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  • 1 Post By thurman
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  1. thurman's Avatar
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       #1  
    I think I will hold out on buying apps also. I have purchased a few here and there. But honestly the future of webOS is extremely unstable. I realize that people on the forum are keeping there fingers crossed and hoping for that inch of longevity for webOS. But the true of the matter is if HP can see the writing on the wall, the love and the support of us then why should we continue to give it. Also seeing that the people really like webOS...then I will have to abort. I think we are kissing HP's **** and standing around waiting like little kids wanting a cookie. If the corporate HP World can't see the support why should we continue this.


    We venture out on a daily basis for every news clipping that we can find about webOS future. We go out searching for left over Touchpad stock in every online store that we can find. We look at our Touchpad's disregarding it's flaws. The lack of Netflix, the below standard built in browser, premature cracks around the speakers, occasional sound loss and the lack of proper customer service. But yet we continue.......

    The forums that are created daily are ONLY being read by us. They are not being read by the corporations that want our so called "FEEDBACK". They are being ignored. We are the consumer, we are the ones that allow them to even have a BUSINESS in the FIRST PLACE.

    If they don't want us and our money. Then what is the point of all of this in the first place?


    Please provide your comments. It is time that we voice our opinions with our MONEY. Believe it or not the money in your pocket is very POWERFUL and they WANT IT. Whether they deserve it or not.
    HP Touchpad 32GB , Treo 650, Treo 600
    webOS 3.0.4
    1969bob likes this.
  2. #2  
    Denying sales to developers who make stuff I find useful sounds like precisely the opposite thing to do.
  3. #3  
    If I find an app that I like I purchase it. Why? Two reasons, one, it improves my TouchPad user experience and two and most importantly, I believe in supporting the developers that take the time to develop apps for webOS devices. Not purchasing apps is like cutting your nose off to spite your face IMO.
    mivoligo, bluenote and Vij like this.
  4. #4  
    The touchpad will be very useful even w/ webos for most folks for 1-2 years even w/o full HP support. The communitiy will have fixes and tweaks to improve things and you will see apps that are really needed... if you want this for gaming and trolling a web store and downloading tons of games to delete then this is the wrong device. Having a touchpad that will link up emails, facebook, contacts, web, music etc etc.. it will be great and for some time. As for defective hardware.. it happens with all brands, if you have bad luck or cause damage assess your choices and do what best fits you.

    One could also hold out for the win8 tablet OS to drop on as well.. (could be part of HP's plan to get web0s servers offline) this should be SUPER easy with the hardware in this device and have a full featured fast win8 device. So my guess is by the time things get really bad with webos (if it goes down that road) then you will have a clear upgrade path for the device. There is already choices w/ andriod that will only get better if there is demand for it. 1 million devices, that is a LOT of money for someone if they get the bugs worked out and have a release candidate worthy of some $$.

    Just my 2c
    mkrausse and DeadVim like this.
  5. bioforce2's Avatar
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    #5  
    Just because HP is abandoning us doesn't mean we shouldn't buy apps. We should support the people like Kalemsoft and other devs who are still activley supporting there apps.

    As these forums only being for us... Who else should they be for? The community has done amazing things to make the T
    P far more useful. And its the community that is giving you web OS alternatives if you want them.

    It sounds to me like your just bitter about not having HP support in the future, but unless you bought pre-firesale you knew that going in.
    1969bob likes this.
  6. #6  
    Worth or not buy software base WebOS depends on yourself. If you love this platform more then anything else, then buy WebOS software surely worth in every penny you spent.

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
    1969bob likes this.
  7. #7  
    Buy a device for what it can do for you today, and not what you hope it can do for you 1 or 2 years from today - by then, everything in the field will have changed, and a whole new set of decisions will be there for you to make, when choosing your next device.

    The same can be said for apps - these mobile apps (for all platforms) are cheap.. most are under $10. If you find an app that you really like and want today, why not buy it, then? If it lasts you only a year, that's still comparitively cheap: $10/365 days = >$.03/day..

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

    paul-c, stephenson and mivoligo like this.
  8. #8  
    Since when was Pre|Central an official HP feedback site?

    Starving out the developers to get back at HP doesn't seem like a good solution to me, especially considering all the threads I've read about how Apple doesn't make any money with their App Store. HP would be making even less.
    Last edited by sledge007; 11/01/2011 at 06:42 AM.
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2 about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  9. jp99's Avatar
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Buy a device for what it can do for you today, and not what you hope it can do for you 1 or 2 years from today - by then, everything in the field will have changed, and a whole new set of decisions will be there for you to make, when choosing your next device.
    When considering this, I have a different philosophy. I want to buy into an ecosystem that will be here not just now, but in two, three or more years. It's more than just protecting your purchase of apps - it's also about your data. Some data can be based in the cloud, but more sensitive data needs better control about where it resides.

    The effort to move from one ecosystem to another isn't trivial, and should be done because you have to, and avoided by looking ahead 1-2 years if possible. This is a major part of my moving from webOS to iOS over the next month.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by jp99 View Post
    When considering this, I have a different philosophy. I want to buy into an ecosystem that will be here not just now, but in two, three or more years. It's more than just protecting your purchase of apps - it's also about your data. Some data can be based in the cloud, but more sensitive data needs better control about where it resides.

    The effort to move from one ecosystem to another isn't trivial, and should be done because you have to, and avoided by looking ahead 1-2 years if possible. This is a major part of my moving from webOS to iOS over the next month.
    Hmmn, my key sensitive data is docs and spreadsheets which are platform agnostic. Or wav files, also platform agnostic.

    Other key data is contacts which is more problematic. I've just learned of a way to export my contacts from the Palm Profile off my Pre. I suppose apps that will backup directly to the Mac address book or ACT would be useful here, I haven't rushed to look into CompanionLink because of the price but I am curious as to why they made the effort to create such expensive software on a firesale TouchPad.

    What else were you referring to?
  11. jp99's Avatar
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    #11  
    The effort to move password vaults around is the most difficult one I've found. I agree, generic documents like Word, Excel, etc., are easy to do, but special programs such as vaults create another issue.

    I've used JVault on webOS and like it, but they don't have an iOS program, so I have to reset up this all over again. It's quite a pain. I'm hoping some csv exports and imports will work to get me into a new program without too much effort.

    I also use bible reading programs, and materials in those can be OS specific and create another headache (user created notes associated with certain locations or chapters, etc).

    The platform agnostic approach you mention is the best, though I prefer security for situations like vaults. I had started using the webOS PIM functions but quickly realized how poorly they linked to other programs (if at all). I use Outlook on my PC now and Chapura's Pocket Mirror for the webOS Pre. With iOS now it syncs through iTunes with no effort and no program cost, and that transition worked well for our first iPhone.
  12. 1969bob's Avatar
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by stumblinh View Post
    The touchpad will be very useful even w/ webos for most folks for 1-2 years even w/o full HP support. The communitiy will have fixes and tweaks to improve things and you will see apps that are really needed... if you want this for gaming and trolling a web store and downloading tons of games to delete then this is the wrong device. Having a touchpad that will link up emails, facebook, contacts, web, music etc etc.. it will be great and for some time. As for defective hardware.. it happens with all brands, if you have bad luck or cause damage assess your choices and do what best fits you.

    One could also hold out for the win8 tablet OS to drop on as well.. (could be part of HP's plan to get web0s servers offline) this should be SUPER easy with the hardware in this device and have a full featured fast win8 device. So my guess is by the time things get really bad with webos (if it goes down that road) then you will have a clear upgrade path for the device. There is already choices w/ andriod that will only get better if there is demand for it. 1 million devices, that is a LOT of money for someone if they get the bugs worked out and have a release candidate worthy of some $$.

    Just my 2c
    Right ON !!
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by jp99 View Post
    When considering this, I have a different philosophy. I want to buy into an ecosystem that will be here not just now, but in two, three or more years. It's more than just protecting your purchase of apps - it's also about your data. Some data can be based in the cloud, but more sensitive data needs better control about where it resides.

    The effort to move from one ecosystem to another isn't trivial, and should be done because you have to, and avoided by looking ahead 1-2 years if possible. This is a major part of my moving from webOS to iOS over the next month.
    Um.. forgive me, but buying into ANY "ecosystem" for purposes of lasting beyond 1 year is, well, putting your faith into the hands of a company that can change its mind in a flash to suit thier business goals first, and your best interests last.

    Data should always be backed up, regardless of the ecosystem. Word, excel and image files are all multiplatform and can be backed up to your computer or a cloud based system, regardless of the ecosystem you use.

    Sensitive data like passwords or encrypted files should always be handled with care, and completely independant of any specific ecosystem one uses; Im not sure that is relevant.

    Sure, it would be great if WebOS could be assured to last for the next 10 - 20 years, but, that assurance isn't forthcoming; the same can be said for Android and iOS, as well, as each company can decide, out of nowhere, to change thier business plan for something better and more profitable/economical/less resource intensive. Just ask the Meego employees at Nokia.

    I again suggest, and recommend, highly, that you consider what works best for you now, and for the forseeable next year, and make your decisions accordingly... in the long run, I believe you'll be a much happier camper with less time wasted about worrying what to do next.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  14. cgk
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    #14  
    Um.. forgive me, but buying into ANY "ecosystem" for purposes of lasting beyond 1 year is, well, putting your faith into the hands of a company that can change its mind in a flash to suit thier business goals first, and your best interests last.

    Data should always be backed up, regardless of the ecosystem. Word, excel and image files are all multiplatform and can be backed up to your computer or a cloud based system, regardless of the ecosystem you use.
    That's why I like google's implementation (although it has it's faults) best of anything out there at the moment - pretty much all of my data can be bundled up and downloaded with two clicks, photos and documents are synched copies of what is on my hard-drive etc etc. That functionality is going to be extended when the 'gdrive' (or whatever they call it) arrives in the next couple of months.

    Moreover, does HP really even have a ecosystem at the moment? Beyond apps, what do they do beyond act as a funnel for other's people's services? Nothing as far as I can tell.
  15. #15  
    How much do you spend on apps????

    Most apps are < the cost of a cheesburger; many are less than the cost of the value menu items. The point I am making is that you aren't really risking much - if you think the app will help you - buy it.

    This isn't MS Office or Adobe Photoshop - you aren't going to waste hundreds of dollars in dead end products in all likleyhood. Be rational and buy what seems worthwhile and understand that investment may be shorter lived than you would like - but that it is so cheap already that it should be looked on as throwaway.
  16. jp99's Avatar
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    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Um.. forgive me, but buying into ANY "ecosystem" for purposes of lasting beyond 1 year is, well, putting your faith into the hands of a company that can change its mind in a flash to suit thier business goals first, and your best interests last.
    The one year longevity risk of webOS vs iOS vs Android vs Win 7.5/8 is hardly the same. No risk is zero as you point out. But to lump that risk in one category and label them all the same isn't realistic.

    Suppose someone is going to enter the smartphone market. If I'm advising them, there's not a chance I'd recommend webOS to them. That's the type of risk assessment I'm referring to in a decision. Android's viability is far higher than webOS, as is iOS, as is the probability those two will be around in 2-3 years. The chances of webOS being around by this time next year are close to nil (officially, not in a hobbyist sense).

    I don't see anything about looking for 10-20 year OS longevity in my post. That would be impossible to predict. But any person should be able to evaluate the 2-3 year timeframe fairly. HP gave us enough conflicting signals to give us cause for concern. I don't follow Apple or Google as closely, but I haven't heard of anyone seeing a similar risk for their OS's.

    Regarding vaults for secure data, I had used Excel in the past but I don't regard its encryption as secure as vaults designed with higher security in mind. Additionally the Pre had a poor implementation of viewing Excel files. However, I do look for some common transfer mechanism based upon CSV or similar structure to make the move easier. MS Outlook provides the same for my PIM category. Specialized applications such as vaults require a bit more forethought.

    Don't worry, I haven't wasted any time. I'm set for a while.
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by jp99 View Post
    The one year longevity risk of webOS vs iOS vs Android vs Win 7.5/8 is hardly the same. No risk is zero as you point out. But to lump that risk in one category and label them all the same isn't realistic.

    Suppose someone is going to enter the smartphone market. If I'm advising them, there's not a chance I'd recommend webOS to them. That's the type of risk assessment I'm referring to in a decision. Android's viability is far higher than webOS, as is iOS, as is the probability those two will be around in 2-3 years. The chances of webOS being around by this time next year are close to nil (officially, not in a hobbyist sense).

    I don't see anything about looking for 10-20 year OS longevity in my post. That would be impossible to predict. But any person should be able to evaluate the 2-3 year timeframe fairly. HP gave us enough conflicting signals to give us cause for concern. I don't follow Apple or Google as closely, but I haven't heard of anyone seeing a similar risk for their OS's.

    Regarding vaults for secure data, I had used Excel in the past but I don't regard its encryption as secure as vaults designed with higher security in mind. Additionally the Pre had a poor implementation of viewing Excel files. However, I do look for some common transfer mechanism based upon CSV or similar structure to make the move easier. MS Outlook provides the same for my PIM category. Specialized applications such as vaults require a bit more forethought.

    Don't worry, I haven't wasted any time. I'm set for a while.
    While everything you wrote above pretty much is correct, my advice is still the same.

    1 year, and that's it.. especially in the fast changing mobile market we are now inside of.

    The most important aspect is to pick and choose the OS and device that fits your needs and personal style/way of use, NOW; after a year from now, that will likely have to be reassessed, greatly, as the whole sector will have chnaged from hardware advances to OS shifts and changes to new companies entering the market and old companies leaving it. You can't prediict the details of this, only, for sure, that it will happen, and then plan accordingly.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  18. jp99's Avatar
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    #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    While everything you wrote above pretty much is correct, my advice is still the same.

    1 year, and that's it.. especially in the fast changing mobile market we are now inside of.

    The most important aspect is to pick and choose the OS and device that fits your needs and personal style/way of use, NOW; after a year from now, that will likely have to be reassessed, greatly, as the whole sector will have chnaged from hardware advances to OS shifts and changes to new companies entering the market and old companies leaving it. You can't prediict the details of this, only, for sure, that it will happen, and then plan accordingly.


    I understand your view. The two things that modify the one year time frame, at least for me, are two year carrier contracts we both face in the US, and that my spouse doesn't like to learn new technology (and doesn't do so as easily as I). Anything I can do for stability only helps those situations. I don't load her phone with many apps as it confuses her (she's not into tech by any definition) unless it has a real upside for ease of use.

    BTW, I really don't wish I needed to leave webOS. I like this OS and it fits how I like to interact with a mobile device. But I'm not going to move to the hobbyist route to keep my phones working (4 Pre minuses in my family) with support gradually ending for hardware and next year (I believe) software. I did that once in my life - stayed with CP/M at home until Win 95 came out, nearly 12 years - and while it was fun, I need my mobile device to function without that much overhead.
  19. #19  
    I bought a TP right after the firesale, and have yet to regret it. Knowing there was likely to be little or no official development, I am still happy with it for what it does. I tend to store, or backup, my important stuff on my home hard drives, so migrating it to another device is simple, as has been pointed out, most data is platform agnostic.

    Considering about two weeks after I got my TP my apply died, this has become my main computing device. Considering limited finances, I have an app list I am slowly filling. I see the TP being relevant to me, and the majority of people who purchased one to use for the next few years, without heavy maintenance. I just like tinkering, so am always on these forums and looking for new things to try.

    Canonical is working towards porting Ubuntu and Unity to mobile hardware, with a projected date of within a few years. Considering that will be an 'official' OS, I expect it should be easily within peoples reach as an update

    -- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities
  20. #20  
    Absolutely I think webOS is really worth it simply for the fact that it raises the ante in mobile innovation.

    In our family we now have iOS, Android, and webOS devices. I have user experience with all these systems. Each has pros/cons.

    Unfortunately Android has been my default device on a daily basis but not because of choice. I started out with a pre+ and it's still used (more like a ipod touch type role) but had to give it up because keyboard was unusable and the sticking headphone jack killed the ability to use it as a phone which is my primary purpose.

    But my Droid after owning it for only 1 year is buggy and laggy. It takes forever for the home screen to load up after I hang up from a call sometimes...so I'm waitng forever before I can even make another call. Due to fragmentation I was told a memory issue has hampered doubletwist media player from accessing my music properly on my older gingerbread phone.

    I'm saying this as a true impartial user. All webOS needed was simply better hardware and yes a little more polish and some features (i'm not a huge apps person) and it would have done well. I still miss ease of use.

    I'm just concerned with less competition and domination of iOS and Android these two platforms are already showing some complacency. Yes Android is adding some fancy hardware but today I saw for instance the Galaxy II phone and while the screen was nice but it's approaching ridiculous for pocketable phone. I don't need super fast processors. I don't need the kitchen sink. I just need something that can do core functions well. And besides webOS is innovative and intuitive.

    webOS wasn't some scrappy OS that was written by some hobbyist. It has potential and it's viable. Granted I know there are some challenges with the business case so I'm not going to pretend to profess things are so blatantly obvious in what should be done but more choices leads to better innovation leads to better devices that people can use.

    Plus call me old school but I hate punching at a touch screen to type...I want a real keyboard to have tactile feel. It may not be for everyone but again...that choice thing...it just drives innovation and gives different folks what they need. We all don't need to be apple fanatics or droid drones...

    off my soap box.

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