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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    Some valid points.Still nobody uses it.

    ERP software both ORACLE and SAP are browser based unless the user insists on the native windows client.
    Quality control software in Nuclear plants can never be let on a tablet.

    Dispatching software for postal has some merit. If you looked at Fedex or UPS guys they have a military spec gadget which is like a brick. Not a tablet.

    If I am a DBA , I would rather quit my job than runing SQL queries on a windows tablet.

    Yes, I agree, this could all change if microsoft manages to create a touch friendly interface.

    My main issue is the profit. How many you think HP can sell these ? And how much money they can make on these ?
    I'm experimenting DB administration, and my ERP administration over RDP with IPad. It's manageable. It's not problem because I'm running scripts I wrote long time ago, so I need to change only few lines per query.
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    #42  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    It's not a question about which is quicker, it's a question of which is more suitable for the environment. With that nice notebook from Dell/HP/Lenovo, you either have to put it on a rack shelf and stand in front of it, hold it in the palm of one hand while you manipulate it with the other, or sit on the floor with it in your lap. if you're doing that for 15 minutes, no problem, but often techs are in the datacenter for hours, the whole day, and overnight.
    The monitors and keyboards including mouse are available in datacenters , the laptops are not needed to carry around. Do you thing working on a 8.9 inch slate for the whole day is fun ?


    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post

    Also, techs in the datacenter are generally doing tasks like:

    Configuring the server appliances (eg. routers, load balancers, traffic controllers), sometimes with proprietary configuration utilities which are often only available for windows (and nowadays Macs too)

    Accessing documentation (both online and previously copied to their machine) related to the system they are configuring.

    Communicating with the office to give progress reports, chatting and skyping with other techs to discuss problems and solutions.

    Remoting into the servers (eg. with VNC or similar application) to install software, apply patches, configure the servers etc. This is also often handled by having a single monitor, keyboard and mouse in the rack which are attached to everything using a KVM module, but standing in front of the rack hunched over that for hours on end is no fun. Bringing in a laptop/netbook is better, using a tablet is perfect!
    okay, if you say so. I spent sometime in datacenter and I can tell you its much better to work on a "real computer" than a tablet.

    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    Watching a movie and otherwise goofing off while you're waiting for the OS to reinstall or restore from a ghost image.

    These are common things that techs do in datacenters all day (and night) long, and all are easily handled by even an anemic netbook, so the power of the device is not an important factor for this type of situation, but the form factor of the device is a critically important factor.
    Tell me you want a free tablet from your office for your personal use. I can totally understand that
  3. gbp
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    #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by chalx View Post
    I'm experimenting DB administration, and my ERP administration over RDP with IPad. It's manageable. It's not problem because I'm running scripts I wrote long time ago, so I need to change only few lines per query.
    Yup, changing few lines is okay. And just like you said iPad or Android will get you there with VPN or Citrix . Don't need a 8.9 inch slate for that.

    Copying a large section of a trace and sticking it in an email for other team members can be as easy as 1-2-3 on a normal PC compared to a tablet.Run couple of queries for comparing the results will be quick on laptop/PC than the tablet because of the screen real estate.

    Its not like you cannot do with tabltes, but which one is better ?
  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    They certainly didn't sell much when compared to the iPad and Android tablets. From what I've seen they might have sold anywhere from 50,000 to a couple hundred thousand units. That's not at all good, but it still is waay better than the TouchPad sales where - if TP had hit those numbers without a firesale we probably wouldn't all be stuck in the limbo we're in now...
    My understanding is that the TouchPad did reach above low end of those sales numbers without the fire sale. BestBuy supposedly sold 25,000 TouchPad alone. BTW, that is 25,000 at the full price! BestBuy did not offer the HP rebates for the TouchPad that other retailers did and got outsold big time by Staples and others.

    OuchPad: Best Buy Sitting on a Pile of HP Tablets - Arik Hesseldahl - News - AllThingsD

    BestBuy sold all of its remaining 270,000 stock in less than 24 hours after the fire sale began and even asked HP to send them more.

    Over 50,000 sales on the Slate is a stretch. There are at least 10-20 times more TouchPads in peoples hands than Slates. The TouchPad sold more units at or above manufacturing cost ($308) than the Slate did also. So the Slate sales were waaaaaaaaayyyyyyyy worse than the TouchPad.
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    #45  
    ahahahahahahahahahah good luck with that, hp(high-people)
  6. #46  
    Quote Originally Posted by k4ever View Post
    Over 50,000 sales on the Slate is a stretch. There are at least 10-20 times more TouchPads in peoples hands than Slates. The TouchPad sold more units at or above manufacturing cost ($308) than the Slate did also. So the Slate sales were waaaaaaaaayyyyyyyy worse than the TouchPad.
    Slate sold 9000 units the first month, so I don't think 50,000 over the year is a stretch at all for the minimum figure sold.

    Also, the article you sent hints that there was more going on with TP than just the number of units sold in the launch month - it suggests that the rate of sales had slowed, with potential customers adopting a wait and see approach.

    You have set me straight on the initial TP sales figures though - you're right that TP sales were much better than Slate on launch. It seems though that with the Slate HP had very low expectations and were willing to give it the time it needed to find it's niche, and were pleasantly surprised when it sold better than expected (although not really well). With the TP however they seem to have been betting on it being a runaway hit, and bailed on it when it slowed down? Or maybe it was just bad timing - Leo decided HP was getting out of hardware and wanted to get the ball rolling by dropping something right away, and the TP was in the wrong place at the wrong time?
  7. #47  
    Hey folks ..

    Ok.. this caught my eye so I googled and read up on the slate.

    For most of you/us here at this homebrew centric forum .. this device was not meant us.

    We/the webOS crowd know all too painfully well the old adage is still true. Software sells (or not) hardware. The slate is not a consumer device and is not burdened by the need to compete with the iTunes app collection..

    The slate is a business device so that poor blokes who want/ more mobility than a clam shell laptop but still need to access arcane business systems now have a nice mobile option.


    I originally logged in to see how I root Android onto my TP so now off to that topic.
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    Windows 8 is a complete rewrite yes, but like the other windows releases before it, it will be backward compatible with the vast majority of old applications - that's why some people are thinking it might be able to turn the whole tablet market on its ear. And yes, in certain industries there are still lots of business critical applications that organizations use that are only available on Windows.
    Only the x86 Windows 8 tablets will be backward compatible. The Windows 8 tablets based on the ARMs processor will not be backward compatible.

    The x86 Windows 8 tablets will work for businesses and the ARMs Windows 8 tablets will work for consumers.

    Both types of tablets will run the new Metro apps. I've read acticles that Microsoft is working on a Metro app for Office.
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    #49  
    I got my company to buy me the Slate 2 with keyboard and case. For my purposes, this should work fine. Plus, I am hearing that this will be upgradeable to Windows 8. That should make this product that more interesting.
  10. #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by Davey123 View Post
    I got my company to buy me the Slate 2 with keyboard and case. For my purposes, this should work fine. Plus, I am hearing that this will be upgradeable to Windows 8. That should make this product that more interesting.
    Please, post your opinions about it back, or just PM me with your impressions.
    People here do forget that HP has many services attached to MS's software, and that every sold slate can be few times more lucrative to HP in services.
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    #51  
    Quote Originally Posted by chalx View Post
    Please, post your opinions about it back, or just PM me with your impressions.
    People here do forget that HP has many services attached to MS's software, and that every sold slate can be few times more lucrative to HP in services.
    I get it next week. I will post my impressions once I get it.
  12. #52  
    Quote Originally Posted by inertia1 View Post
    If this is the case then why does HP price this at $700? The Slate hardly sold any units and they still don't seem to have lowered the price. My guess? The Slate is undoubtedly developed by one of the PC divisions which is accustomed to higher-end PC margins and is marketed as like a notebook computer. There is probably even the perception that pricing the Slate too low will cannibalize sales of HP notebooks. I don't think they think of them as being in the tablet marketplace.
    You answered your question. Slate obviously isn't created for same market as Touchpad, so it isn't Touchpad's competitor (or iPad's). Pricing? Aimed for corporate use, Slate will hardly find itself on firesale. One day HP may decide to give it free with blade servers or whatever. Not same market, not same rules. That is why I couldnt understand their decision to abandon Slate when Touchpad launch was announced.
  13. #53  
    facepalm


    maybe they could do a dual-boot!
    m505 > Z|71 > T|C > T|T3 > LifeDrive > iPod touch 4 >
    Pre 2 > Treo Pro > Aria > Treo 650 > Lumia 920 > BB Z10 > BB Q10
    Lumia 830 > 635 > iPhone 5s > Galaxy Alpha > Lumia 640 >
    iPhone 5c > Nexus 5 > Nexus 5X > Blackberry Priv
    My Palm OS Archive
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