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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    FYI.....see link.

    For what ever it's worth., I think selling webOS is far better than trying to license b/c if the OS belongs to another firm, it will be hard to get apps ported to it....but if another firm buys it they will more likely pump money into porting apps.

    Take care,

    Jay

    webOS revival: why HP must license its ailing OS immediately if it wants it to survive
    October 31, 2011 10:02 am
    by Joe Minihane Categories: Mobile Phones News Tags: HP, webos

    webOS revival: why HP must license its ailing OS immediately if it wants it to survive | Electricpig

    The changes at the top of HP have led to a wholesale reevaluation of what was initially set to be one of the biggest slash and burn approaches in tech history. New CEO Meg Whitmanís decision to stay in the PC business, with Windows 8 tablets brought to the fore, has been widely welcomed. But itís the news that webOS is not going to be killed off, as had been previously mooted, that will really turn heads.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    I think HP is in the unenviable position of having absolutely zero negotiating power when it comes to webOS and other companies. They'll never come close, and I mean not by a long shot, to recouping what they paid for it if they sell it outright, and they can't ask for more than pennies in licensing fees per phone. This is a, "I'll do you a favor and take it off your hands" deal that HP probably has no interest in.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    if it wants it to survive
    Doubtful.
  4. #4  
    It doesn't matter if HP is willing to licence and what cost.

    I don't see anybody interested in being the licencee.

    There's a point in owning the platform. You are in control. You distinguish yourself from te competition, yo can integrate with other products in your portfolio and lock customers into your ecosystem (think Ipos -> ITunes(media library) -> IPhone -> Apps -> IPad).

    But as a licencee you loose most of the advantages compared to sole ownership.
    You save on R&D and share marketing - but that doesn't help much when you pay licencing fees instead.

    And if you want to licence then Android makes much more sense. You get it without fee, can join the Open Handset Alliance and influence the platform and have a super-large app market right now.

    It can be debated if licencing was a viable option a couple years ago (when Android was *much* smaller and less established and before WP7 was available at all) - but I don't think so.
    It's not longer a credible option at this point.

    HP is not going to find a licencee.

    A buyer - well possible. Totally different ballgame.
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by jrstinkfish View Post
    I think HP is in the unenviable position of having absolutely zero negotiating power when it comes to webOS and other companies. They'll never come close, and I mean not by a long shot, to recouping what they paid for it if they sell it outright, and they can't ask for more than pennies in licensing fees per phone. This is a, "I'll do you a favor and take it off your hands" deal that HP probably has no interest in.
    Agreed on your points, but I think that HP should throw some of their scale behind it and help acquire parts or something in order to get a bit of a better deal, maybe allow combined branding to help themselves out. Not that I care if HP gets helped out in the deal, it just might be better for them.
  6. #6  
    HP is a company with the greatest goal by the board to make the most money it can. It is why they have been failing.

    Most revolutionary tech is based on doing something cool first and worry about the money later.
  7. cgk
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    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by tholap View Post
    It doesn't matter if HP is willing to licence and what cost.

    I don't see anybody interested in being the licencee.

    There's a point in owning the platform. You are in control. You distinguish yourself from te competition, yo can integrate with other products in your portfolio and lock customers into your ecosystem (think Ipos -> ITunes(media library) -> IPhone -> Apps -> IPad).

    But as a licencee you loose most of the advantages compared to sole ownership.
    You save on R&D and share marketing - but that doesn't help much when you pay licencing fees instead.

    And if you want to licence then Android makes much more sense. You get it without fee, can join the Open Handset Alliance and influence the platform and have a super-large app market right now.

    It can be debated if licencing was a viable option a couple years ago (when Android was *much* smaller and less established and before WP7 was available at all) - but I don't think so.
    It's not longer a credible option at this point.

    HP is not going to find a licencee.

    A buyer - well possible. Totally different ballgame.
    Who are we left with at this stage? HTC, Samsung and Sony have all said no. The amazon story seems to be hotair when weighted against the five million prerelease orders for their android fork. Dell seems to have retreated from this area - so who is a realistic prospect?

    Sent from my touchdroid using Tapatalk
  8. #8  
    Once the developers have left and will not return it doesn't matter who buys it, webOS will never be able to be successful.

    This is the one thing that webOS Hopefuls don't understand and refuse to believe.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    Once the developers have left and will not return it doesn't matter who buys it, webOS will never be able to be successful.

    This is the one thing that webOS Hopefuls don't understand and refuse to believe.
    I never thought I'd ever see myself thinking this way, even when HP said that the hardware game was over back in August, but I do now. As much as I love my TouchPad, I can't see myself staying with this platform any longer because the support for my Pre 2 in terms of upgrades, etc is now virtually nonexistent.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    Once the developers have left and will not return it doesn't matter who buys it, webOS will never be able to be successful.

    This is the one thing that webOS Hopefuls don't understand and refuse to believe.
    Sure.

    There are a billion development folks out there and lot's of extremely talented ones out of work.
    They can easily build up very quickly if need be.
    I'm sure that they built up their team initially as well...
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by LizardWiz View Post
    Sure.

    There are a billion development folks out there and lot's of extremely talented ones out of work.
    They can easily build up very quickly if need be.
    I'm sure that they built up their team initially as well...

    Really?!?
    Where are they now?
    Where were they when webOS was at it's most promising point?

    There are very few new apps or updates or even patches and just because some company takes over webOS won't change that.

    The only way for a real come back would necessitate any company that owns webOS to internally take on development for new apps and/or pay for talented developers to make ports of their work.

    Because the "extremely talented devs" you speak of want nothing to do with webOS. There is no money in it for them. Talented dev's can find millions of jobs out there for the more popular iOS and Android that pays more. I'm in the IT industry and there are plenty of CL ads every day for talented iOS and Android developers that are willing to spend $$$. I've yet to see an ad for any other mobile OS.

    webOS has become a joke due to horrible executive decisions and lack of proper execution. There are hardly any devs that would come back to webOS just because some company bought it.

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