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  1.    #1  
    On T-Mobile and sending text messages to others?
    Trying to send a text message to someone on T-Mobile?

    Good luck.

    This article notes that of all American carriers, T-Mobile has the worst record with SMS sending and receiving by far.

    T-Mobile, the sixth-largest wireless operator, was one of the worst performers. Only 86 percent of messages sent from a T-Mobile phone to another network and 87 percent of messages sent to another T-Mobile phone were successfully received.
    Pretty frustrating, isn't it?

    Before reading this, I bragged to friends about how I could get 500 SMS for $2.99 a month. Now I'm not nearly as excited about this "deal."
  2. #2  
    I do a LOT of SMS on T-Mo. I've had no trouble at all either receiving or sending. Whether to another carrier in the states, Canada, or the UK - always instant.
  3.    #3  
    Er, Alli, how would you know?!

    Unless the sender or recipient was sitting right next to you, how do you KNOW that all of your SMS have been received and that you've gotten all the SMS sent to you?

    Personally, I've experienced several times in which -- testing out my Treo -- I've sent SMS to a fella sitting right next to me, and he didn't get it. Sometime he'd get the second SMS, though.

    Charming, eh?
  4. #4  
    I've actually sent SMS msgs to someone in the front/back seat of the car I'm riding in, someone across the table from me at a restaurant, or more often than not, somone I'm chatting with online. Generally, I get/send SMS as a query, ie "is now a good time to call" or "are you gonna be online anytime soon." Like I said - haven't missed one yet.
  5. #5  
    There are other things that I don't like about T-mobile, but SMS isn't one of them.
    I manage the computers at work, we are in a public setting (Library) so we have alot of strange things that people attempt with these PC's, usually virus's from web based email, and I have one of my servers notify me via SMS at each occurance of something present that shouldn't be...I also have not missed one yet. I am notified usually within 20 seconds.
    I also have T-moble alert me via SMS when an email arrives in a specified mailbox, so I can check it (still using one touch - it works, and I can use tmo's smtp server to send...)
  6. #6  
    I've never had a problem with SMS text messages, and I average sending about 300 messages per month.

    Treo 270 to Treo 270 takes about 3 seconds.
    Treo 270 to T-Mobile phones about 2 seconds.
    Treo 270 to other phones (verizon, att, cingular) about 30-40 seconds.

    But Treo 270 to anything "Sprint" takes anywhere from 5 minutes to never, but that's just my experience.

    And yes, just like everybody else 'discovering' SMS for the first time, I SMS the person standing next to me to see how long it takes for various carriers.

    Keep in mind that SMS, just like a pager, is a one-time shot - if the phone is off or out of range for the moment, or the person is online or on the phone - the SMS shoots off to nowhere.
  7. #7  
    ThatAdamGuy -- I respectfully disagree with you. Not only SMS works great for me (I have Treo 270), the fact that I can send messages to e-mail addresses, not only phone numbers, is great.
  8. lasonsky's Avatar
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    #8  
    my girlfriend used the yahoo mobile sms service to send a msg and it worked great on my 180 with t mobile service.
  9. #9  
    Originally posted by MarcoNYC
    Keep in mind that SMS, just like a pager, is a one-time shot - if the phone is off or out of range for the moment, or the person is online or on the phone - the SMS shoots off to nowhere.
    I always thought SMS is store-and-forward? The network would only transmit when it detects that the recipient is online, otherwise it would hold the message until its timeout period expires? Any clarifications on this? Thanks!
  10. #10  
    Now you tell me! I always thought that it was my problem...
    Current setup: myTouch 4G Slide (main), hp Pre2 and Veer 4G (backups)
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by elias_ejmr


    I always thought SMS is store-and-forward? The network would only transmit when it detects that the recipient is online, otherwise it would hold the message until its timeout period expires? Any clarifications on this? Thanks!
    I get my SMS when I turn my Treo on, and I get/send when I'm on the phone as well.
  12. #12  
    That information is old data, New Data shows T-mobile has a 97% success rate and is rated number one as far as speed and reliable, this was even mentioned on cnn news.
  13. #13  
    Originally posted by MarcoNYC

    Keep in mind that SMS, just like a pager, is a one-time shot - if the phone is off or out of range for the moment, or the person is online or on the phone - the SMS shoots off to nowhere.
    This is not true. If the receiving phone isn't available, SMS's get stored and wait for the receiving phone to come on line then get delivered. It is NOT like a pager.

    I turn my phone off every night (because I have no reception at home ) and I receive a whole bunch in the morning when I turn my phone on.

    I don't know how long it takes for messages to expire though.
  14. #14  
    i believe t-mobile will keep sending the sms for 72 hours before they expire
  15. #15  
    If any of you use VeriChat it rides on SMS when your not logged in. This way an incoming message gets to you. I use it all the time and SMS is a great tool. Most of the time I am IM'ing a vendor when on the phone with a customer via earpiece. Could not ask for a better setup.

    Arguably there is going to be some data lost for someone some where. Could be coverage and the message was not complete. Could be blind luck. Us damn consumers think wireless is supposed to work as good as our wired phone at home. We complain when we drop calls .... yet we always overlook one key factor:

    Full strength signal means you are RECEIVING a good signal, but your 300ma transmitter may not be able to get out anyhow.


    Older networks like Verizon, AT&T, and Nextel use 800-900 mhz frequencies which can penetrate rock and concrete better. Sprint, TMobile, Qwest, and other 'PCS' carriers use 1900 mhz which can be defeated by glass that has a simple UV coating.

    Derek

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