handset market was better than 20% of a 12-15 million pda market. The only question is when will most of those mobile handsets being sold become smartphones and can HS last long enough to reap the benefits if and when that happens? In this regard I think HS made a tactical error by completely ceding its pda base. If they had come out with a OS 5 Prism II or even a OS 5 T90, I think they would have been in much better shape than they are now. I believe they could have sitll focused on pushing the company toward smartphones w/o totally giving up on pdas, especially since they could have eked out a few more dollars with one or two successful products. As a result, they're now a vastly shrunken company that must provide support to large base of visor owners that it gets no income from, but yet cannot totally alienate b/c t wants to try to convince them to buys its treos. Alas, it didn't have to be either/or situation IMHO.... But lets just wait see what HS can do now.

    Also as a side note. It seems to me that if HS really wanted to succeed in the smartphone segment, it consider all options including the possibility of licensing other operating systems besides PalmOS. Symbian would seem like a logical choice b/c of it pre-eminant market share and growth. What do ya'll think?
    My life is in my Treo... Where is yours?
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