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  1. vreihen's Avatar
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       #1  
    Just saw this article on Yahoo Finance, and thought that it contained some interesting manufacturing timeframes:

    http://http://finance.yahoo.com/fami...ady-a-dinosaur

    A couple of notable take-aways:

    The average time smartphones spend on the market is now just six to nine months, according to HTC. But it wasn't always this way: Average shelf time was about three years prior to 2007, HTC estimates.
    (Obviously, shelf time is/was a problem for the Pre, and the carriers have liquidated their inventory based on the above reality.)

    The Qualcomm/Android ("Quadroid") standard that has developed over the past couple of years has freed up smartphone manufacturers to focus most of their attention on marketing and making their devices thinner, sleeker and higher-functioning than competitors'.

    As a result, smartphone manufacturing cycles have doubled in speed in the past two years to just over four months, according to industry consultancy PRTM.
    To compete against Quadroid, HP will need to keep their rumored schedule of releasing a new phone every two months.

    Here's another interesting article on car integration that also provides some food for thought:

    http://http://money.cnn.com/2011/01/...apps/index.htm

    HP needs to be a key player in this sandbox, IMHO.....
  2. #2  
    This is old news
  3. jdlashley's Avatar
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    #3  
    Apple releases 1 phone every year, and they're doing pretty well. I think it all comes down to differentiation, not flooding the market with phone after phone. Hopefully HP can do that.
  4. cgk
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    #4  
    Weird, although both of your links look correct, they are both missing : when you click on them.

    Android's law has allowed new, previously unknown competitors like ZTE to double its market share and become the fourth-largest mobile phone vendor in the world.
    <polishes 80 ZTE Blade>
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by nns View Post
    Apple releases 1 phone every year, and they're doing pretty well. I think it all comes down to differentiation, not flooding the market with phone after phone. Hopefully HP can do that.
    What? You mean like HTC does? They seem to be doing real good right now...
  6. #6  
    HTC and Apple have very different business models. Easy for HTC to churn out model after model when they don't use their own OS, HP will probably have to develop a hybrid (other than the iPhone, I don't believe a phone system can survive with just 1 model anymore). Apple does 1 yearly refresh. I think HP should have 3-4 models per year, each one refreshed 1x per year at a different time. Every spring the new slab comes out, every summer the new portrait slider, every fall the new pixi style phone, ever winter the new landscape slider or watch phone or whatever HP decides to go with.

    This way they can always be coming out with new phones and staying relevant and incrementally upgrading specs and the OS.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Courousant View Post
    HTC and Apple have very different business models. Easy for HTC to churn out model after model when they don't use their own OS, HP will probably have to develop a hybrid (other than the iPhone, I don't believe a phone system can survive with just 1 model anymore). Apple does 1 yearly refresh. I think HP should have 3-4 models per year, each one refreshed 1x per year at a different time. Every spring the new slab comes out, every summer the new portrait slider, every fall the new pixi style phone, ever winter the new landscape slider or watch phone or whatever HP decides to go with.

    This way they can always be coming out with new phones and staying relevant and incrementally upgrading specs and the OS.
    Exactly.

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