Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1.    #1  
    I am planning to get an online back-up solution. Carbonite. It makes your computer back up available online thru the web in the pre. It has apps for iOS and BB.

    I wonder what back up solution you have that integrates well with the pre. I know there is Zumo drive and Dropboxify for webOS but they have limited storage. Carbonite offers unlimited storage for at least $54.95 a year.

    Do you think HP will come up with something like this? since they are all about "the cloud"?
    Last edited by johnj2803; 04/09/2011 at 12:19 PM.
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)
  2. jdod's Avatar
    Posts
    874 Posts
    Global Posts
    977 Global Posts
    #2  
    I hope the do come up with a Carbonite app, or perhaps Carbonite comes up with a webOS app. I use Carbonite, and Zumodrive, for 2 different reasons. Zumodrive is strictly for business reasons, it allows me to share files with business associates, so far I have remained under the level to be free. Carbonite is great to just "know" all my stuff is always backed up.
    Sprint since 01/06/99: Sanyo SCP-4500 -> Audiovox PPC-6700 -> Palm Treo 755p -> Palm Centro -> Palm Pre 1.4.5 -> Jailbroken iPhone 4s
  3. mosdl's Avatar
    Posts
    781 Posts
    Global Posts
    787 Global Posts
    #3  
    Looks like carbonite resellers get access to the api for it, so someone could build an app for it.
    Apps: MyQ for Netflix (Phone/TouchPad), Giantbomb (Phone), Excavate (Reddit/Digg clients for TouchPad)
  4. #4  
    I'd have to caution against online backup sites like Carbonite. Carbonite only backs up user-generated files like documents, photos, music, etc. It does not back up your operating system, your applications, or your registry, which contains the licensing information for your OS and your apps.

    How Does Online Backup Work? €“ Online Backup FAQs | Carbonite

    Considering the limited scope of what they are backing up, IMO the price is absolutely unjustified. For $55 you can purchase an external USB drive and back up your entire OS, apps, files and all, with the backup program built in to Windows.

    Spend a little more on a 3rd-party backup app like Symantec's excellent Backup Exec software and you can have a bare-metal backup. "Bare-metal" means you can restore your backup to dissimilar hardware. It's like having an image of your hard drive that can be restored to any PC, regardless of hardware. You can even mount and boot the image in VMware.

    I have all of my clients use Symantec Backup Exec with a NAS. Backups are completely transparent to them--they don't have to do anything as backups are scheduled to run every night--and it doesn't matter if their PC completely bites the dust and has to be replaced with a new or different model. I can have them back up and running exactly the way they were before in less than 20 minutes.

    If you need to share your files, that's one thing. But for backups... There are much better solutions than Carbonite, for less money.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  5.    #5  
    thanks.

    @syndil: is the symantec back up software a cloud kind of service? I am looking for an offsite kind of back up solution (ie cloud).

    I have a mac and i have built in time machine. I also have carbon copy cloner which is a freeware that mirrors your entire drive and is also bootable.

    I dont care about not having my system files backed up (or should i care?), I just need my "files" backed up securely.

    you mentioned there are cheaper alternatives? can you post some that have unlimited storage too? my files are around 170GB only but the grow very fast since i have photography as a hobby (i shoot RAW) and now i have videos too for my daughter.
    Last edited by johnj2803; 04/09/2011 at 10:58 PM.
  6. #6  
    No, the Symantec software is not cloud-based. For your situation, with 170GB of files and growing, I would not recommend a cloud-based solution. Unless you are on a connection with a really fast upload speed, it would take forever to upload that much data offsite. By "forever" I mean literally days of uninterrupted uploading, if not an entire week or more.

    I have a very fast cable connection myself, but most cable companies give you a fast download speed while capping your upload at something puny. My upload is about 1000kbps, or 125KBps, or 0.12 MBps. At that speed it would take me over 2 hours per Gigabyte to upload, or 396 hours (16 days!) of uninterrupted uploading to send 170 GB of data uncompressed. And compression can only help so much. It isn't going to shrink 16 days down to a few hours.

    I would reexamine why you feel you need for the backup to be off site. It is good to have a backup of the backup off site for disaster recovery situations, i.e. your office and everything in it burns down, but otherwise, without an Internet connection with a much faster-than-normal upload speed (read: expensive) it is only feasible for small amounts of data. If that level of disaster recovery is really a goal you want to plan for, without a business-class Internet connection, the best method would be to physically move the data. By that I mean transfer a copy of your local backup to an external hard drive and physically take it some place else.

    This is actually easier than it probably sounds, given the right hardware. It could be done with two USB drives, for example. Make a backup to the first drive, then take that drive to your office and leave it there. Then use the second drive to make backups for a week or so, then swap the two drives. And so on.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  7.    #7  
    @syndil thanks for the input. Yeah uploading the data is really going to be a problem. With a growing data disk it's a real test of patience.

    They say that initial back up is the only time that will really take a very long time, the succeeding back up will just take a matter of minutes or seconds (they could be exaggerating of course).

    And to answer your question yes offsite back up is important to me as well as access to it online
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by johnj2803 View Post
    They say that initial back up is the only time that will really take a very long time, the succeeding back up will just take a matter of minutes or seconds (they could be exaggerating of course).
    This tells me that they make incremental backups. Incremental backups only back up stuff that is new or has changed from the last backup.

    If the majority of your 170GB of data is photos, I think you would be better served by smugmug.com. It includes features specifically tuned for photos that Carbonite does not offer, and it's only $35 a year, with substantial discounts for 2 and 3 year subscriptions. And yes, they have iPhone and Android apps.

    The major limitation with SmugMug that might create a problem for you is that they only allow JPG, GIF or PNG images. No RAW. If you are OK with allowing your images to be converted and stored as PNGs, it would cut down on the amount of data needed to upload. I'm no photographer, but as I understand it, RAW is unprocessed image data, which is probably not what you would want to share anyway. PNG is processed and compressed, but unlike JPG, it is lossless compression.

    You can also add SmugVault to your SmugMug account to include the ability to upload files that are not photos, or RAW photos. Adding SmugVault to SmugMug costs $1 per month, plus $0.22 per GB that is not covered by SmugMug per month.

    But if you really want to maintain the RAW format online, then Carbonite or Livedrive might be your best bet. It's still going to take an epic amount of time to upload 170GB, but there's no getting around that for online storage.

    Were you a client of mine, I would still caution against it. My fear would be that you would begin the upload, and then several days or weeks later--with the upload still in progress and your Internet connection crippled from the maxed out upstream bandwidth--you might lose patience and wish you had chosen to convert to PNGs first, in which case SmugMug would have been the better option.

    Good luck with your decision.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    This tells me that they make incremental backups. Incremental backups only back up stuff that is new or has changed from the last backup.
    Yes that is what it does.

    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    If the majority of your 170GB of data is photos, I think you would be better served by smugmug.com. It includes features specifically tuned for photos that Carbonite does not offer, and it's only $35 a year, with substantial discounts for 2 and 3 year subscriptions. And yes, they have iPhone and Android apps.
    Yes most of them are Photos and some videos. I see that smugmug has video uploads as well, altho limited to 10 min lengths, they are in 1080p HD.

    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post

    The major limitation with SmugMug that might create a problem for you is that they only allow JPG, GIF or PNG images. No RAW. If you are OK with allowing your images to be converted and stored as PNGs, it would cut down on the amount of data needed to upload. I'm no photographer, but as I understand it, RAW is unprocessed image data, which is probably not what you would want to share anyway. PNG is processed and compressed, but unlike JPG, it is lossless compression.

    You can also add SmugVault to your SmugMug account to include the ability to upload files that are not photos, or RAW photos. Adding SmugVault to SmugMug costs $1 per month, plus $0.22 per GB that is not covered by SmugMug per month.
    I'd like to be able to back up with RAW files. Yes you are correct about RAW files. I share my photos in facebook and flickr (I have a free account). So It will just be a plus that i can share photos in Smugmug.

    I am not aware of the SMUGMUG Vault, thanks for bringing it to my attention. So if i get a smugmug subscription with video that will be $60/year, a bit more than carbonite with a premium of it being a "better storage for photos" because you can organize and share stuff better.

    BUT what kind of got my attention is this:

    With Carbonite (maybe same with other cloud back up solutions) once you delete your files in your computer, it will eventually be deleted in your "cloud service", but it syncs everything without you knowing it.

    With Smugmug (vault) or other photo solutions, once you delete your files in your computer, it will still be in the "cloud" until after you delete it. Altho you have to Manually update files.

    Deep inside me, i want both the pluses of each service, and do away with the cons (who doesn't right?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    Were you a client of mine, I would still caution against it. My fear would be that you would begin the upload, and then several days or weeks later--with the upload still in progress and your Internet connection crippled from the maxed out upstream bandwidth--you might lose patience and wish you had chosen to convert to PNGs first, in which case SmugMug would have been the better option.
    Is this the only reason that you would advice me against a Carbonite-like subscription? Aside from the fact that physical storage is a lot cheaper?


    I really appreciate all your suggestions. Thank you very much!
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)
  10. #10  
    Yes, the upload time is pretty much the only problem I have with an offsite storage solution for such a large amount of data. But admittedly, I'm used to looking at it from the perspective of needing backups to be recent (mission critical), which means they need to be backed up often. In your case, you would only have to do the initial transfer once. Since you would be doing RAWs, I assume the RAW file never changes, so it would only need to be backed up once instead of often.

    However that 170GB upload... That's still a huge issue IMO. I would not be surprised if it took an entire month of uploading to transfer that much data. I'd recommend using PNGs with Smugmug to take care of the sharing part of your solution, and then an external USB drive or NAS to take care of backing up the RAWs or whatever else needs to be backed up. Smugmug would of course be a subscription, but a USB drive or NAS is a one-time purchase. In my opinion, that would be the most efficient solution in terms of time and money required. That would probably be how I would attack it. Naturally, you may weigh the advantages versus disadvantages of each solution differently than I have.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  11.    #11  
    thanks so much!

    Yeah the upload is killing me. I am into my fifth day and I am still in the 18 gig range of uploaded data... so a long time to go. I bet my trial would expire and still not be able to have all my data in the cloud.

    I have a current clone of my hard drive, I have yet to use time machine tho. Will ponder on this some more.

    Thanks again
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)
  12. #12  
    No problem, I enjoy this sort of problem solving. Probably why I do it for a living! I'm curious to know what you ultimately decide upon.
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  13.    #13  
    Just to update this thread on what i eventually end up doing.

    I purchased the Carbonite subscription for a year.

    here are the reasons why:

    - i want to have my files as is, no converting of RAW files.
    - i already have a back up clone of my drive on an external HD. Altho i have to clone every now and then to make it current, at least I know it is there.
    - I want to be able to access my files on the go on any computer/phone/portable. what files I want to access maybe trivial to some but still this is something I want to be able to have.
    - Carbonite (and other services) keep my back up current a all times (when I am online). So not remembering is not a problem.
    - Carbonite offers unlimited storage. So when I change my hard drive or computer with a larger space, it will not be a problem.
    - I have time machine to keep my onsite back up current.

    There you have it. Some may even say that with local calamities and natural disasters cloud back up is a must, but that reason did not really affect my decision at all
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)
  14. #14  
    Thank you for the update. Even though you arrived at the solution you had originally been pondering, perhaps my questioning at least made you more confident of your decision in the end.

    By the way, is that upload still going?
    Touchscreens are a fad.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by johnj2803 View Post
    thanks so much!

    Yeah the upload is killing me. I am into my fifth day and I am still in the 18 gig range of uploaded data... so a long time to go. I bet my trial would expire and still not be able to have all my data in the cloud.

    I have a current clone of my hard drive, I have yet to use time machine tho. Will ponder on this some more.

    Thanks again
    I use a similar service (backblaze) and it took about a month to upload 600+GB of data.
  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Syndil View Post
    Thank you for the update. Even though you arrived at the solution you had originally been pondering, perhaps my questioning at least made you more confident of your decision in the end.

    By the way, is that upload still going?
    Yes, what you said is very true, it made me more confident in my decision. Big Thanks to you!

    The back up is still going I am on Day 11 and I am on 36.5GB. 140.84Gb to go I turn off my computer overnight once in a while tho so that could be a reason why it is slow-er than expected.
    My flickr Pictures taken by the Pre (pre plus and pre3)

Posting Permissions