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  1. #21  
    The article is backward looking. Such is important for diagnosing how things got to where they are, but it doesn't speak much to what is currently ongoing to address the issues. Additionally, I'd also caution all press is written from a particular viewpoint and tends to favor the sensational. That is, having clear and colorful characters/roles for everyone sells better. There has obviously been a lot of drama and dysfunction at HP, but the good guy/bad guy stuff is quite as clean cut as the author makes it out be.

    That said, Whitman, so far, appears to be making the correct and necessary moves. Most importantly, she seems to be doing the one thing Apotheker did not do at all, building a solid and functioning leadership team. Reorganizing the business units to start to take advantage of HP's one significant competitive advantage, its scale, is also a good idea, I think. Things are not moving as fast as many here would like, but the real world seldom moves as fast as our dreams and desires.

    Gargoyle
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by gargoylejps View Post
    The article is backward looking. Such is important for diagnosing how things got to where they are, but it doesn't speak much to what is currently ongoing to address the issues.
    Isn't that what you would expect from an article entitled "How Hewlett-Packard lost it's way"...?

    It is a pretty good article, and now the question is would you buy the stock which is currently trading at around half of it's price from just a year ago?
  3. #23  
    This has all the makings of a great mini-series. It really makes me wonder how Phil McKinney could even focus enough to write a book on Innovation after living through all that. Meg's got a tough job, but I think if anyone can do it, she can.
    It doesn't sound like anyone's going to be mentioning webOS at a board meeting for quite a while.
    You plug your phone in?
  4. gbp
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    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by woosh View Post
    This has all the makings of a great mini-series. It really makes me wonder how Phil McKinney could even focus enough to write a book on Innovation after living through all that. Meg's got a tough job, but I think if anyone can do it, she can.
    It doesn't sound like anyone's going to be mentioning webOS at a board meeting for quite a while.
    He might be living inside a shielded fiefdom. Quite possible that he might have no insight into all the board politics.
  5. #25  
    Here's a contrarian view on HP. Worth taking a look at since contrarian is how you make money...

    ...For many, the thinking is, since the market is presumed to be always right, why bother? But this is where investors often make the mistake of confusing "market sentiment" with "value" -- two entirely separate terms. One such stock is Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) -- a stock that I think is currently undervalued by 60%.

    As you shift in your seat by this suggestion, consider this: Although HP's stock has languished for the better part of the past three quarters, the company is now taking a new strategic direction that not only makes sense from the standpoint of its competitive leverage within the enterprise against rivals such as Cisco (CSCO) and Dell (DELL), but the company seeks to take a bite out of Apple (AAPL) after having first taken a page out of its unified platform advantage.

    From that standpoint, not only is HP poised for tremendous growth over the next four years, but it has also positioned itself to increase its profit margins in a relatively short period of time. That said, it will require a considerable amount of patience to realize this value, but the company has recently shown a focus that I have not seen for quite some time...

    HP: Undervalued And Preparing For Apple Assault | Stocks | Minyanville.com
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    #26  
    Very interesting article.

    I was around for an earlier stumble that's an indirect part of HP's history: the day that DEC (Digital Equipment Corp.) gave up on their industry-leading line of VAX computers. For years DEC led the mini-computer market, rising to the #2 position in the computer industry (behind IBM). I worked for an aerospace company that was a major DEC customer, and the DEC sales staff were there every week touting the superiority of their VAX computers running VMS over smaller competitors with Unix-based systems. Then one day DEC decided that it wouldn't be such a bad thing if they offered a Unix option for VAX computers. I remember the local DEC team put on a big show to introduce their Unix systems to major customers like our company. At the show I was struck by how lost and uncertain the DEC sales team was. A week earlier they had been contemptuous of Unix. Now here they were being ordered to tell us that Unix was also good. So what did DEC have to offer over their less expensive competition? The outcome was obvious: DEC cratered, and was bought by upstart PC maker Compaq a few years later. A few years later, Compaq became part of HP. I often wondered who made the critical decision at DEC to give up on their industry-leading proprietary approach and go with Unix. Would things have been different otherwise?
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