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  1.    #1  
    WoodWing announces publishing support for the TouchPad.

    Do you remember the Feb 9th HP webos event when the Times Inc CEO himself gave us a long demo of how all their magazines will work on the TouchPad ?

    The company who is behind the software is WoodWing and today Feb 21st announced full support for all the digital editions of Times Inc magazines and more to come.

    WoodWing developed a native Reader App for HP webOS to enable publishers to also serve their readers using webOs devices.

    Multi-Screen functionality offered by WoodWing´s Tablet Publishing Solution enables publishers to create content for multiple devices almost effortlessly.

    A video ad:


    The full press Release here:

    Support for TouchPad, HP’s new webOS Tablet
    WoodWing also announces publishing support For HP TouchPad, HP’s New webOS Tablet

    Digital Editions of Time Magazine, PEOPLE Magazine and Sports Illustrated created with WoodWing´s tablet-publishing solution featured on HP TouchPad during HP’s launch event for new HP webOS devices.

    ZAANDAM, The Netherlands (February 21, 2011) – WoodWing Software announced today that the company’s software supports publishing on the HP TouchPad tablet, first introduced by HP on February 9 at its “Think Beyond” launch event in San Francisco. The HP TouchPad was also presented at the Mobile World Congress, which took place in Barcelona, Spain, from February 14-17.

    During the launch event, digital editions of Time Magazine, PEOPLE Magazine and Sports Illustrated created with WoodWing´s tablet publishing solution were shown on the HP TouchPad tablet. WoodWing developed a native Reader App for HP webOS to enable publishers to also serve their readers using webOS devices.

    “I am very impressed with the HP TouchPad – it's nicely built, very user-friendly and it looks simply great,” said Erik Schut, President of WoodWing Software. “But what a technical person like me appreciates the most is that HP webOS supports native HTML5. This is a great basis for now and the future. As it is part of our strategy to support all platforms relevant for our customers, we are pleased to include the webOS platform for publishers at this early stage.”

    Multi-Screen functionality ensures efficient multi-platform tablet publishing
    WoodWing’s tablet-publishing solution comprises the cross-media publishing system Enterprise – including the content management application Content Station – and the Digital Magazine Tools.

    The solution ensures a highly efficient tablet-publishing workflow and allows publishers of any size the ability to deliver an outstanding user experience on the various tablet devices due to the use of native Reader Apps. The new Multi-Screen functionality offered by WoodWing´s Tablet Publishing Solution enables publishers to create content for multiple devices almost effortlessly. A short video presentation of this new feature can be found on WoodWing´s YouTube Channel. YouTube - WoodWingSoftware's Channel

    Source: Support for TouchPad, HP’s new webOS Tablet | WoodWing.com
  2. mike5's Avatar
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    #2  
    Very cool. Thanks for the post.
  3. #3  
    Somewhat related to the topic, but are people really looking for electronic magazines on a tablet?

    I mean, didn’t electronic magazines evolve over a decade ago… when we named them webpages?

    Don’t get me wrong, I still like to get a couple of real, paper-based magazines to read. But I don’t see any desire for mimicking a magazine on a tablet. At least, I don’t see it as any different/better than just offering all the same content on a webpage.

    At best, I see “electronic magazines” as a rather thinly veiled attempt by publishers trying to recapture a market on the internet that they let go many years back when they started publishing their articles free on their websites. Now nobody wants to pay for access to a website (notable exception being the WSJ) so they try to repackage this same content as an “electronic magazine.”

    Am I not seeing the value of an “electronic magazine?” Anyone that has/uses them, what added value is there that can’t be provided through a traditional webpage?

    -Suntan
  4. #4  
    I have to say...I don't see the value either. Of the few magazines still left in existence that I read, few are enhanced by being available in an electronic edition. And those (occasionally Revolver and almost always Guitar World and Guitar Player) already have their multimedia content broken apart in "apps" or in Guitar World's case, a dedicated PC player (content is free if you purchase the issue).

    But the rest is mostly stuff I read on the web already. I guess it'd be kinda neat if every publication were available simultaneously in print and on the smartphone platform of your choice in a third party app that would be like the MOG.com of magazines. But the internet has supplanted a lot of this stuff already.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    I have to say...I don't see the value either. Of the few magazines still left in existence that I read, few are enhanced by being available in an electronic edition. And those (occasionally Revolver and almost always Guitar World and Guitar Player) already have their multimedia content broken apart in "apps" or in Guitar World's case, a dedicated PC player (content is free if you purchase the issue).

    But the rest is mostly stuff I read on the web already. I guess it'd be kinda neat if every publication were available simultaneously in print and on the smartphone platform of your choice in a third party app that would be like the MOG.com of magazines. But the internet has supplanted a lot of this stuff already.
    I agree with the second part of your post. I also think that there are certain magazines worth reading even if they are not completely up to date. I do prefer an app that can download everything and allow me to read it quicker than through a website. This would be helpful for newspapers or magazines.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by pavvento View Post
    I also think that there are certain magazines worth reading even if they are not completely up to date.
    Funny enough, I prefer to read most of the financial magazines at least a month or two after publication.

    The articles that are still applicable two months after publishing are usually the only ones that are worth reading in the first place. The articles that prognosticate about the performance of any given company or sector are usually proven wrong within that time period.

    -Suntan
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    I have to say...I don't see the value either.
    Man bites dog. Alerting media. Camera crews rolling. Film at 11.

    Last edited by Cantaffordit; 02/22/2011 at 06:06 PM.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    Ma bites dog. Alerting media. Camera crews rolling. Film at 11.

    Somone's mom bit a dog?
  9. #9  
    yeah to me not really a huge benifit, to me books is something else, but most content in magazines are seen on the web. I guess this is good that we have more developers supporting, but we need HP of course to make sure they focus on the main ones, that develop the most popular applications right now.
  10.    #10  
    In this new age there are preferences . I read the local newspapers from Monday to Saturday on the internet but in Sunday I really like to buy the paper version, go to the mall have a express coffee , listen jazz via BT, and enjoy about 2 hours all the way reading them. Well, sometimes I catch some techs news for my blog , and I start writing a little.

    But if I have 1000 books in my library I would really want ot carry all of them on a e-reader or a tablet.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    Somewhat related to the topic, but are people really looking for electronic magazines on a tablet?

    -Suntan
    I used to think so too, but now believe that it first depends on how it is implemented. My favorite app of all time is the Pulse reader, as I can get content from all of my favorite spots on the web with one click and a couple of swipes. Going to a browser and a tab for each one isn't nearly as nice.

    Secondly, if you take Kindle as an example, where you get a subscription and it just gets downloaded in the background on a daily/monthly basis and is there live on your device, you can read stuff on a plane or anywhere else you might not have connectivity. Moreover, you don't have to wait for a download after every click in the middle of your reading. It's a whole different animal than going to the web page, particularly if you've got a number of subscriptions.
  12. #12  
    What you have just explained is not an electronic magazine. It's a feed agrigator. You can get them free and set them up to grab any type of feeds you want.

    Just look at the free NYT app for the pre. It does what you suggest, complete with the ability to cache stories for offline reading.

    In any case, pulse reader isn't the same thing as, say, the electronic version of "People."

    -Suntan

    Quote Originally Posted by GMoney749 View Post
    I used to think so too, but now believe that it first depends on how it is implemented. My favorite app of all time is the Pulse reader, as I can get content from all of my favorite spots on the web with one click and a couple of swipes. Going to a browser and a tab for each one isn't nearly as nice.

    Secondly, if you take Kindle as an example, where you get a subscription and it just gets downloaded in the background on a daily/monthly basis and is there live on your device, you can read stuff on a plane or anywhere else you might not have connectivity. Moreover, you don't have to wait for a download after every click in the middle of your reading. It's a whole different animal than going to the web page, particularly if you've got a number of subscriptions.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    What you have just explained is not an electronic magazine. It's a feed agrigator. You can get them free and set them up to grab any type of feeds you want.

    Just look at the free NYT app for the pre. It does what you suggest, complete with the ability to cache stories for offline reading.

    In any case, pulse reader isn't the same thing as, say, the electronic version of "People."

    -Suntan
    I know, sorry, two separate points and I guess it came out kind of jumbled. What I really meant was that something like Kindle does both; aggregates my books/magazines into one application so I don't have to go clicking around all over the web in a browser, AND it delivers the FULL pubs behind the scenes onto the device so I can read them even when I'm disconnected and without having to wait for a download every time I click a new article or go to a new page. Swiping to turn a page is way more elegant than finding and clicking a link and waiting for a page to load.

    That may not have value for everyone, but I can see the attraction. My Tab experience would be much more fulfilling if there were more available. Or if Kindle had more publications and those versions had rich content.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by GMoney749 View Post
    Swiping to turn a page is way more elegant than finding and clicking a link and waiting for a page to load.
    Yes... It's a mystery if this internet thing will ever really take off with these horrid link-clicking requirements.

    -Suntan
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    Yes... It's a mystery if this internet thing will ever really take off with these horrid link-clicking requirements.

    -Suntan
    Wow. So, you're telling me that you can't understand why people would buy a tablet and prefer to have a book-like experience while using it?

    On prom night did you take the limo or your mom's Volvo station wagon? They'll both get you there.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by GMoney749 View Post
    Wow. So, you're telling me that you can't understand why people would buy a tablet and prefer to have a book-like experience while using it?

    On prom night did you take the limo or your mom's Volvo station wagon? They'll both get you there.
    Hey, I love it as much as the next guy when the inaccurate analogies start flowing, but how about we just stick to the topic at hand.

    First, I tend to believe that *a well laid out webpage* has a lot more functionality and usability than an electro-periodical with silly “page flipping” animations to remind people what it looks like when you turn a real page. So I don’t agree with the premise that “swiping to turn a page is way more elegant than clicking a link.” Judging by the fact that you could easily implement silly page turn animations inside current html code, and yet pretty much no traditional website uses it, I would suggest that I’m not alone. So calm down with the silly accusations and analogies.

    But just to go with this for a minute, what would you say are the main ingredients in having a "book-like experience?"

    Is it the fact that you don’t have links to specific subjects in the text so that you are forced to continue reading everything the author wrote, even though you may be more interested in reading about a particular topic that they just glanced over?

    Is it that swiping your finger across a lit up LCD display and seeing an animation of a page being turned fools your mind into thinking you are holding a paper periodical?

    Is it something else?

    Now, with that said, I can see how being able to download the content in its entirety would be beneficial for a person that would like to consume the content while “off the grid.”

    If the main advantage of “electronic magazines” is to allow for viewing while off the network, then ok, I guess. I mean, it sounds feasible that someone would pay for the convenience. But at the same time, you can get that functionality with any number of news aggregators for free.

    If, on the other hand, the main compelling feature to e-magazines is the page flipping animation… I just don’t understand that rationale.

    -Suntan
  17. #17  
    I wouldn't mind a magazine app, simply so that I can have the magazine visual experience w/o the having to keep up w/ the book and w/o having to be on the network. Also, i'd rather do my lazy boy reading on tablet than on a laptop...
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Suntan View Post
    Hey, I love it as much as the next guy when the inaccurate analogies start flowing, but how about we just stick to the topic at hand.

    First, I tend to believe that *a well laid out webpage* has a lot more functionality and usability than an electro-periodical with silly “page flipping” animations to remind people what it looks like when you turn a real page. So I don’t agree with the premise that “swiping to turn a page is way more elegant than clicking a link.” Judging by the fact that you could easily implement silly page turn animations inside current html code, and yet pretty much no traditional website uses it, I would suggest that I’m not alone. So calm down with the silly accusations and analogies.

    But just to go with this for a minute, what would you say are the main ingredients in having a "book-like experience?"

    Is it the fact that you don’t have links to specific subjects in the text so that you are forced to continue reading everything the author wrote, even though you may be more interested in reading about a particular topic that they just glanced over?

    Is it that swiping your finger across a lit up LCD display and seeing an animation of a page being turned fools your mind into thinking you are holding a paper periodical?

    Is it something else?

    Now, with that said, I can see how being able to download the content in its entirety would be beneficial for a person that would like to consume the content while “off the grid.”

    If the main advantage of “electronic magazines” is to allow for viewing while off the network, then ok, I guess. I mean, it sounds feasible that someone would pay for the convenience. But at the same time, you can get that functionality with any number of news aggregators for free.

    If, on the other hand, the main compelling feature to e-magazines is the page flipping animation… I just don’t understand that rationale.

    -Suntan
    How about you look back through my post and find where I said anything about a page turning animation. I'll wait.






    A desktop and a tablet are two different platforms and maybe, just maybe, the applications you use on them could be tailored to work best on each. I never said the web was a bad thing, or reading news in a browser was ridiculous, all I've ever said is that I understand why people would want a custom app to read magazines. For some reason you seem to find that outrageous.

    Enjoy your Volvo wagon.
  19. #19  
    Where the heck do you get this app from. I can't find it anywhere.

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