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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    I think rimms push patents and security patents are worth a pretty penny in the industry

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Is it worth 1,459,000,000,000 pennies? Palm's one was barely worth 120,000,000,000 pennies...
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by augustofretes View Post
    Is it worth 1,459,000,000,000 pennies? Palm's one was barely worth 120,000,000,000 pennies...
    Why not?.. Have you seen rim's patents.. To know their value..??

    Do you believe that those are the only patents they hold?

    What about their enterprise market that have paid & continue to pay very shiny pretty pennies for their security..

    Stop arguing just to try & prove a point.. I admit I don't know what they're worth .. But to say they are worthless?? Their patents are worthless.. That's a statement that needs some facts .

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  3. #23  
    I did not say they were worthless, I said RIM's price is way to high for a patent portafolio.

    No company is actually thinking about buying RIM *at* this price. If you think so (like Crackberry seems) you're delusional.
  4. #24  
    <<thread moved>>
  5. #25  
    HP buying RIM doesn't make much sense.
    RIM is failing - but still costs too much for what HP would get in exchange.

    Patents are overrated. Most of the stuff isn't worth the paper it's printed on if it were actually contested in court (there's good reasons companies usually make deals before it comes to a judgement).

    A big company needs enough patents as deterrence and to counter-sue.

    It works like this:
    * Big company sues small company - small company settles and pays or just folds because they can't pay the lawyers for year and go through several courts.
    * Big company vs big company - lots of threats and counter-threats - ends in settlement where all parties licence each other and weaker company pays some acceptable amount.

    HP probably has a large enough patent portfolio to have enough deterrence already. Palm brought them already a nice pack of patents for much less money than RIM would cost.

    I think it's likely that RIM gets bought - but I think it will be another company like Dell. Or one of the Asian manufacturers who want to climb the value chain.
    Pre -> Pre3 & TP32 -> Nexus 5
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by augustofretes View Post
    I did not say they were worthless, I said RIM's price is way to high for a patent portafolio.

    No company is actually thinking about buying RIM *at* this price. If you think so (like Crackberry seems) you're delusional.
    I didn't say that any company is thinking about buying rim.. Just that their patents may be worth their market cap.

    All you need to do is provide proof why you think their portfolio is worth less than their market cap.. Even a couple of analyst statements .. Something..

    Here's a good talking point article.. That ends up where we are right now..

    Have a read

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/stor...hares-buy.html

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  7. #27  
    Here's another good read..

    http://www.cbc.ca/fp/story/2011/06/24/5000697.html

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  8. #28  
    Palm's price was acceptable because the purchase gave HP a versatile, scaleable OS to put on pretty much everything.

    Buying RIM wouldn't give HP much... QNX isn't even RIM's, they've licensed it. Patents, ok... but those don't justify the price.
  9. #29  
    Pointless purchase. Palm was the right choice for getting webOS. RIM's way too expensive anyway. Even now, their market cap is $14B.
  10. #30  
    The only thing of value that I see from RIM is BES. If HP is serious about making a "corporate management tool" for WebOS products, this would be the only reason that I can think of to get RIM then converting it to work with WebOS versus building a new one from scratch in house.

    As much as I like BES, I think that it was also RIM's Achilles Heel. Sure you can manage your device like no other, but they simply charged too much for that ability. I've worked at several small and one large business that used blackberries. The small ones back in the day were able to get by with the free BES server and 5 licenses that RIM would give away at sponsored events, but if the businesses wanted to buy BES otherwise it would be about $3000 for the server plus maintenance and device licenses, and even then you were locked into just Blackberry devices.

    Today, they just aren't the only team with a ball to play with, and that is their problem. "IF" they were to open up BES to be able to support iOS, Android, WinMo, WebOS, etc... they might have a chance, but I think they missed that boat by at least 3 years. If they were ever going to do it, it should have been when the iPhone was released. I would really be surprised if RIM is still an independent company a year from now.
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