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  1.    #1  
    Hello everyone,

    A while back I was a proud owner of a VZW Pre 2 but in order to save a few bucks I joined a family plan with my lady and switched to T-Mobile where I tried my hand at Windows Phone 7. While a great OS my lady always heard me talk about how much I missed WebOS and so she bought me a 32 gig TouchPad for Christmas.

    So here I am with two wonderful operating systems each with their pros and their cons and I thought to myself a moment ago:

    When I launch an app in WebOS the card comes up and blinks a few times and then it fills me screen. In WP7 the app launches almost instantly. So what is the purpose of the blinking/flashing card? What's happening in the back ground? Are the processes needed to run the app running? It is something added to look nice? What is different about how WebOS launches an app vs WP7 (for example)?

    Please don't misunderstand. I love WebOS for all its' little parts and this is not to be taken as a complaint. It's more of a matter of curiosity.

    Oh, and for good measure, I kept the Pre 2 and all of the little things I got for it safely in a box in my closet. Ya know, in the event I have to go back to Big Red.

    -- Sent from my TouchPad using Communities
  2. #2  
    not all applications start with the blinking card.

    just now checking my phone... non of the PDK apps and games start in a card, but directly "into" the application and then there is some screen with the game title and the word "loading"...

    But also VisualBoy Advance starts directly... the same with woodenigma and a few others...
  3.    #3  
    Ok so theres always an exception to the rule I suppose.

    But lets say the app "Communities" which is one of main apps. It laucnhes into card view, then fills then it takes a minute to load. What's happening during the blinking card phase (don't I sound so technical)?

    Are some apps more complex that the device needs a bit more time to execute?
  4. #4  
    The app is loading into RAM. That takes time, especially with larger/more complicated apps.

    webOS is different from most other mobile OS's, in that when you "throw away" a card, it throws the process out of memory too. (at least i believe this is true). Android and iOS (not sure about WP7) keep the application in memory, even if you "close" it. The idea is that memory management is unseen by the user, so the phone keeps apps that you use in memory for quicker launch times.

    If you're looking for fast load times just leave the card open. You can still launch it as normal (through launcher, or wave), but it will switch to it instantly. Only issue i've seen here is it does drain the battery quicker, and sometimes the system can lag from too many open cards.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by NickVTPre View Post
    The app is loading into RAM. That takes time, especially with larger/more complicated apps.

    webOS is different from most other mobile OS's, in that when you "throw away" a card, it throws the process out of memory too. (at least i believe this is true). Android and iOS (not sure about WP7) keep the application in memory, even if you "close" it. The idea is that memory management is unseen by the user, so the phone keeps apps that you use in memory for quicker launch times.

    If you're looking for fast load times just leave the card open. You can still launch it as normal (through launcher, or wave), but it will switch to it instantly. Only issue i've seen here is it does drain the battery quicker, and sometimes the system can lag from too many open cards.
    If RAM works the same on a mobile device as it does on a PC then my guess is that it would take just as much power (battery) to keep the memory full as it does to keep it empty. In my Adnroid days I was reading an article from an Android developer where he talks about memory management and what a task killer really does. Essentially by killing the processes the OS then has to find something to fill it. Most RAM today is dynamic so it needs to be full so the OS is constistantly looking to fill it, so essentially by killing the processes manually you are also ruining the batteries life.

    Assuming the same holds true to WebOS then closing apps is actuall bad for your battery.

    I wonder if I would be able to test the theory. Keeping cards open (suspended) VS opening new every time and if it would improve battery life.

    I also saw an article here talking about how WebOS is developed using WebKits and it's inability to do certain tasks. My question as well is "why can't the OS be built upon another kit?" You can pretty much make it behave almost identically right? You can make it look the same too I would think as well? So if true, then why not change to a more dynamic kit to run the OS an its' apps?

    Not that this is an answer but imagine WebOS built upon the kit as Android or iOS. WOuldn't that make it easier for developers to port apps and funtions over? To open up new possibilities for the OS and how it behaves and the functions it could do.

    Am I completely rambling and so far off? If I am tell me now so I quit qhile I am sorta ahead

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