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  1. i2y4n's Avatar
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       #1  
    Pulled from an article on The Verge about OnLive:

    "Then, in June of this year, Hewlett-Packard came calling.

    An HP executive gave Perlman a personal check for $10,000 to open negotiations, and then offered $15 million for an exclusive 60-day window to make a deal. HP was primarily interested in OnLive's Cloud Desktop platform, perhaps seeing it as a way to revitalize their enterprise tablet business. Allegedly, HP already had clients lined up for the idea, and employees worried the games business would fall by the wayside. About a month ago, though, employees discovered that the deal had fallen through, and management hadn't said a thing. The excuse was allegedly that HP's stock price had fallen and that the company couldn't afford OnLive anymore. Morale fell yet again, and more employees left."

    OnLive lost: how the paradise of streaming games was undone by one man's ego | The Verge
  2. i2y4n's Avatar
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       #2  
    Wow, what an interesting read. I am really excited to hear about HP's aggressive involvement in a possible OnLive acquisition. Perhaps HP really is committed to webOS (GRAM, or at least mobile). I would like to hear a plan come from them shortly to help ease my concerns.

    $15 million dollars just to negotiate!?! WOW
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by i2y4n View Post
    Pulled from an article on The Verge about OnLive:

    "Then, in June of this year, Hewlett-Packard came calling.

    An HP executive gave Perlman a personal check for $10,000 to open negotiations, and then offered $15 million for an exclusive 60-day window to make a deal. HP was primarily interested in OnLive's Cloud Desktop platform, perhaps seeing it as a way to revitalize their enterprise tablet business. Allegedly, HP already had clients lined up for the idea, and employees worried the games business would fall by the wayside. About a month ago, though, employees discovered that the deal had fallen through, and management hadn't said a thing. The excuse was allegedly that HP's stock price had fallen and that the company couldn't afford OnLive anymore. Morale fell yet again, and more employees left."

    OnLive lost: how the paradise of streaming games was undone by one man's ego | The Verge
    Interesting quote.

    But the excuse sounds ridiculous for the deal size and so do the rest of the monetary details, I doubt any money was exchanged for the "window" and the personal check sounds like malarky also. If HP came calling, more likely they entered into talks but something made them reject it-- perhaps they pulled out after seeing skydrive. Also this was around the time that MSFT debuted Surface and that disruption might have had something to do with it.
  4. i2y4n's Avatar
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       #4  
    Even if they numbers are made up or exaggerated this is the first I've heard of HP negotiating with other companies in relationship to their future computing plans. Its definitely something I've been hoping to see.
  5. #5  
    Companies enter into talks all the time. The strangeness of the details of the story makes me doubt this is what really happened (Maybe even Onlive begged HP to come by and bail them out and HP gave a cursory look and then walked away, who knows what happened if Onlive were desperate enough?). Don't mean to be mean but if I were you and I liked webOS, I would focus on the real nuts and bolts tremendous work that the webos ports devs are doing with LunaCE today and I would consider donating. They are attempting to wrap up work to put LunaCE into beta, if you haven't seen all the cool features, there are some vids going around.
  6. i2y4n's Avatar
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       #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    Companies enter into talks all the time. The strangeness of the details of the story makes me doubt this is what really happened (Maybe even Onlive begged HP to come by and bail them out and HP gave a cursory look and then walked away, who knows what happened if Onlive were desperate enough?). Don't mean to be mean but if I were you and I liked webOS, I would focus on the real nuts and bolts tremendous work that the webos ports devs are doing with LunaCE today and I would consider donating. They are attempting to wrap up work to put LunaCE into beta, if you haven't seen all the cool features, there are some vids going around.
    If you were in OnLive's position and extremely desperate (this article doesn't give that impression to me though) would you really ask HP to bail you out? HP has zero cloud gaming experience, why ask HP, especially after Leo's mess.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by i2y4n View Post
    If you were in OnLive's position and extremely desperate (this article doesn't give that impression to me though) would you really ask HP to bail you out? HP has zero cloud gaming experience, why ask HP, especially after Leo's mess.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    ?? On-live fired all its workers, closed it doors and the founder started a different company and hired a skeleton crew. Heh, heh, as I write this, are you sure they don't share an affinity to HP?

    Anyway LunaCE is in beta now, if you want to look at it.
  8. i2y4n's Avatar
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       #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    ?? On-live fired all its workers, closed it doors and the founder started a different company and hired a skeleton crew. Heh, heh, as I write this, are you sure they don't share an affinity to HP?

    Anyway LunaCE is in beta now, if you want to look at it.
    Haha, HP's Leopocalypse is not something that anyone should emulate.

    I know about LunaCE (voted for that name, btw), I'm more interested in Open webOS and the future though.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  9. #9  
    very interesting read indeed. I tried to try OnLive on my desktop a year or so ago, but despite having a fairly typical 3 megabit DSL that they said would be sufficient, the OnLive client refused to run saying my internet was too slow. I even tried to upgrade my connection speed, but due to my distance from the CO, 3 megabit was the fastest I could get. So I gave up. I now have a 20 megabit connection from the cable tv company, so OnLive would probably work now, but I've lost interest.

    as the article alludes, my experience was probably their biggest problem in attracting users. a large portion of the masses that would want to use OnLive have a 1.5 or 3 megabit internet connection, and that's just not going to work, or worse it will work sometimes but not others.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by johnsonx42 View Post
    very interesting read indeed. I tried to try OnLive on my desktop a year or so ago, but despite having a fairly typical 3 megabit DSL that they said would be sufficient, the OnLive client refused to run saying my internet was too slow. I even tried to upgrade my connection speed, but due to my distance from the CO, 3 megabit was the fastest I could get. So I gave up. I now have a 20 megabit connection from the cable tv company, so OnLive would probably work now, but I've lost interest.

    as the article alludes, my experience was probably their biggest problem in attracting users. a large portion of the masses that would want to use OnLive have a 1.5 or 3 megabit internet connection, and that's just not going to work, or worse it will work sometimes but not others.
    or like myself, they thought it was ok or at least interesting, but i have a nasty monthly download limit which that service woudl cripple pretty fast, esp when combined with netflix/etc i already use, it just put me off for that exact reason.
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  11. #11  
    Hello Everyone,

    As an ex-HP employee with some insight into their long-term strategy planning (or lack thereof), I would say that it would be smart not to wait and expect them to do something in this space. Let me give a couple of examples...

    1 - In 1993 (yes, 1993) HP had a fantastic instant messaging product that had been developed by HP Labs. It worked extremely well, even letting users send executable applications to each other (with permissions and security, of course) that would open and execute on the recipients machine when they arrived. HP's management, very engineering-focused and with little skill in marketing strategy, decided that instant messaging would never be of any value and decided not to pursue the project. This was re-visited again in 1998, and management, still bereft of any marketing knowledge, again decided it was not a market worth pursuing. We all know that Yahoo, Skype, MSN and others made a different decision.

    2 - In 1997-1998 HP was working on something called "JetSend" - a content negotiation protocol. This protocol would allow two unrelated devices to negotiate with each other and determine the best content possible to share. It would work over infrared, bluetooth, the internet or any other connection. Effectively, you could walk up to a printer, point your tablet or smartphone at it, and the two devices would negotiate together to decide what the best way to share information would be. They even had a document scanner that would scan a document in the US and have it print out over the internet on a printer in Italy without any kind of PC or server in between... kind of like a virtual intercontinental copier. Unfortunately, even though Sony, Lexmark, Panasonic and several other companies signed on to support the protocol, HP didn't have the courage to force its inkjet printer divisions to support it. Consequently, it languished until it was recently re-introduced as their e-print protocol, 12 years later than it should have been.



    3 - In 1994-1995, HP introduced Omnishare, a tablet-based device that would allow professionals to work collaboratively on documents over the phone line while talking over that same phone line. The product was years ahead of its time, and won a Gold Industrial Design Excellence Award from Business Week. However, after spending millions of dollars on the development of the product, HP allocated a marketing budget rumored to be less than $100,000 for its introduction and first year. Because everyone knows that if a product is engineered well enough, people will come and buy it. You don't need to really do any marketing... only companies like Apple do that stuff.

    (Omnishare starts a little over 6 minutes in)

    4 - In late 1999, Carly Fiorina (the first in a series of disasters at CEO) shut down several "new technology" developments in Boise, Idaho and other satellite offices to concentrate technology development in the Bay Area. Forget the fact that HP's laser printers, inkjet printers and many other highly profitable technologies were conceived and developed outside the bay area. This effectively stifled several important development efforts on internet technologies just as high-speed internet connectivity was becoming widespread. When Mark Hurd joined HP, they finally had a CEO who understood marketing and strategy. However, when he couldn't keep his personal issues separate from the business, HP's board abandoned the idea of a strategist or marketer as CEO and went back to an engineer who couldn't strategize his way out of a paper bag.

    All that said... I hope Meg Whitman realizes that she needs to clean house at the highest levels and is given the freedom to get some strategists and marketing experts in important positions. There was a time when I believed that HP could truly challenge Apple's sickening dominance of effective product messaging in high-tech. However, I have seen few indications of that skill from HP since Mark Hurd left. In short, don't wait on HP, do everything you can to support the organizations you KNOW are working on the things you want, and perhaps HP will eventually get their act together.
    Last edited by PreProponent; 08/29/2012 at 05:55 PM.

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