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  1.    #1  
    I think one of the main reasons why the touchpad is not selling well, is because consumers/early adopters don't feel comfortable recommending the device to a friend.

    Now don't get me wrong, I really do enjoy this device, however there are some very obvious shortcomings that would not allow me to recommend the touchpad to a (non tech savvy) friend, especially over an ipad.

    Think about it, how did something like android take off and get to the mass market appeal it has today. It started with a handful of passionate early adopters, and slowly trickled down into the mass market. While some may argue it was mass marketing dollars that finally put android on the map, I disagree, as we can all see from HP's efforts that throwing money into marketing does not necessarily equal getting real traction.

    So why wont I recommend a touchpad to a friend?

    Its not the lack of apps, or the hardware. The touchpad is simply not robust enough for an average consumer (imo). More specifically:

    - WifI issues. If a consumer has even one issue with Wifi during the device setup (which I have had), that is completely unacceptable. It needs to just work, always.

    - App loading times. I think HP/Palm needs to drop the whole flashing card scheme, and instead immediately show the app in full screen, and force the devs to create loading screens for their apps. The flashing card stuff, gives the illusion of a sluggish performance.

    - Poor performance, and low standards. It seems HP/Palm has been lowering their standards as to what is considered acceptable performance. The calendar for example, still freezes up (post OTA) when you swipe too fast too many times. That imo is unacceptable. Overall, it is just too easy to get this device to freeze up.

    I think most of the people reviewing the touchpad really wanted to like it, but you just cant get past the performance issues.

    In summary, The current device with its current functionality IS good enough. BUT, it needs to be able to perform 100%, 100% of the time. Take the ipad for example, or kindle. It does have significant functionality limitations, however what It can do it does well, always.

    I really hope HP/Palm can rework the performance completely, to a point where it is 100% stable and solid.

    Than again, maybe this is just me. Question for you guys, would you recommend a Touchpad to a friend over an ipad2, if not why?

    Think about it, if you cant get existing owners of a device to sell it for you, how can you expect best buy employees to do it?
  2. #2  
    The TouchPad is, I think, worthy of recommendation. The question you have to ask yourself is:

    Does it work for you, punk? Well... does it?


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  3. #3  
    Frankly, right now... I couldn't even recommend one to my mother. She's been thinking about a new phone and buying tablet this year and earlier I had been pushing the Pre...

    ...but now, with HP's failure on numerous levels to deliver an attractive product in a timely manner, I'm just steering her to Apple. It will work out of the box and mother will be happy with it.
  4.    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by pogeypre View Post
    The TouchPad is, I think, worthy of recommendation. The question you have to ask yourself is:

    Does it work for you, punk? Well... does it?

    Trust Dirty Harry.
    Yes it does work for me. As a new WebOS developer and a longtime WebOs fanatic, it works perfectly for me and I enjoy using it (even with its shortcomings). But, this does not matter in the greater scheme of things. I think what matters is, would you recommend to your mother?
  5. gtalum's Avatar
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    #5  
    I really like my TouchPad. I can't really recommend it until we can edit documents on the device, though. Once we get that, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to an adult who wants it for web browsing and for work.

    webOS is inherently, IMHO, far superior to both iOS and Android. The Touchstone dock is a pretty neat accessory as well.

    It needs a lot more games apps, though, before I'd recommend it for a kid.
    Last edited by gtalum; 08/17/2011 at 09:56 AM.
    Dee McKillop likes this.
  6. #6  
    The hard sell is trying to convince someone to buy a tablet to begin with.

    Once that is done, the TouchPad is easy to recommend and sell.
    tasogare and prdamrican#AC like this.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by stri8ed View Post
    Yes it does work for me. As a new WebOS developer and a longtime WebOs fanatic, it works perfectly for me and I enjoy using it (even with its shortcomings). But, this does not matter in the greater scheme of things. I think what matters is, would you recommend to your mother?
    Yes. It really is pretty simple. Does it work for me? Yes. Will it work for others? Yes. Would I recommend it? Yes.

    If I couldn't honestly answer the first question or even the second, then I would never recommend it. Mainly because I will have yupped myself into being permenant tech support for the person to whom I recommended it.
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  8. #8  
    I would recommend it to some, but not all. Depending on why (or if) they want a tablet.
  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by pogeypre View Post
    Yes. It really is pretty simple. Does it work for me? Yes. Will it work for others? Yes. Would I recommend it? Yes.

    If I couldn't honestly answer the first question or even the second, then I would never recommend it. Mainly because I will have yupped myself into being permenant tech support for the person to whom I recommended it.
    Fair enough. Im curious to hear what the overall consensus is on this.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Beanis View Post
    The hard sell is trying to convince someone to buy a tablet to begin with.

    Once that is done, the TouchPad is easy to recommend and sell.
    This is true... but then if you're the one personally convincing them to get a tablet in the first place, they're probably more likely to listen to your recommendation on which one to purchase.

    People who already are thinking about buying are, realistically, thinking about buying an iPad. It's a more difficult proposition there because the TP doesn't really offer anything over the iPad in areas that matter to the mainstream customer.
  11. #11  
    I recommended it to friends and family and sold multiple on it, who all love it. And yes, they have used the alternatives. They chose the TouchPad with their own money.

    The key to getting people to get TouchPads is a) ween them off of the social and technological Apple kool-aid and b) actually show them the device being used. Very few people can resist the "cool" factor of the cards and the overall usefulness that the system creates.
    stri8ed likes this.
  12. Yhippa's Avatar
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    #12  
    I couldn't recommend this to anybody but the most hardcore webOS fans. I got burned when I recommended the Pre on Verizon and my friend wasn't happy with the speed and hardware issues.

    Even though I own a Touchpad when my friends ask me about which tablet to get I have to recommend the iPad 2. It will make most people happy.
  13.    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by IGNTNUNLMTD View Post
    I recommended it to friends and family and sold multiple on it, who all love it. And yes, they have used the alternatives. They chose the TouchPad with their own money.

    The key to getting people to get TouchPads is a) ween them off of the social and technological Apple kool-aid and b) actually show them the device being used. Very few people can resist the "cool" factor of the cards and the overall usefulness that the system creates.
    Cool. Great to hear.

    There definitely is alot to like about WebOs/TP. My only gripe is, it does not always work 100% (performance wise). I wish the touchpad would just run like a freakin beast, I would have no problem recommending it than.
  14. #14  
    Having been a WebOS proponent for 1.5 years now and getting used to the catalog offerings (or lack thereof) I have been exposed to iOS and Android the past 3 months.

    After getting used to the OS' and having a really good look at the application offerings for iOS and Android compared to WebOS, I can't recommend the touchpad to anyone.
    Yhippa likes this.
  15. #15  
    I have already recommended the TP to family, friends and colleagues with absolutely no fear of repercussions as I will always add that the TP suits MY needs but, check it out for yourself before you commit. There are a lot of things not quite right and that's (IMHO) just a matter of fact. It is, however, also far superior than some of the competition in some respects. I am completely unashamed o say that I really like my TP - that's the most honest opinion I can give.
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  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee McKillop View Post
    ...It is, however, also far superior than some of the competition in some respects.
    I do agree with this 100%. If it was between an android tablet (any one) vs a touchpad, I would recommend a touchpad all day.

    But vs an Ipad2, bear in mind I never even owned one, I would not recommend the touchpad, simply due to performance issues.
  17. Xadion's Avatar
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    #17  
    I have given reccomendations and still will.

    I love my touchpad and it works like it should in all my uses of it.

    And I am actually quite pleased with the amount of apps that are comeing in, slow but surely.

    The only thing is case cracking- other than that...its a great device. I feel HP should make a new aluminum case to replace the plastic one and swap it out for people- put in the 1.5ghz kernal or whatever and call it a free upgrade to a TP1.5

    Yes it will cost HP money, but it will gain alot more in good vibes etc.
  18. #18  
    If someone told me they were interested in it, I would endorse it. Otherwise I'm being careful to just show others what it does, but not go out and say, you should totally buy this thing.

    I sold some friends and family on the Pre, and while some of them made out well with it, several struggled with the hardware problems and general disappointment in the development of the OS and apps.

    I bought a touchpad, and I'm comfortable with what it is, and what it may or may not become in the future; but that's a decision i think everyone needs to make for themselves at this point.
  19. r-nice's Avatar
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    #19  
    Depends on what they would want to do with it.
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by Beanis View Post
    The hard sell is trying to convince someone to buy a tablet to begin with.

    Once that is done, the TouchPad is easy to recommend and sell.
    I'd agree with that. I really like my TouchPad and would recommend it to anyone looking to get a tablet. I also don't think loading a dummy screen while the app is loading would make that much difference. Then the whiners would complain that the apps are responsive right away.
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