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  1.    #1  
    Quote from Ross Rubin over at Engadget seen here Switched On: The bedeviled bezel -- Engadget

    Quote Originally Posted by rwhitby View Post
    We always prefer that people donate in response to tangible items they can use today, rather than for intangible promises about the future that may or may not be possible to achieve.
  2. #2  
    unintuitive for the new user. But that's like saying race cars should have automatic transmissions because a clutch is so unintuitive, even if it isn't as fast on race day.
    JED-WEB-OS, Vij and laingman like this.
  3. nhavar's Avatar
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    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jakeeeee View Post
    Quote from Ross Rubin over at Engadget seen here Switched On: The bedeviled bezel -- Engadget

    Technically he's correct. There's been quite a bit of discussion in the usability community about gestures having low usability because there aren't any cues or hints to inform the user of when to use what. This isn't just a webOS issue but also Windows, Android, iOS etc.,.

    Personally I'd like to see webOS with an adaptive display. Remove the dedicated gesture area in favor of a little bit more screen space. The gesture area becomes a adaptive soft gesture area. Day 1 the user sees the gesture area and it contains hints or icons that explain the gestures. As time goes by and the user uses the gesture more frequently the hints can fade or be removed via preference/settings. This would give the affordance that usability people are looking for and get new users started quickly while allowing advanced users to bypass the training wheels.
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  4. #4  
    the gesture area is not part of the display. That's the point. It provides global controls from outside of the app. Like a keyboard or buttons on the bezel.
  5. #5  
    What was unintuitive about it? You flick to the left, you go back. You flick to the right, you go forward. Pretty standard stuff in computer UIs. You flick up to go to card view or bring up the launcher. Both correspond with something going up. You can also just tap to bring up card view, which is the same thing that the Touchpad does. Even the "advanced" gestures are intuitive. Full drag to the left, move current card to the left and reveal card to the right, and vice-versa.
    JED-WEB-OS and threed61#WN like this.
  6. #6  
    Yeah, I don't buy it either. I agree with everything rsanchez1 says.

    Maybe the author meant it wasn't obvious.
  7. dave75's Avatar
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    #7  
    Didn't read the article but I showed somebody who has had a Pixi for over a year the back gesture this week. Simple and elegant design yes, intuitive maybe not.
  8. #8  
    when something is intuitive, that means it is understood without explanation. It describes something that "comes naturally". It is not synonymous with simple. The gesture area is not intuitive. A new user wouldn't even know the Pre had a gesture area unless they are told.

    when the Pre- first came out, i read a user review that said, "multitasking is awesome, but there is no back button, so you have to restart apps if you want to go back. How could Palm overlook this?"

    All of the OSs have aspects that aren't intuitive. One would not know task switching exists in iOS or android if they weren't shown how to do it. Same goes for permanently closing apps or deleting apps. Of course, these two never really get knocked for not being intuitive because so many people are now "familiar" with them.
    Jive Turkey likes this.
  9. #9  
    I think the gestures themselves are intuitive. The gesture area isn't very obvious though since everyone assumes bezels are a non-interactive border.
  10. #10  
    Gestures aren't intuitive, not yet. For an interface method in tech to be "intuitive" it has to be popular and/or well know. Gestures aren't well known yet and that's why there's an intro tutorial when you start up the device.

    That being said, once you learn the gestures they are a lot quicker to use than having to go through buttons/menus.
  11. spare's Avatar
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    #11  
    its as intuitive as pinch to zoom or tap and hold. You wouldnt know it exist until someone shows it to you or you accidentally trigger it.
  12. #12  
    Multitouch isn't the most intuitive thing either. I messed around with an iPad today and it was the most unintuitive POS ever because I've been using webOS for two years. If I'd been using iOS or OSX for the past two years, I'm sure I'd have though multitouch was super intuitive and gestures weren't.

    I don't really think intuitive means "you can guess it out of the box". To me, intuitive means if someone shows you it once or twice, it's easy to remember and you don't constantly have to refer to the instruction manual to figure out which button does what like I have to keep doing with these crappy *** controls in L.A. Noire.
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  13. #13  
    every pre i've had (8 replacements, but that's another issue) had me go through a gesture tutorial to get started so I don't understand those that say they didn't even now about the feature. Just saying
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  14. rkguy's Avatar
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    #14  
    I still don't know why Palm didn't cut in little arrows in the bezel where the light bar is. If you pushed a new scene, then the arrow would light up to the left telling you "HEY I can go back", if you can go forward like in internet explorer, then it shows a forward arrow" If you can do neither then it shows an up arrow. If you can do both, then it shows both arrows.

    The key is that it stays lit while you are using the app. If a user just taps on it, then an onscreen help menu shows up that shows the swipe left, right and up gesture.

    Get rid of tap to go to cards entirely except for advanced users.
    This simple addition (some smart LED lighting and a pop up gesture jpg) could have avoided the confusion pretty easily
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
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  15. rkguy's Avatar
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    #15  
    .rant
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
  16. #16  
    ....or actually take 3 minutes to read the quick start guide that comes with your device (I know a novel idea).
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  17. nhavar's Avatar
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    #17  
    Intuitive means innate, obvious, inborn. Users don't naturally pick up the phone and understand that bottom area is anything more than bezel. They don't see the cards/stacks and immediately know that throwing a card UP off the screen closes the app or that swiping up from the bottom of the screen brings up the card view or launcher. What if my first thought is "this is like a deck of cards, if I don't want that card I put it back in the deck by pulling it down into my hand". There's nothing readily apparent in the interface that would lead them to any specific conclusion. The exception is in some gestures common to most touchscreen phones (assuming the user has used another touchscreen phone). It's only after 1) experimentation/exploration or 2) training/education that users understand the metaphors. So AFTER THE FACT it seems intuitive, but out of the box it is NOT intuitive.

    Where webOS really wins over other OSes is in things like lower barrier to learning, quicker time to proficiency, and reduced cognitive load. Learning the gestures is quick and for the most part they are easily remembered. webOS is already better in terms of usability than any other OS I've used to date. However, that doesn't mean that they can't improve even further.
  18. #18  
    it's like saying a the straw is the least intuitive part of the cup

    so what

    that doesn't make it any less useful
    pavlindrom likes this.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rkguy View Post
    I still don't know why Palm didn't cut in little arrows in the bezel where the light bar is. If you pushed a new scene, then the arrow would light up to the left telling you "HEY I can go back", if you can go forward like in internet explorer, then it shows a forward arrow" If you can do neither then it shows an up arrow. If you can do both, then it shows both arrows.

    The key is that it stays lit while you are using the app. If a user just taps on it, then an onscreen help menu shows up that shows the swipe left, right and up gesture.

    Get rid of tap to go to cards entirely except for advanced users.
    This simple addition (some smart LED lighting and a pop up gesture jpg) could have avoided the confusion pretty easily
    That's a brilliant idea. Really, any sort of visual indicator in the gesture area would have gone a long way in training users.
  20. rkguy's Avatar
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    #20  
    ha. thanks. i realized I said internet explorer. Ops. Anyway, upon further thought, the thing that would be confusing about my idea is if you can go forward, back, and up (for example): Do you show all three arrows or just assume that the user would know at that point that up always goes to card mode? Hmmm. Would it be cluttered? Wonder if I should make a suggestion. BTW are they getting rid of the gesture on phones entirely or will it stay around?
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
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