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  1. #21  
    The Enterprise market is different. Enterprises want a machine that will do the job well, be stable, deliver a reasonable ROI, will have good warranty support, etc. Stuff like whether other machines are less clunky and better priced don't matter much.

    Case in point, consider a company where techs have to spend time on their feet in a datacenter managing a server deployment. It's clumsy to use even the thinnest, lightest notebook or netbook in a scenario like that - a tablet is what you really need. But the applications and utilities you need to access while you're working may simply not be available for the iPad or Android tablets. In cases like that, you need something like the Slate. For a company doing these kind of jobs all the time, $699 is a perfectly reasonable price to spend on a machine that addresses this problem
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartfah View Post
    The TouchPad out sold the original HP slate in the few weeks it was on sale before it was discontinued; but instead on canceling the Slate, they cancel the TouchPad.
    The difference is the Slate sold at its regular price, so they were making profit on it, while HP took a loss on every TP..
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  3. gbp
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    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    The Enterprise market is different. Enterprises want a machine that will do the job well, be stable, deliver a reasonable ROI, will have good warranty support, etc. Stuff like whether other machines are less clunky and better priced don't matter much.

    Case in point, consider a company where techs have to spend time on their feet in a datacenter managing a server deployment. It's clumsy to use even the thinnest, lightest notebook or netbook in a scenario like that - a tablet is what you really need. But the applications and utilities you need to access while you're working may simply not be available for the iPad or Android tablets. In cases like that, you need something like the Slate. For a company doing these kind of jobs all the time, $699 is a perfectly reasonable price to spend on a machine that addresses this problem
    Sorry , I could not stop laughing.
    In all humbleness I ask you a question. Do you really think the system admins can be quick in deploying a code base/ installing software in a data center with a 8.9 inch inch tablet running on a Atom processor with a slower 32 bit OS ? or a nice lattitude/pavillion / thinkpad from the likes of dell/hp and lenovo ?

    If anything this will be better at viewing Microsoft Office software documents. Which can be done using iPad/Android tablets.
    Last edited by gbp; 11/03/2011 at 10:08 PM.
  4. gbp
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    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    The difference is the Slate sold at its regular price, so they were making profit on it, while HP took a loss on every TP..
    True,
    But how many they sell ? or how many of them sold so far ? For the lack of actual sales information I am resorting to Amazon.

    See the number of reviews for HP slate.There are just 24, none of them are sort of enterprise users

    Amazon.com: HP Slate 500 8.9" Black: Computers & Accessories

    And here are the reviews for Touchpad ( agreed its firesale, but amazon is selling them for $ 200 plus ). There are 550 reviews.

    Amazon.com: HP TouchPad Wi-Fi 32 GB 9.7-Inch Tablet Computer: Computers & Accessories

    I am sorry, but HP is either brain dead or under the pressure from Microsoft. I think its the second.
  5. gbp
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    #25  
    And this is for ROAD Warriors, for what ? Checking email. Oh, Okay.
    A VPN and Microsoft Outlook combo does the same on any tablet.

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    #26  
    They're probably doing this because the original Slate was selling. Perfectly reasonable device for its intended purpose, the device may cost more but development of "apps" for it is unnecessary, which will save money.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    You mean Microsoft Word / Excel / Powerpoint / Visio / Project ?
    Or proprietary ERP solutions designed to run on Windows. It could be quality control software in nuclear plant, dispatching software in postal service... ANY damn software designed for damn Windows combined with user rights managament unmached in ultra mobile space pushed from domain. All of that combined with full Office support and full SQL, Informix, Sybase support. If day comes when MS manage to create touch friendly interface on top of full Windows, tablet space will be changed greatly.
  8. #28  
    Many of the above comments are right on target. This is why (sadly) we will most likely never see another webOS device. The backroom maneuvering in these types of situations is intense and in the coming year or two, it will become obvious what exactly composed the "30 pieces of silver" HP was given to push them over the edge to kill webOS development.

    (Really, could you so thoroughly trash a Billion dollar investment through sheer incompetence in so short a period of time? And if you realize your mistake, would you STILL be sitting on your hands, not able to extract any value?)

    The only kind of company that could make a go of this is one with 1) no relationship or desire to have one with ANY of the big players (Microsoft, Google, or Apple) and 2) the cash and discipline to hold to a long term plan.

    There are not many of those left. Oracle? But do you want to be in a relationship with those guys?
    "Sometimes I feel like an OS-less child..."
    (with apologies to Billie Holiday )
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  9. #29  
    A device like this will be useful for hospitals and doctors offices that have standardized on a windows based patient management system. About 4-5 years ago, my doctor and his staff were using Windows based tablet PCs to key in everything during patient interviews. I think those devices at the time cost over $2000, so $699 would be a nice price drop for faster hardware.
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by safeguard3 View Post
    What this really demonstrates is: 1) What it cost to manufacture a tablet - it's not $150; 2) What HP really considers a standard product margin - not break even and try to make it selling apps.

    The reason why HP gave up on the Touchpad so soon was probably that, even at $500, the margins were shaved in order to match the price of the iPad. HP quit the TP because they were so far from being profitable that it didn't make any sense to even try to give it a go for a year or whatever. After all, what other reason is there to give up so soon?
    What did they expect the margins to be? They spent $1.2 billion on the OS. Also, they bought an OS with only 3000 apps. They needed to spend money on building a developer base. They couldn't have expected to recoup that with one product, especially their first release product for the tablet market with a rewritten .0.0 OS. Profitability on this would have to span across at least 3 product lines. How could they tell everyone they were running a marathon then expected to get there using the same energy as a short sprint? There is no excuse you can make for them for this, period. They were/are idiots.

    Edit: Also, where is the profitability in producing yet another Windows device, competing against countless other companies, in a market that has rejected Windows products from the start. The margins on Windows products for everyone but Microsoft are notoriously slim and the Slate 2 is handicapped by a high price ($100 more than the iPad2, $200 more than a decent laptop) and an OS family with a terrible reputation in the mobile space.
    Last edited by k4ever; 11/03/2011 at 08:33 PM.
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  11. #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by chalx View Post
    Or proprietary ERP solutions designed to run on Windows. It could be quality control software in nuclear plant, dispatching software in postal service... ANY damn software designed for damn Windows combined with user rights managament unmached in ultra mobile space pushed from domain. All of that combined with full Office support and full SQL, Informix, Sybase support. If day comes when MS manage to create touch friendly interface on top of full Windows, tablet space will be changed greatly.
    Designed for which Windows? Windows 8 is a complete rewrite from previous versions of Windows. HP could convince these companies to write software for webOS and share profits with them. Half of the stuff you listed is already coded for Linux, which webOS is based on. They just need GUI tuning to run on webOS. It is ridiculous to let Microsoft get away with all the profits on this when HP could do the same. Why be Microsoft's slave when you could have your own freedom. HP is truly spineless.
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by hrminer92 View Post
    A device like this will be useful for hospitals and doctors offices that have standardized on a windows based patient management system. About 4-5 years ago, my doctor and his staff were using Windows based tablet PCs to key in everything during patient interviews. I think those devices at the time cost over $2000, so $699 would be a nice price drop for faster hardware.
    Or they could use this on a $325 TouchPad (at full cost) or an iPad2 for $100 cheaper than the Slate or an Android tablet for $300 cheaper than the Slate. This is overpriced with a failed OS.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    Sorry , I could not stop laughing.
    In all humbleness I ask you a question. Do you really think the system admins can be quick deploying a code base/ installing software on a data center with a 8.9 inch inch tablet running on a Atom processor with a slower 32 bit OS or a nice lattitude/pavillion / thinkpad from the likes of dell/hp and lenovo ?

    If anything this will be better at viewing Microsoft Office software documents. Which can be done using iPad/Android tablets.
    .and on HP's webOS tablet.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by marcedhk View Post
    The difference is the Slate sold at its regular price, so they were making profit on it, while HP took a loss on every TP..
    What did they sell, like 30 Slates? They lose money in storage cost for every Slate that is still sitting on shelves. They also lose money on the cleaning cost for dusting off the spider webs and mold.
  15. #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by safeguard3 View Post
    The purpose of the Slate clearly is to run legacy Windows software in a compact tablet form. Unless you can natively and these programs from day one, some enterprise customers won't even consider it - no matter what the fire-sale price is.
    Reading back through the previous comments this is the only one that makes sense to me. But seriously, where is the cost value in deploying these at such a high price when you can develop solutions for other tablets that will fit your needs? Legacy Windows translates to Windows XP. Netbooks are cheaper if you want to go that route.
  16. #36  
    Didn't mean to blast this thread with so many post. This just ****es me off to no end. If you read the comments under the story not too many people are seeing the value in this thing. HP has truly lost their marbles if this is what they come up with after screwing over webOS. They just need to sell webOS, crawl up in a corner, and die. They have absolutely no vision thinking this will do well. It has Windows 7 on it! Give me a darn break!
  17. gbp
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    #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by chalx View Post
    Or proprietary ERP solutions designed to run on Windows. It could be quality control software in nuclear plant, dispatching software in postal service... ANY damn software designed for damn Windows combined with user rights managament unmached in ultra mobile space pushed from domain. All of that combined with full Office support and full SQL, Informix, Sybase support. If day comes when MS manage to create touch friendly interface on top of full Windows, tablet space will be changed greatly.

    Some valid points.Still nobody uses it.

    ERP software both ORACLE and SAP are browser based unless the user insists on the native windows client.
    Quality control software in Nuclear plants can never be let on a tablet.

    Dispatching software for postal has some merit. If you looked at Fedex or UPS guys they have a military spec gadget which is like a brick. Not a tablet.

    If I am a DBA , I would rather quit my job than runing SQL queries on a windows tablet.

    Yes, I agree, this could all change if microsoft manages to create a touch friendly interface.

    My main issue is the profit. How many you think HP can sell these ? And how much money they can make on these ?
    Last edited by gbp; 11/03/2011 at 10:09 PM.
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  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    Sorry , I could not stop laughing.
    In all humbleness I ask you a question. Do you really think the system admins can be quick in deploying a code base/ installing software in a data center with a 8.9 inch inch tablet running on a Atom processor with a slower 32 bit OS ? or a nice lattitude/pavillion / thinkpad from the likes of dell/hp and lenovo ?
    It's not a question about which is quicker, it's a question of which is more suitable for the environment. With that nice notebook from Dell/HP/Lenovo, you either have to put it on a rack shelf and stand in front of it, hold it in the palm of one hand while you manipulate it with the other, or sit on the floor with it in your lap. if you're doing that for 15 minutes, no problem, but often techs are in the datacenter for hours, the whole day, and overnight.

    Also, techs in the datacenter are generally doing tasks like:

    Configuring the server appliances (eg. routers, load balancers, traffic controllers), sometimes with proprietary configuration utilities which are often only available for windows (and nowadays Macs too)

    Accessing documentation (both online and previously copied to their machine) related to the system they are configuring.

    Communicating with the office to give progress reports, chatting and skyping with other techs to discuss problems and solutions.

    Remoting into the servers (eg. with VNC or similar application) to install software, apply patches, configure the servers etc. This is also often handled by having a single monitor, keyboard and mouse in the rack which are attached to everything using a KVM module, but standing in front of the rack hunched over that for hours on end is no fun. Bringing in a laptop/netbook is better, using a tablet is perfect!

    Watching a movie and otherwise goofing off while you're waiting for the OS to reinstall or restore from a ghost image.

    These are common things that techs do in datacenters all day (and night) long, and all are easily handled by even an anemic netbook, so the power of the device is not an important factor for this type of situation, but the form factor of the device is a critically important factor.
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by gbp View Post
    True,
    But how many they sell ? or how many of them sold so far ? For the lack of actual sales information I am resorting to Amazon.

    See the number of reviews for HP slate.There are just 24, none of them are sort of enterprise users

    Amazon.com: HP Slate 500 8.9" Black: Computers & Accessories

    And here are the reviews for Touchpad ( agreed its firesale, but amazon is selling them for $ 200 plus ). There are 550 reviews.

    Amazon.com: HP TouchPad Wi-Fi 32 GB 9.7-Inch Tablet Computer: Computers & Accessories

    I am sorry, but HP is either brain dead or under the pressure from Microsoft. I think its the second.
    They certainly didn't sell much when compared to the iPad and Android tablets. From what I've seen they might have sold anywhere from 50,000 to a couple hundred thousand units. That's not at all good, but it still is waay better than the TouchPad sales where - if TP had hit those numbers without a firesale we probably wouldn't all be stuck in the limbo we're in now...
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by k4ever View Post
    Designed for which Windows? Windows 8 is a complete rewrite from previous versions of Windows. HP could convince these companies to write software for webOS and share profits with them. Half of the stuff you listed is already coded for Linux, which webOS is based on. They just need GUI tuning to run on webOS. It is ridiculous to let Microsoft get away with all the profits on this when HP could do the same. Why be Microsoft's slave when you could have your own freedom. HP is truly spineless.
    Windows 8 is a complete rewrite yes, but like the other windows releases before it, it will be backward compatible with the vast majority of old applications - that's why some people are thinking it might be able to turn the whole tablet market on its ear. And yes, in certain industries there are still lots of business critical applications that organizations use that are only available on Windows.
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