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  1. #21  
    people still read engadget???

  2. #22  
    Umm...I've not showed my phone to anyone who didn't get it after I explained it once. Swipe back to go back. I agree someone picking up an already activated phone would have an issue, but new users get the tutorial, right?
    The value of knowledge is not in its possession, but in its use.
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    #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by Sukiyaki View Post
    Umm...I've not showed my phone to anyone who didn't get it after I explained it once. Swipe back to go back. I agree someone picking up an already activated phone would have an issue, but new users get the tutorial, right?
    But we're arguing about intuitiveness not usability as a whole. Is it highly usable after some moderate exploration and/or training ABSOLUTELY. Is it intuitive right out of the box - meaning does the gesture area have a clear indicator of how it's meant to be used - NO.

    It's okay to be critical and say "I think they could improve on [x]" and still be an advocate and love your device(s).

    Look I get it just as much as everyone else. I love my classic Pre and my Touchpad. But I have to put on my UCD professional hat and say there's room for improvement. It took FOREVER to get my wife over to the Pre, because every time she picked up my Pre she wasn't quite sure what to do and being the independent woman she is, she didn't want my instruction. Likewise all those people trying the Veer out at Best Buy aren't going to immediately "get" gestures (beyond those that already exist on other phones they've tried).

    I think there are small changes that HP could make to the design to keep gestures and make them more intuitive
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mhunterjr View Post
    when something is intuitive, that means it is understood without explanation. It describes something that "comes naturally". It is not synonymous with simple. The gesture area is not intuitive. A new user wouldn't even know the Pre had a gesture area unless they are told.

    when the Pre- first came out, i read a user review that said, "multitasking is awesome, but there is no back button, so you have to restart apps if you want to go back. How could Palm overlook this?"

    All of the OSs have aspects that aren't intuitive. One would not know task switching exists in iOS or android if they weren't shown how to do it. Same goes for permanently closing apps or deleting apps. Of course, these two never really get knocked for not being intuitive because so many people are now "familiar" with them.
    That's what "quick start" guides and user manuals are for and after a few seconds the user will become familiar with the gestures.
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    #25  
    People don't read the manual while shopping at the store. They look, they touch, they get a 10 to 60 second impression and they either like it (for the price) or the go to the next phone. If people were pushing the Veer at atnt rt now then they could show gestures but they device has to do it itself bc they really aren't going to the trouble. Also, many shoppers, myself included, like to shop without sales people talking to them. It matters at the store.

    -- Sent from my Palm Veer using Forums
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
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    #26  
    My wife is one of the least techno capable people out there (she really dislikes tech stuff), and if she can use the gestures it obliterates any person's opinion that gestures aren't intuitive. She got it quickly and has had no problem with them on her Pre-.

    I'll end up switching carriers because of this eventually - we're on Sprint, so I can see moving to one of the Big 2 once the Pre 3 is out. I might be able to get her on an iPhone, but no way she'll ever want to use Android.
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    #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by jp99 View Post
    My wife is one of the least techno capable people out there (she really dislikes tech stuff), and if she can use the gestures it obliterates any person's opinion that gestures aren't intuitive. She got it quickly and has had no problem with them on her Pre-.

    I'll end up switching carriers because of this eventually - we're on Sprint, so I can see moving to one of the Big 2 once the Pre 3 is out. I might be able to get her on an iPhone, but no way she'll ever want to use Android.
    Good! Did you have to show her or did she get it on her own right away?



    -- Sent from my Palm Veer using Forums
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by jp99 View Post
    My wife is one of the least techno capable people out there (she really dislikes tech stuff), and if she can use the gestures it obliterates any person's opinion that gestures aren't intuitive. She got it quickly and has had no problem with them on her Pre-.

    I'll end up switching carriers because of this eventually - we're on Sprint, so I can see moving to one of the Big 2 once the Pre 3 is out. I might be able to get her on an iPhone, but no way she'll ever want to use Android.
    My wife is the same way - often I describe her as a Luddite. She took to the Pre like a fish to water - the gestures tutorial was sufficient to have her going right away. She's never adopted the advanced gesture and isn't interested in learning it.

    She's used a few iPhones (friends phones) and hated them - but now that I have one from work and I've shown her how it works (NOT intuitively btw) she's fine with the idea of using an iPhone if we need to change in the future - since she hasn't used Android yet that's not on the table but if the interface is reasonably consistent I suspect she'd adapt.

    As for intuitive. You can argue about all the definitions you want. The strictest definition is silly. There is no electronic device - even a dumb phone - that is entirely intuitive. Stop grinding axes with wordsmithing - the iPhone's "Home" button is not intuitive nor is the back or the up gesture in webOS - but they are super easy to learn and get accustomed to. Or the two I am more proficient in webOS but with iOS 4.2 I am not finding major deficiencies in navigation etc. Cut and paste? It took a while to learn this in webOS and I haven't learned it in iOS (don't bother teaching I'm planning to learn soon). The point is NONE of this is immediately intuitive - as another person said - even the pinch and spread action to shrink and expand zoom isn't "intuitive" in a strict definition. On the other hand the motion used easily associates with the action making it very easy to remember and perform - which becomes quite intuitive once you have been shown how to do it.
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    #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rkguy View Post
    Good! Did you have to show her or did she get it on her own right away?
    I took her through the tutorial in the store when we got it, and then gave her another lesson at home on navigating the menus, and that was it. She took to it easily. Out of all the tech things I've had to teach her, webOS turned out to be the easiest.
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by fxspec06 View Post
    people still read engadget???

    You know you still read it... I see your comments on there all the time.
  11. #31  
    there is a difference between something being intuitive and something being simple/useful. The gesture area isnt intuitive, period. But its easy to learn and improves navigation on mobile devices. I dont think the article was bashing the gesture area, just highlighting the fact that interactive bezel are not yet familiar to consumers.
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