Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. RafRol's Avatar
    Posts
    544 Posts
    Global Posts
    570 Global Posts
       #1  
    I didn't notice this article anywhere in the forums:

    WebOS: Will It Make Hewlett-Packard A Winner In High Mobility?

    Of interest towards the end of the article:

    "(Richard) Kerris described how as soon as he took the job, developers he has known since Apple days jammed his inbox, looking to get involved. “They are really looking for an alternative,” he said."
    Last edited by RafRol; 03/23/2011 at 02:19 AM.
    Visor/Sprint Springboard Expansion Module > Visor Platinum > Tungsten E > Centro (work) > Palm Pre
  2. #2  
    I like this comment the writer said:

    "I would have put my money on Microsoft to make number-three vendor in the high mobility space. Now, it seems clear that HP — with its webOS — is the more likely winner."
  3. #3  
    Later this year, HP will make webOS available to its installed base of PC users as a download. In the PC environment, webOS will run as an application, which will give webOS developers immediate access to millions of free seats. At least 100 million PCs in HP’s installed base are capable of running webOS clients, and 15 million more are added each quarter.
    Maybe if they keep repeating this nonsense over and over they'll actually start to believe it themselves.
  4. #4  
    The Forbes article is a good one. C|Net has something to say on the matter as well, with a slightly different viewpoint:
    Can HP make developers care about WebOS?.

    with this interesting quote:
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Kerris (HP)
    "The numbers game is not one we care to play. People don't use more than a couple dozen [apps] at most. So we want the ones we do have to be really functional."
    ...which misses the point about the number of apps supporting an OS which was so clearly defined in the Forbes article:
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Kay (Forbes)
    You might wonder why anyone needs 350,000 apps, why 100,000, or even 20,000, isn’t enough. After all, most people use 20-50 apps themselves. The answer lies in the “long tail.” If we all share, say, 19 out of 20 apps in common (e.g., email, contacts, maps, weather, phone, and so on), it’s that 20th app that distinguishes us. Most of us have some quirky need, and we choose the environment that satisfies it. Thus, the advantage goes to the platform with the deepest pool of apps.
  5. #5  
    like this comment in article:

    "Kerris described how as soon as he took the job, developers he has known since Apple days jammed his inbox, looking to get involved."
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    The Forbes article is a good one. C|Net has something to say on the matter as well, with a slightly different viewpoint:
    Can HP make developers care about WebOS?.

    with this interesting quote:
    ...which misses the point about the number of apps supporting an OS which was so clearly defined in the Forbes article:
    All I have to say.. Is look at mac os... How long did you have them with barely any apps.. MS threw them some bones.. Some money too.. Slowly slowly bc they initially put forth a unique product are building on that...

    Narrow minded thinking will get you cornered in a back alley with a foamy mouthed dog wearing a tootoo and a tiara... Yea.. Makes no sense

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
  7. #7  
    <<closed>>

    The OP had something Positive that he wanted to discuss.
    Can we have one thread for those who look forward to good things coming to webOS?

    Thanks,
    Berd
    Just call me Berd.

Posting Permissions