Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 56
  1.    #1  
    There's been a lot of discussion on the boards of the irrelevance of spec wars to the average consumer, and that Apple is winning the day because they have a seamless, rich user experience that essentially sells their devices for them.

    I don't disagree with any of that, but I think that Palm blew it on selling the Pre by not stressing the unique user experience that webOS offers. To put it into one word, webOS offers "flow."

    The other night I was sitting at a bar with my overclocked, 2.1-packing Pre- checking and replying to email, doing a crossword, monitoring and posting to Twitter, surfing the web, and sending text messages. With a stock Pre- I occasionally experienced the beauty of swiping through apps and menus as implemented in WebOS, but with this machine I was *blazing* through this stuff and truly multitasking--*I* was multitasking as much as the Pre, in other words, and when webOS is running well it is one of the most pleasing and productive experiences I've ever had with any device. Period. Including desktop machines. A few times I paused, with a smile on my face, and said to myself, "I love using this phone."

    Palm didn't seem to have the taste for doing outright user experience comparisons in their commercials, but I think it would have served them well. Imagine an ad that has an iOS user sitting next to a webOS user (this gap has narrowed in the ensuring years, but still . . . ) and just laying out explicitly how each device would accomplish similar tasks. ("Oh, really? I just do this. [Snarky webOS user does a left swipe.])

    In short, rather than concede user experience to Apple and focus on specs, in their advertising and training of reps they need to be aggressive and fearless about the beauty of webOS when it's running well, and lay that right out on the table against iOS and Android.
  2. cgk
    cgk is offline
    cgk's Avatar
    Posts
    3,868 Posts
    Global Posts
    9,556 Global Posts
    #2  
    Just as an aside with out getting into the pros and cons of that marketing approaching - The funny paradox about everyone pushing multi-tasking on devices is that everything we know about how people seek, use and manage information tells that us that monochronistic behaviour (concentrating on one task at a time and completing it before moving to the next) is way more productive than polychronistic behaviour.

    So yes, great multi-tasking is great from an OS point of view, but everything we know about actual humans tells us it's terrible from a productivity point of view.
  3.    #3  
    Right, but I think the research has been done with truly simultaneous stimuli, where the "multitasking" I'm describing is more like very efficient "serial monotasking." Notifications add a true multitasking aspect (in the cognitive sense), but they're fairly unobtrusive and not really competing equally with the main task.

    It's anecdotal, of course, but a great part of the pleasure I experienced is that I *was* being productive, in a setting where that would be difficult otherwise.

    Wait, I was multitasking: Pre use and beer-drinking.
  4. cgk
    cgk is offline
    cgk's Avatar
    Posts
    3,868 Posts
    Global Posts
    9,556 Global Posts
    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by grappler View Post
    Right, but I think the research has been done with truly simultaneous stimuli, where the "multitasking" I'm describing is more like very efficient "serial monotasking." Notifications add a true multitasking aspect (in the cognitive sense), but they're fairly unobtrusive and not really competing equally with the main task.

    It's anecdotal, of course, but a great part of the pleasure I experienced is that I *was* being productive, in a setting where that would be difficult otherwise.

    Wait, I was multitasking: Pre use and beer-drinking.
    OK, I'll accept that

    The rest needs a bit more research (and mobility is still a very under-researched area in lots of areas, I concentrate on information seeking behaviour mainly), even with 'serial monotask', the disruption and switching between activities is seen to reduce overall productivity. Often the most productive use of your phone is to turn it off.
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    No offense, but that's not an experience that most people aspire to. When you show people playing musical instruments into their tablet or editing movies then people start thinking that they could be amateur music producers or filmmakers. Multitasking isn't an aspirational activity for most people.
    I think if sold in an informal way it could be appealing. It doesn't have to be all work and no play. Part of the power of Apple's commercials is their informality. I was thinking in terms of phones. If applied to a tablet, I don't see why it couldn't apply equally well to music composition or film editing software.

    I know, I know, apps . . . .
  6. #6  
    Under real world terminology:

    You play a game, then get an email notification. You immediately use that notification to read the email, and see its very important to respond right away, so you do. In the middle of composing that email, you need to include a link to a website for a file download, so, you go to the browser to start it and go to the web site and copy the URL, but, then you get a text message from your wife telling you that if you don't bring milk home tonight, don't bother coming home, so, you text message a reply, then go back to the email and paste it into it and finish your email, and then, go back to the game you were playing while you were supposed to be working, at the very point you left it.

    Now, this is what we call "multitasking" - its really a series of performing task in a linear fashion very quickly, because all of the applications are open and running sumultanteously, allowing you to switch back n forth between them easily, and even share information between them, all while never losing your place in what you were doing.

    However you want to market that, THIS is what people, the consumer needs and wants.

    Each does it in its own unique way... we WebOS users feel that WebOS handles it in the most efficient and intuitive way available in any OS today; we feel that most who do this in other OS's would absolutely agree with us if they tried it under WebOS; we could be wrong, heck, we MIGHT be wrong, but, we don't think so.

    Having said that, iOS users don't seem to be complaining.. yet. Android users do, but deal with it.

    Anyway, call it what you want to.. but the above is what is needed by the average user, I believe, and it will only become MORE intensive as the market and the usability of smartphones spreads, matures and has even more functionality.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  7. #7  
    marketing multitasking isn't a bad idea, providing that it's done in the correct way

    If you just say "we offer true multitasking" people aren't going to care, nor understand.

    The average consumer is not very educated when it comes to technology.

    Thus, you have to "dumb it down" to a level where they can understand. That's why apple's ads are effective for the average consumer.

    LCGuy had hit it's mark.

    You have to show the average daily persons tasks while being able to multitask. And if they want to get kids attention, you show a commercial playing a video game while answer a text message, then coming back to the game at it's saved point.

    The old commercial of that chick walking around swiping cards left right off the screen doesn't cut it. The average consumer doesn't get it.
  8.    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Under real world terminology:

    You play a game, then get an email notification. You immediately use that notification to read the email, and see its very important to respond right away, so you do. In the middle of composing that email, you need to include a link to a website for a file download, so, you go to the browser to start it and go to the web site and copy the URL, but, then you get a text message from your wife telling you that if you don't bring milk home tonight, don't bother coming home, so, you text message a reply, then go back to the email and paste it into it and finish your email, and then, go back to the game you were playing while you were supposed to be working, at the very point you left it.

    Now, this is what we call "multitasking" - its really a series of performing task in a linear fashion very quickly, because all of the applications are open and running sumultanteously, allowing you to switch back n forth between them easily, and even share information between them, all while never losing your place in what you were doing.

    However you want to market that, THIS is what people, the consumer needs and wants.

    Each does it in its own unique way... we WebOS users feel that WebOS handles it in the most efficient and intuitive way available in any OS today; we feel that most who do this in other OS's would absolutely agree with us if they tried it under WebOS; we could be wrong, heck, we MIGHT be wrong, but, we don't think so.

    Having said that, iOS users don't seem to be complaining.. yet. Android users do, but deal with it.

    Anyway, call it what you want to.. but the above is what is needed by the average user, I believe, and it will only become MORE intensive as the market and the usability of smartphones spreads, matures and has even more functionality.

    That pretty much expresses my point of view, too. BTW, Stacks is a surprisingly cool thing for the type of activity you describe. It's great to have Web page associated with the tweet you opened it from, or the email you opened it from. I didn't think much about it when they first announced it way back when, but I really like it.
  9.    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by kjb86 View Post
    marketing multitasking isn't a bad idea, providing that it's done in the correct way

    If you just say "we offer true multitasking" people aren't going to care, nor understand.

    The average consumer is not very educated when it comes to technology.

    Thus, you have to "dumb it down" to a level where they can understand. That's why apple's ads are effective for the average consumer.

    LCGuy had hit it's mark.

    You have to show the average daily persons tasks while being able to multitask. And if they want to get kids attention, you show a commercial playing a video game while answer a text message, then coming back to the game at it's saved point.

    The old commercial of that chick walking around swiping cards left right off the screen doesn't cut it. The average consumer doesn't get it.
    Yep.
  10. #10  
    Well, multitasking is just one part of the experience they have to market. The notification system is great, Synergy is an awesome feature, and they'll soon have Touch-to-share and webOS on PCs to market. They already have a very nice integrated experience to sell, and with the new devices coming with new features, that experience will become even better.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by CGK View Post
    ...
    So yes, great multi-tasking is great from an OS point of view, but everything we know about actual humans tells us it's terrible from a productivity point of view.
    Note the original post:
    Quote Originally Posted by grappler View Post
    ...
    The other night I was sitting at a bar with my overclocked, 2.1-packing Pre- checking and replying to email, doing a crossword, monitoring and posting to Twitter, surfing the web, and sending text messages.
    I own a sailboat. Powerboat guys regularly tell me sailing is too slow. Sometimes, speed or productivity isn't the issue.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Under real world terminology:

    You play a game, then get an email notification. You immediately use that notification to read the email, and see its very important to respond right away, so you do. In the middle of composing that email, you need to include a link to a website for a file download, so, you go to the browser to start it and go to the web site and copy the URL, but, then you get a text message from your wife telling you that if you don't bring milk home tonight, don't bother coming home, so, you text message a reply, then go back to the email and paste it into it and finish your email, and then, go back to the game you were playing while you were supposed to be working, at the very point you left it.

    Now, this is what we call "multitasking" -


    This is not a unique experience to Android users, or iPhone users.

    You might say you do it more elegantly but then you need to sell the "elegance" not the activity.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    This is not a unique experience to Android users, or iPhone users. .
    I never said it was, in fact, I said that "iOS users don't seem to be complaining.. yet. Android users do, but deal with it."

    In light of the above, Im not sure what your point is.

    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    You might say you do it more elegantly but then you need to sell the "elegance" not the activity.
    Actually, I said:

    "we WebOS users feel that WebOS handles it in the most efficient and intuitive way available in any OS today; we feel that most who do this in other OS's would absolutely agree with us if they tried it under WebOS; we could be wrong, heck, we MIGHT be wrong, but, we don't think so"

    Every user will have their own preference - in the end, its the number of users that fall either side of those lines that will decide for the predomination of users.

    However HP markets this particular aspect of WebOS, it doesnt change what we feel, and you feel, and those loyalists to other OS's feel's about it - its just one of many capabilities to boast about - is it too abstract for the average user to truly appreciate?

    Yes, I'd have to agree with that - they hear the "Droid Does" commercials on the radio, bragging about being the "magna-cume-laude of multitaskers" - and the average person feels testosterone rushing through his veins with "all that power", despite the reality behind it's implementation.

    I don't know what the answer to this is, but, perhaps, today, we'll get a clue from Mr. A.

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  14. #14  
    I didn't mean to sound like I was disagreeing with your thoughts. Just pointing out that since the activity (mt'ing) is parallel, you have to market the way you do the activity. Not the activity.

    But in re-reading your para I guess we're on the same page about that.

    To me (as a marketing professional) it is an issue of *branding* not marketing - and I've said that several times in here.

    It's not the "Droid Does" commercial that is appealing but the brand it is acquiring by running them. Apple's brand for i-Products is pretty clear.

    The question is what will HP's brand be? They need to step far outside everything else they have ever done with customers, and wrap an image around this WebOS lifestyle.

    They haven't done it yet.

    They started to - rather Palm did - with Creepy Lady but no one liked it (personally, I think you need to let commercials like that live for a lot longer than they did - before dismissing the branding attempt... but I know I am in the minority on that.

    Successful branding is a many-year exercise in patience, often.



    Just that
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    I never said it was, in fact, I said that "iOS users don't seem to be complaining.. yet. Android users do, but deal with it."

    In light of the above, Im not sure what your point is.



    Actually, I said:

    "we WebOS users feel that WebOS handles it in the most efficient and intuitive way available in any OS today; we feel that most who do this in other OS's would absolutely agree with us if they tried it under WebOS; we could be wrong, heck, we MIGHT be wrong, but, we don't think so"

    Every user will have their own preference - in the end, its the number of users that fall either side of those lines that will decide for the predomination of users.

    However HP markets this particular aspect of WebOS, it doesnt change what we feel, and you feel, and those loyalists to other OS's feel's about it - its just one of many capabilities to boast about - is it too abstract for the average user to truly appreciate?

    Yes, I'd have to agree with that - they hear the "Droid Does" commercials on the radio, bragging about being the "magna-cume-laude of multitaskers" - and the average person feels testosterone rushing through his veins with "all that power", despite the reality behind it's implementation.

    I don't know what the answer to this is, but, perhaps, today, we'll get a clue from Mr. A.

  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by grappler View Post
    Yep.
    In my eyes their newest videos they have with the girl, musician and such.. they have the right idea.. the right message, they just need to convey it a little "dumber" for the average person for them to get the message.

    It's a start, nonetheless.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post
    I didn't mean to sound like I was disagreeing with your thoughts. Just pointing out that since the activity (mt'ing) is parallel, you have to market the way you do the activity. Not the activity.

    But in re-reading your para I guess we're on the same page about that.

    To me (as a marketing professional) it is an issue of *branding* not marketing - and I've said that several times in here.

    It's not the "Droid Does" commercial that is appealing but the brand it is acquiring by running them. Apple's brand for i-Products is pretty clear.

    The question is what will HP's brand be? They need to step far outside everything else they have ever done with customers, and wrap an image around this WebOS lifestyle.

    They haven't done it yet.

    They started to - rather Palm did - with Creepy Lady but no one liked it (personally, I think you need to let commercials like that live for a lot longer than they did - before dismissing the branding attempt... but I know I am in the minority on that.

    Successful branding is a many-year exercise in patience, often.

    Just that
    Finngirl;

    I agree, that we agree (and very well stated, in fact!)

    "The more I learn, the more I realize just how little I really do know!" -Albert Einstein

  17.    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by finngirl View Post

    To me (as a marketing professional) it is an issue of *branding* not marketing - and I've said that several times in here.

    It's not the "Droid Does" commercial that is appealing but the brand it is acquiring by running them. Apple's brand for i-Products is pretty clear.

    The question is what will HP's brand be? They need to step far outside everything else they have ever done with customers, and wrap an image around this WebOS lifestyle.

    They haven't done it yet.
    That's a good way of thinking about it. I would imagine a lot of people here would say that Palm had a *golden* brand, but squandered it for some reason.
  18. #18  
    In the simplest of terms (and yes, I know it is much more complicated than this), they had a brand supporting business productivity, and tossed it aside to chase Apple's brand. Leaving their business/PIM users in the lurch.

    Apple didn't even attempt the biz market when it launched the iPhone.

    And then when Palm tried to add on features, one of its biggest pushes was gaming. ?!

    Had Palm focused as much on business productivity (mostly fixing what didn't work, or was missing) I think Apple would be behind RIM and HP as the business brand.
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by LCGuy View Post
    Under real world terminology:

    You play a game...get an email...respond...copy the URL...get a text...reply...finish your email...go back to the game...at the very point you left it.

    Now, this is what we call "multitasking"...
    That's a part of it but people do so much more now. Email, games, text, and browsing might just be the first and last things you do...

    → Play a game, reply to an email, look up a link, paste it in, get a text.
    → While driving, get another text, "Gift for bday party". Oh no! Forgot!
    → Use speech to text to reply (so you don't get a ticket): "Getting it"
    → The price at the store is ridiculous. Barcode Scanner shows Best Buy has it on sale.
    → Shazam a song you hear to see who it is. Rip an MP3 of it.
    → Best Buy tries to charge you full price. You show them their ad online.
    → Reply to a Facebook, "Where are you?"
    → Visual Voicemail says the party is now at Olive Garden.
    → Say, "Navigate to Olive Garden" and it takes you to the party.
    → Take photos & HD video & post on Facebook.
    → Bump photos and new mp3 to friends and Bump a new phone number.
    → Back home, go back where you left off in the new book you downloaded from Amazon.

    → Finish the email. Go back where you left off in the game.

    Email, browser, text, and games are still important but people expect a lot more than that now.

    We need to show a user doing the everyday things simply, easily, and quickly. The key is in the 100,000 apps that Jon Rubinstein said are coming to webOS.

    No one is doing a commercial showing someone actually doing these things. By June HP should have all of this and could show it. The first one to show it will always be remembered as the one who invented it. That can be us.
    Last edited by milominderbinder; 03/15/2011 at 01:59 PM.
  20. #20  
    They can sell synergy, when iOS 5 comes out they can sell touch-to-share, later this year they can sell webOS on your PC, there's a lot of things they can sell.

    There's a lot more to webOS than multitasking people...

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions