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  1.    #1  
    This (or something similiar) looks to be my next phone.

    I imagine the build quality from Motorola far surpasses Handspring. Even though I've used their products since the first Visor's came out... I don't see them as being around much longer.


    http://www.bargainpda.com/default.as...wComments=true
  2.    #2  
  3. #3  
    beautiful looking phone and i agree that motorola would probably build a much higher quality unit. but still no keyboard. i could never go back.
    Change is a challenge to the adventurous, an opportunity to the alert, a threat to the insecure.
  4. #4  
    A friend of mine, who works for Motorola, was given one device last week, to beta test it.
    I haven't seen it yet, but he told me that it was simply amazing.

    I can't wait to put my hand on this device and see for myself!
  5.    #5  
    heh... you know... you're right I've become so used to the kb that I didn't even notice it wasn't on that motorola phone. That would be a real sticking point on purchasing it.
  6. #6  
    While I am a big supporter of linux and anything that might knock M$ off its perch, the lack of applications, right now, is an issue for this phone. I have to agree, no keyboard is a big problem. Moreover, this is a produce that, according to the link, isn't likely to hit the US until next year. By that time, I strongly suspect HS will have its next model to market.

    As for HS future viability, I wouldn't bet too strongly against them. They have succeeded in making their products the standard against which all other smartphones are being measured and have successfully restructured their operations to get their phones in many more retail outlets and removed most of the operational risks from their business. We will see in a few years, but don't be surprised if they are the dominant player in the smartphone market when everything shakes out.

    Gargoyle
  7.    #7  
    I have to disagree with your assesment of the lack of linux software.... (www.freshmeat.net & www.sourceforge.net to name a few)

    However, while Handspring has made great strides in the "smart phone" market... they're QC MUST improve drastically for them to continue as a viable entity in the telecommunications/pda market

    Again you're right to point out the KB... Without a doubt, any future phone I purchase will have the thumbpad.
  8. #8  
    Motorola builds good quality phones?
    My friend is the HEAD Technical supervisor of motorola phones in my country. and his using an ericcson phone. lol
    Motorola has in my opinion, the worst interface, the worst user friendliness, the ugliest phones and lowest build quality. thats why its fallen from no.1 to no,2 and this year is likely to be no.3 behind nokia and samsung.
    those who uses motorola either have no choice or havent tried a nokia/samsung/ericcson phones.
  9. #9  
    I think we will see a lot of Linux PDA/phones in the future simply because the OS is an Open Standard, which in turn, promotes development. There are a host of companies either dabbling in the Linux PDA/phone market or in full blown production.

    I hope we see a lot more choice and soon.
  10. #10  
    While there are any number of projects and things to download under linux, to call most of these applications might be a stretch. In fact, most of these fall into the for developers/programmers by developers/programmers category. They are definitely not for the average user, or usually even the non-programmer heavy user. Before linux can become a true mainstream OS on the desktop, much less something smartphone users will take to it will need readily accessible, easy to use and install, well documentad applications for things people actually use. Hopefully it gets there soon, because I would love to have a M$ free desktop and would even seriously consider a well made smartphone running linux.

    Gargoyle
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by Japorms
    [BMotorola has in my opinion, the worst interface, the worst user friendliness, the ugliest phones and lowest build quality. those who uses motorola either have no choice or havent tried a nokia/samsung/ericcson phones. [/B]
    I would agree with you that Mororola produces pretty lousy mobile / cell phones: their user interface is reknown to be one of the worst around.

    But I will totally desagree as far as Motorola' smartphones are concerned.
    As I said before, I haven't tried the A760, but I had, a year or two ago an Accompli 008 and was very happy with it.
    It was very well built, its user-interface was suprizingly well designed and the reception / sound quality was amazing.
    A great device.

    I have the best feeling for this new Accompli.
    I only question the choice of OS: Linux.
    Why did they go for Linux instead of Symbian (which would make sense for Motorola) or Palm or Pocket PC, like everybody else?

    Too bad there is no built-in keyboard (one of the reasons I dropped the A008)...
  12. #12  
    Originally posted by gargoylejps
    While there are any number of projects and things to download under linux, to call most of these applications might be a stretch. In fact, most of these fall into the for developers/programmers by developers/programmers category. They are definitely not for the average user, or usually even the non-programmer heavy user. Before linux can become a true mainstream OS on the desktop, much less something smartphone users will take to it will need readily accessible, easy to use and install, well documentad applications for things people actually use. Hopefully it gets there soon, because I would love to have a M$ free desktop and would even seriously consider a well made smartphone running linux.

    Gargoyle
    Hmmmm... I'm writing this on my Linux desktop (RedHat 8.0) using Mozilla web browser. I can read/write MS office apps with my Open Office Applications (write, draw, presentation, spreadsheet), I can instant message all my disparate friends with Gaim (combining AIM, Yahoo, Jabber, etc.). I can read, write postscript, PDF, whatever. I can sync my Treo to Jpilot and/or Evolution (an integrated app like Outlook) and on and on... My kids use Linux at home even. Linux could use better, more integrated installation and configuration tools (although Windows configuration tools leave something to be desired too...
  13. #13  
    Even if you could take an existing Linux app, recompile it as-is, and run it successfully on a Linux smartphone, would it really offer a good user experience? Most Linux apps are designed for a desktop environment. You can't take an app that was originally designed around an 800x600 desktop and expect it to be usable in a 120x200 (or whatever the resolution) smartphone. And that's just the screen resolution issue. You also have to deal with the fact that most apps are designed to be used with a keyboard and mouse. The bottom line is that the best applications will need to be designed from the ground up for this phone and making existing apps work well will require significant changes to the code/UI.

    Scott
  14. #14  
    Well, if the application developers layered their design such that the I/O portion is abstracted and easily replaceable by a new underlying module, that woudn't be difficult. But, considering that efficiency is the goal of many applications, they would remove such layering as much as possible.
  15. #15  
    Yes, if you know where to look; for most basic things there is, somewhere an application that runs on linux. However, the fact still remains for the average users, the unclean masses if you will, linux applications are not generally available through distribution channels they trust. Fortunately, this is slowly (too slowly for me) changing. It will be a happy day when Best Buy partitions off a whole section just for linux applications (yes I know they do sell a couple linux products there, ie 1 or 2 distributions and Star Office). Still, this does not change the support and documentation problems plaguing linux apps, as in both are usually poor to non-existent (at least in terms of what your average computer customer would be comfortable with). Again, this seems to be slowly changing, thankfully, as more established firms get in the linux game and consumer software starts to trickle out. Moreover, as a previous poster pointed out, applications designed for the requirements of handhelds are even fewer than those available for linux on the desktop. Honestly, I believe linux will eventually win the OS war, if for no other reason than no one can fight its economics, but we are probably 10 to 20 years away from it dominating.

    JMHO

    Gargoyle

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