Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1.    #1  
    CRN article (excerpts below) seeks to explain Leo's comment at D9 about how he shielded webOS from bureaucracy in his own company.
    Seems to say he personally helped get the divisions enthused. This is a hard job to do in any corporation and this inside reporting is cool, it also encourages the ecosystem channel partners that HP is committed.

    "Apotheker was reportedly enamored of WebOS before he joined HP, and partners believe he had to do a fair bit of coaxing to get the rest of the company feeling the same way...
    "HP is a very large company and there are lots of moving parts around Web OS -- the brightest and the best across all business units. And because HP is so big, things take longer to develop and change," said Convery.

    Deron Kershaw, notebook analyst at Gap Intelligence, a San Diego-based research firm that follows HP, also believes that Apotheker's ambitious goal of turning WebOS into an ecosystem, and the complexity of the work this involves, has slowed WebOS' development.

    "By committing to put WebOS on laptops, desktops, tablets, phones, and printers, HP now has to worry about it being compatible with a wide variety of form factors, in addition to different configurations," Kershaw said. "The pressure to get it perfect and the demand to test on a variety of devices slows down development time..."

    http://www.crn.com/news/client-devic...bos.htm?pgno=2
  2. ijip's Avatar
    Posts
    885 Posts
    Global Posts
    960 Global Posts
    #2  
    eh, with enyo they will hit it out of the park i think~!
    Want to help design and write an app?
    follow me at Twiiter @ijip
    THANKS~!!
  3. #3  
    Now that they've integrated Palm in HP let's hope they start cranking up the innovation in WebOS hardware and software.
  4. #4  
    The switch to enyo was surely a tough pill to swallow, but I think it will pay off in the long run as webOS is introduced in more form factors. I know it seems like its been a long time since Palm was aquired, but it seems like webOS is now influencing every inch of the company. It wasn't too long ago when many of us were afraid HP purchased palm simply for the patents.
  5. ijip's Avatar
    Posts
    885 Posts
    Global Posts
    960 Global Posts
    #5  
    yeah, they are pulling a microsoft and pretty much handing their execs and sales force webos devices, and soon im sure pretty much everyone in HP will be offered one.... i just hope they can make their printers cheap enough between 50-100 bux that also carry webos. i think it will be pretty nice to "touch to print" hehe
    Want to help design and write an app?
    follow me at Twiiter @ijip
    THANKS~!!
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    CRN article (excerpts below) seeks to explain Leo's comment at D9 about how he shielded webOS from bureaucracy in his own company.
    Seems to say he personally helped get the divisions enthused. This is a hard job to do in any corporation and this inside reporting is cool, it also encourages the ecosystem channel partners that HP is committed.

    "Apotheker was reportedly enamored of WebOS before he joined HP, and partners believe he had to do a fair bit of coaxing to get the rest of the company feeling the same way...
    "HP is a very large company and there are lots of moving parts around Web OS -- the brightest and the best across all business units. And because HP is so big, things take longer to develop and change," said Convery.

    Deron Kershaw, notebook analyst at Gap Intelligence, a San Diego-based research firm that follows HP, also believes that Apotheker's ambitious goal of turning WebOS into an ecosystem, and the complexity of the work this involves, has slowed WebOS' development.

    "By committing to put WebOS on laptops, desktops, tablets, phones, and printers, HP now has to worry about it being compatible with a wide variety of form factors, in addition to different configurations," Kershaw said. "The pressure to get it perfect and the demand to test on a variety of devices slows down development time..."

    http://www.crn.com/news/client-devic...bos.htm?pgno=2
    Right direction, but hopefully not too late
    If this helped you hit thanks.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by bluenote View Post
    CRN article (excerpts below) seeks to explain Leo's comment at D9 about how he shielded webOS from bureaucracy in his own company.
    Seems to say he personally helped get the divisions enthused. This is a hard job to do in any corporation and this inside reporting is cool, it also encourages the ecosystem channel partners that HP is committed.

    "Apotheker was reportedly enamored of WebOS before he joined HP, and partners believe he had to do a fair bit of coaxing to get the rest of the company feeling the same way...
    "HP is a very large company and there are lots of moving parts around Web OS -- the brightest and the best across all business units. And because HP is so big, things take longer to develop and change," said Convery.

    Deron Kershaw, notebook analyst at Gap Intelligence, a San Diego-based research firm that follows HP, also believes that Apotheker's ambitious goal of turning WebOS into an ecosystem, and the complexity of the work this involves, has slowed WebOS' development.

    "By committing to put WebOS on laptops, desktops, tablets, phones, and printers, HP now has to worry about it being compatible with a wide variety of form factors, in addition to different configurations," Kershaw said. "The pressure to get it perfect and the demand to test on a variety of devices slows down development time..."

    http://www.crn.com/news/client-devic...bos.htm?pgno=2
    Still Veer could have been released on Sprint, t-mobile, ATT, Verizon and a global phone. That would not have been ideal
    If this helped you hit thanks.

Posting Permissions