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  1.    #1  
    I saw this article on the washingtonpost stating that Congress may be forced to stop using Balckberry devices because of a lawsuit claiming that Research In Motion (RIM: also known as "Lawsuits In Motion") was ironically infringing on patents held by NTP Inc. A jury awarded $23 million in damages to NTP and is now seeking ongoing licensing fees from the infringing firms. NTP also is seeking an injunction that would essentially shut down the service in Congress. Of course this has Congress annoyed and has asked the lawyers to lay off the BB's. To which NTP's lawyers have wrily responded: "The U.S. Congress is defending the continued use of foreign technology that is determined to be operating unlawfully!".

    Anyway I say that we here should encourage congress and the government in general to adopt the HS Treos instead! It's a great replacement to the lowly BB and can do much more! So call your Representative and senator and plead them to drop those alein BB and get those good old apple pie Treos!!!

    here is the story:
    Washington Post article
  2. #2  
    Originally posted by gfunkmagic
    So call your Representative and senator and plead them to drop those alein BB and get those good old apple pie Treos!!![/URL]
    Why should we support Treo?
    Because it is American (hold the flag higher please) or because it is better... even if it was alien.
    Remember your roots America.
    90% of the population comes from aliens.
    Sad, sad, sad.
  3. #3  
    however blackberry also has a lawsuit against handspring over the treo copying its keyboard. wonder how that would be affected?
    Change is a challenge to the adventurous, an opportunity to the alert, a threat to the insecure.
  4. #4  
    The lawsuit has been settled. Treo and RIM are discussing a joint venture for HS to use RIM's mail system. Hope nobody's going to sue RIM over that.
  5. #5  
    I still believe that a marriage between BB and HS will be better than law suites and hard feelings...
    m00se
  6.    #6  
    Hey anyone see the segment on CNN's "Moneyline with Lou Dobb's"? They did a whole segment about the BB's and congress!! Here is a transcript from the broadcast plus link:

    DOBBS: Pete, thank you very much.

    Well, in other news tonight, Congressmen have many things on their minds, of course, but one particular issue lawmakers have taken the unusual step of intervening in a private lawsuit -- so they can keep their BlackBerry e-mail devices.

    Tim O'Brien reports.

    (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

    O'BRIEN (voice-over): They look like oversized beepers, but these devices are a lot more.

    You can send and receive e-mails on them, access e-mail on your home or office computer, and even get the latest news and sports scores.

    They're omnipresent on Wall Street and on Capitol Hill.

    When terror struck on 9/11, White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer was reading about it on his.

    Last month, when Al Gore decided he wouldn't run for president next time around, one of the first persons he told was his old running mate, Joe Lieberman.

    SEN. JOE LIEBERMAN (D), CONNECTICUT: As befits our relationship in the 21st Century, our communications were by e-mail or by -- I don't want to do a product promotion, but it was by BlackBerry.

    O'BRIEN: Research analyst Scott Cleland, who himself uses a BlackBerry, says users get addicted to them.

    SCOTT CLELAND, CEO, PRECURSOR GROUP: There are a lot of CEOs and their managements, there's a lot of politicians, obviously, that use them. And anybody who wants to stay in touch and in control absolutely love their BlackBerry.

    O'BRIEN: The House of Representatives has issued some 3,000 BlackBerrys to members and staff and has invested some $6 million in the technology. So it shouldn't come as any surprise that a patent infringement suit that could disrupt BlackBerry's operations is setting off alarm bells in the halls of Congress.

    The Blackberry is produced by the Canadian firm Research in Motion. But a Virginia company, NTP, Inc., is asking a federal court to shut down the company's operations until it pays royalties on the patent.

    In a letter to NTP lawyers, James Eagan, chief administrative officer of the House, says: "If the service were to cease it would significantly impact the ability of the House to conduct business and maintain communications between members and staff, both day to day and in the event of an emergency or terrorist attack."

    (END VIDEOTAPE)

    Now NTP, which has already won a $23 million jury award in the case, has responded, says it is more than willing to accommodate Congress and the royalty issue could still be settled out of court.

    But it is most unusual for the House to get involved in a pending patent infringement case. Lou, on Capitol Hill, this case is being watched closely and taken very seriously.

    DOBBS: Of course. To not take it seriously in Washington would be a totally anti-cultural there. Thank you very much, Tim. Tim O'Brien.
    CNN moneyline transcript
  7. #7  
    Wow! I never realized that RIM was a Canadian company. GO RIM! Before I sided with Handspring thinking it was just an American company fighting another American company, but now I find out it's Canada vs. America. Oh well good thing they were both winners.
    Alex.
    Goodbye my lovely Treo
    HELLO TG50
  8. #8  
    I love my treo but it still wont replace my blackberry for instant notification of email. although I saw a Good's new product for the treo that looks promising
  9. #9  
    I also believe before Congress would give up their blackberry's the would switch to Good devices before they go to Treo's, since there would not be much cost involved.

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