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  1.    #1  
    http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/p...etPhonesPR.asp
    Click through to the high resolution images.

    There have been other posts about how big these phones are, and I agree. The Treo itself took some getting used to, and I'm still worried about dropping it it's so big.

    But the functionality has got to be amazing. For all those times your treo freezes (for example because AvantGo tries to download something while you're in the subway), or is just slow (like when you go back in the web browser and the page should still be in the cache, but it takes forever to redraw the screen), this should be the ticket. Palm OS 5.x? Forget it. PPC is the bomb squad.

    Now if only there is some quirk that makes it fall flat in the marketplace, and I can get one on the cheap! Part of the reason I just bought my treo is the fact that it has been proven for 6 mos. or so, and it has finally dropped significantly in price. Here's to rapid depreciation of the Hitachi.
  2. #2  
    At last a PocktPC with a keyboard.
    That sounds promizing...
  3. #3  
    Looks damn fine

    Are HS et al destined to low volume Communicator sales to a niche market of PalmOS diehards? Have they set the standard only to be steamrolled by the major PPC players?
    Maybe...
    probably?
    www.gsmworld.com
  4. mrjoec's Avatar
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    #4  
    Did you notice where they put the numbers on the Hitachi keyboard? Wow, that seems pretty shortsighted.

    It's bad enough people complain about the Treo not having a standard phone keypad. (A lot of people still think you need to tap the screen keys to dial, instead of the number keys on the board.) At least the Treo has numbers in a standard three-column configuration, so you can dial without looking (once you find your bearings). On the Hitachi, tapping the screen buttons with your finger seems like a better option than typing across the entire top row of keys.

    It's little details like this that put the Treo way ahead of its competition, still. Until these "smart" phones are thought through on the level of practicality (i.e. average people can use it for phone calls without needing lessons, and all the basic functions and features of current popular cell phones are implemented) they'll never penetrate the general marketplace.
    mrjoec
    www.joecieplinski.com
  5. #5  
    It's good to see someone in the PPC camp "trying" to think outside the box, but this thing just looks like too many compromises rolled into one. This is where Palm's square screen "limitation" actually turns out to be an advantage. Trying to stick a rectangular screen with a thumbboard ends up giving you a device which will have a screen which is smaller than most PPC's (and, thus, decreased usability), larger overall device size, and a very top-heavy design. Can you imagine trying to hold this thing while standing up and thumb-typing on it? This is what really kills it for me. I just can't imagine that the top-heaviness of it won't be a major, major issue.

    Scott
  6. #6  
    These look nice, but boy do they look bulky! I certainly wouldn't want to carry either of them.

    The Treo is remarkably small and light for what it does. More than a year after it came out, it still is, IMO, the king of the convergence devices. I also think that it could remain so for a while even if no new models come out from HS. The HS design team did a remarkable job in making a great set of tradeoffs to create a very practical device.
    Last edited by silverado; 03/20/2003 at 04:51 AM.
  7. #7  
    I can never picture myself buying anything related to pocket pc. processor hogs, memory hogs, everything including bluetooth locked.
    palm all the way.
  8. #8  
    I just don't get it. You're right, the Hitachi looks a nice bit of kit, but it's HUUUUUGE. It has about as much design finesse as a Nokia 9210.

    Mind you, while the Treo still has the best form factor on the market, it's by no means perfect. The Treo flip totally wastes the extra space it offers by being just an inert piece of plastic. Now, if the screen was on the flip itself -- eg. like the NEC e808 (http://www.three.co.uk/explore/handsets/detail.omp) -- there would be a lot more screen space available, as it wouldn't have to share space with the keyboard. And this doesn't compromise the size of the unit when closed.

    I was very close to buying an NEC e808 but rejected it because it's still not a high-res screen, and it doesn't have my preferred OS (Symbian). I'll just have to hang on for Nokia's Treo-killer!
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by Loccy
    I just don't get it. You're right, the Hitachi looks a nice bit of kit, but it's HUUUUUGE. It has about as much design finesse as a Nokia 9210.

    Mind you, while the Treo still has the best form factor on the market, it's by no means perfect. The Treo flip totally wastes the extra space it offers by being just an inert piece of plastic. Now, if the screen was on the flip itself -- eg. like the NEC e808 (http://www.three.co.uk/explore/handsets/detail.omp) -- there would be a lot more screen space available, as it wouldn't have to share space with the keyboard. And this doesn't compromise the size of the unit when closed.

    I was very close to buying an NEC e808 but rejected it because it's still not a high-res screen, and it doesn't have my preferred OS (Symbian). I'll just have to hang on for Nokia's Treo-killer!
    These discussions just show how tough it is to design something that's all things to all people I see what you mean about the e808, but the Treo has the advantage of seeing the screen while the lid is closed. That's very handy and I'm not sure I'd be happy if I had to give it up.
  10.    #10  
    Originally posted by mrjoec
    Did you notice where they put the numbers on the Hitachi keyboard? Wow, that seems pretty shortsighted.
    Yep, that is what killed the blackberry phone. Too many people complained, "How do I dial 1-800-USA-RAIL"? Amazingly shortsighted.
  11. #11  
    Palm did the same thing with the Tungsten W. I think how Handspring has postioned the number (and the * and #) keys is very smart. It's amazing to me that none of the other manufacturers have copied this.

    Scott
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by rollins

    Yep, that is what killed the blackberry phone. Too many people complained, "How do I dial 1-800-USA-RAIL"? Amazingly shortsighted.
    I've always thought that it would make sense to have something like if you press the option button at the time you press the first letter, it will dial the number corresponding to letter. So if you type "bsmit" it will call up bob smith, but if you type "option-b smit" it will begin dialing 27648
  13. mrjoec's Avatar
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    #13  
    It actually works even better than that. If Bob Smith's number is in your contact list, then it will prepare to dial bob when you type bsm. But if you want to dial 27648 etc, or some other number that's not in your book, just start dialing that, and once you get past the point where you are typing numbers that don't correspond to anyone, it will switch automatically (without pressing option) to the numbers. I think that's really smart.

    99 times out of a hundred, I'm going to dial someone whose name I know, not whose number I know. But, on occasion, when I want to dial someone not in my phone book, I just have to dial out the whole number, which won't match anyone's name, and therefore will switch the phone into numerical mode automatically.

    I think a lot of people miss the fact that Handspring was smart enough to have the number pad override the letters when appropriate, with or without the option key. The phone number fields in the contact list, for instance, automatically set your phone into number lock when you are entering them.

    The Treo's greatest advantage, and ultimately what will prove to be it's greatest contribution to the "smart phone" market, is its attention to detail in real-world use. Handspring did a really good job with thinking about the user, and making the experience the center of the product. Sure, they missed the boat on a few items (like the mute button) the first time around, but they quickly fixed most of those. And I'm sure the next Treo will improve upon the current user experience even more.

    Hitachi and Sony and Compaq are still building boxes with feature sets. They're not building experiences. True, some people buy only based on feature sets. These are the same people that think Megahertz is the ultimate measure of a computer's ability, and that a Mustang is a better car than a Volkswagen, because it has a faster top speed.

    The Treo kills them all in experience. Now, if only the carriers would do their part to make their side of the experience more enjoyable, Handspring wouldn't be in financial turmoil right now.
    mrjoec
    www.joecieplinski.com
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by mrjoec
    It actually works even better than that. If Bob Smith's number is in your contact list, then it will prepare to dial bob when you type bsm. But if you want to dial 27648 etc, or some other number that's not in your book, just start dialing that, and once you get past the point where you are typing numbers that don't correspond to anyone, it will switch automatically (without pressing option) to the numbers. I think that's really smart.
    Thanks, that's written in the manual, and to my knowledge every Treo user knows that. What I was suggesting was an improvement on that for dialing numbers like "1-800-Collect" where you need to use the letters. I think if you type the first number combined with the option key, a new dialing setup should be invoked where the letters pressed are translated into numbers, not used to look up names.
  15. #15  
    Really once it has determined that there is no match it should just let any letter key enter the corresponding touch-tone number

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