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  1. #21  
    OK, I think I got this right. Based on the dimensions listed in Samsung's flash ad and the dimensions that Handspring lists for the Treo 300 on its web site, I created a picture comparing the two devices where they should be in the proper scale. If someone things I messed this up, let me know. Here it is:

    http://www.hipnetic.com/geek/samsung_vs_treo.gif

    The Samsung on the left shows how the two devices compare in size when open (which isn't overly important, IMO). The picture of the Samsung on the right, however, shows how much smaller the screen size is compared to the Treo's. IMO, things will look very sharp but the device will be too difficult to use. Imagine actually using a high-res application (like a spreadsheet) and not only trying to read the data but actually trying to position your cursor on the line. Better sharpen that stylus tip!

    I sure hope Handspring doesn't try to play "me-too" with their next device and succumb to the "analysts" who say that the Treo is too big. Unless they follow a design similar to the designs I mocked up, a smaller Treo would probably mean a smaller screen and a smaller thumbboard.

    Scott
  2. #22  
    BTW, I just updated my picture to include a side-by-side of just the screens, so that you can see the size difference even better. Again, this assumes that I scaled the two devices properly. It's hard to tell with the dimensions supplied by the companies as you never really know how accurate they are, plus some companies will measure width at the widest part of the body, while others may measure the width at the narrowest part of the body.

    Scott
  3. #23  
    Possible bad news...

    According to this (http://news.com.com/2100-1045-992479.html?tag=fd_top) CNET news article, this Samsung phone will be the first smartphone to use OS5. Accordinging to one site, this phone won't be out until the 3rd quarter (July-September time frame). So, if all of this is true, it would mean that either Handspring's next phone won't be out till after that and/or it might still be pre-OS5 Dragonball device.

    Scott
  4. #24  
    Originally posted by Scott R
    Possible bad news...

    According to this (http://news.com.com/2100-1045-992479.html?tag=fd_top) CNET news article, this Samsung phone will be the first smartphone to use OS5. Accordinging to one site, this phone won't be out until the 3rd quarter (July-September time frame). So, if all of this is true, it would mean that either Handspring's next phone won't be out till after that and/or it might still be pre-OS5 Dragonball device.

    Scott
    I'm sure they mean first announced phone as they don't have full visibility of all pipelines. Handspring could still announce an OS 5 device later and ship it earlier.
  5. #25  
    Originally posted by silverado

    I'm sure they mean first announced phone as they don't have full visibility of all pipelines. Handspring could still announce an OS 5 device later and ship it earlier.
    The "they" referenced in this article is PalmSource. AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $they$ $would$ $know$ $what$ $is$ $being$ $planned$ $by$ $their$ $licensees$. $But$ $3rd$ $quarter$ $is$ $definitely$ $a$ $little$ $ways$ $away$, $so$ $anything$ $is$ $possible$.

    Scott
  6. #26  
    Originally posted by Scott R

    The "they" referenced in this article is PalmSource. AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $they$ $would$ $know$ $what$ $is$ $being$ $planned$ $by$ $their$ $licensees$. $But$ $3rd$ $quarter$ $is$ $definitely$ $a$ $little$ $ways$ $away$, $so$ $anything$ $is$ $possible$.

    Scott
    Here is the original press release. I think the CNET statement that it "will be the first" phone to use OS 5 is misleading. The original press release says that it IS the first phone to use it. However the phone isn't out there yet. To me this leaves the door open to other announcements. When these phones will actually be in people's hands doesn't follow the announcement order.
  7. #27  
    Originally posted by silverado
    Here is the original press release. I think the CNET statement that it "will be the first" phone to use OS 5 is misleading.
    Thanks for that link. Yeah, that makes things as clear as mud again. Hopefully, HS will beat the 3rd quarter with a next-gen thumbboard-enabled device.

    Scott
  8. #28  
    Originally posted by Scott R

    Thanks for that link. Yeah, that makes things as clear as mud again. Hopefully, HS will beat the 3rd quarter with a next-gen thumbboard-enabled device.

    Scott
    Judging by the lag between the Treo's announcement and delivery (which was rushed-witness no GPRS support), that's a pipe dream.
  9. #29  
    Originally posted by KRamsauer
    Judging by the lag between the Treo's announcement and delivery (which was rushed-witness no GPRS support), that's a pipe dream.
    By the same token, note the relatively short time between the announcement of a Sprint model and the release of the Treo 300. A big difference between now and the period leading to the release of the first Treo (and the late release of GPRS) is that the company now has a base of sofware and experience on which to build. This wasn't the case before. I think (hope?) that these factors can elevate this to more than just a pipe dream.

    Incidentally, I don't expect a revolutionary design change. The form factor can not change much if we're going to retain the keyboard, because any smaller keyboard would be impractical. A smaller display would also start to become kind of strange. That speaks to the width of the device. As to thickness, I think that even if it is possible to create a thinner device, it would be harder to handle than the current device if the width remains the same for the above reasons. The Treo now is remarkably small IMO for what it does.

    I think the additions would be improved OS, useability, ability to add cards, etc. But the overall size will probably remain similar.

    Handspring seems to excel in their tradeoff process. We have many gripes about the Treo and it seems less technologically advanced than other offerings, however show me any other device out there that is a serious competitor to the Treo in its practicality and usability.

    I predict that the new device from HS will underwhelm those of us that are asking for everything but the kitchen sink to go into it. However it will probably be one of the most practical devices out there and beat the competition that way.

    The new Samsung device, for example, looks and sounds very sexy, but is it a serious device for the power palm and communicator user? I don't think so. With its small screen and awkward input (with no grafitti area or keyboard) I think it would appeal more to normal phone users who want some PIM features. But for the price, why would they choose a palm-based device while many other cheaper devices that can fullfill their requirements exist? HS's new model would probably leave some of these features behind (like a digital camera), but streamline the most important ones like screen quality, text input, phone integration, etc. Making the device a bit more rugged would also be nice.
  10. #30  
    silverado, I agree with your comments on the Samsung device, but my recollection is that HS hinted in their conference call that they would be modifying the form factor of the Treo and I believe there was some comment about one-handed operation. This would lead me to believe that they may be coming up with a device that may be less wide, which would be a mistake, IMO, because the thumbboard is already too small for my tastes. I'm hoping they put more thought into the new design then "let's make it more narrow so it feels more like a regular phone." Obviously, if they use a design similar to one of the more unconvential designs I mocked up, I think everyone's needs could be better met.

    Scott
  11. #31  
    Scott,

    I hope those changes are more ergonomic , e.g., sleeker lines, a molded shape that fits better in one's hands, than things like doing away with the keyboard or making it smaller and less usable. I think HS recognizes that the keyboard is a huge draw.

    Your designs are nice, but I think they would have to add to the thickness of the device. The Treo is remarkably small and thin for all that it does and the usability that it provides.
  12. #32  
    Scott,

    I hope those changes are more ergonomic , e.g., sleeker lines, a molded shape that fits better in one's hands, than things like doing away with the keyboard or making it smaller and less usable. I think HS recognizes that the keyboard is a huge draw.

    Your designs are nice, but I think they would have to add to the thickness of the device. The Treo is remarkably small and thin for all that it does and the usability that it provides.
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