Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1.    #1  
    <snap> whole post deleted...by mod...
  2. #2  
    To Administrator,

    Pls. get this crap out of here.
    Ed
    Visor Deluxe, Prism, Visorphone, Treo 270, Treo 600, Treo 650, and am eagerly waiting for the next generation Treo...but wait...is that the iPhone????
  3. #3  
    I don't know how many cigarettes those dollar bills are gonna buy you in federal prison once you're arrested for operating an illegal pyramid scheme tho.
  4. #4  
    Not only is it illegal, but it's an OLD con. I can't believe people still fall for this crap.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  5. #5  
    Originally posted by Insp_Gadget
    Not only is it illegal, but it's an OLD con. I can't believe people still fall for this crap.
    Clearly not enough fall for it as it seems the con artists can't even afford a keyboard with an enter key to put paragraphs in their messages...
  6.    #6  
    you can all bite my delicious [ ] you guys are all obviously very creative- fill in the blank...
  7. #7  
    What is of particular interest is the legal opinion expressed in elcidroyale's solicitation:

    "Like most of us I was a little skeptical and worried about the legal aspects of it all. So I checked it with the U.S. Post Office (1`- 800-725-2161) and they confirmed that it was indeed legal."

    To counter such assurances, the United States Post Office maintains a webpage indicating that these solitations may violate Title 18, United States Code, Section 1302. Specifically, the following information is provided:

    ---------------------
    A chain letter is a "get rich quick" scheme that promises that your mail box will soon be stuffed full of cash if you decide to participate. You're told you can make thousands of dollars every month if you follow the detailed instructions in the letter.

    A typical chain letter includes names and addresses of several individuals whom you may or may not know. You are instructed to send a certain amount of money--usually $5--to the person at the top of the list, and then eliminate that name and add yours to the bottom. You are then instructed to mail copies of the letter to a few more individuals who will hopefully repeat the entire process. The letter promises that if they follow the same procedure, your name will gradually move to the top of the list and you'll receive money -- lots of it.

    There's at least one problem with chain letters. They're illegal if they request money or other items of value and promise a substantial return to the participants. Chain letters are a form of gambling, and sending them through the mail (or delivering them in person or by computer, but mailing money to participate) violates Title 18, United States Code, Section 1302, the Postal Lottery Statute. (Chain letters that ask for items of minor value, like picture postcards or recipes, may be mailed, since such items are not things of value within the meaning of the law.)

    Recently, high-tech chain letters have begun surfacing. They may be disseminated over the Internet, or may require the copying and mailing of computer disks rather than paper. Regardless of what technology is used to advance the scheme, if the mail is used at any step along the way, it is still illegal.

    The main thing to remember is that a chain letter is simply a bad investment. You certainly won't get rich. You will receive little or no money. The few dollars you may get will probably not be as much as you spend making and mailing copies of the chain letter.

    Chain letters don't work because the promise that all participants in a chain letter will be winners is mathematically impossible. Also, many people participate, but do not send money to the person at the top of the list. Some others create a chain letter that lists their name numerous times--in various forms with different addressee. So, in reality, all the money in a chain is going to one person.

    Do not be fooled if the chain letter is used to sell inexpensive reports on credit, mail order sales, mailing lists, or other topics. The primary purpose is to take your money, not to sell information. "Selling" a product does not ensure legality. Be doubly suspicious if there's a claim that the U.S. Postal Service or U.S. Postal Inspection Service has declared the letter legal. This is said only to mislead you. Neither the Postal Service nor Postal Inspectors give prior approval to any chain letter.

    Participating in a chain letter is a losing proposition. Turn over any chain letter you receive that asks for money or other items of value to your local postmaster or nearest Postal Inspector. Write on the mailing envelope of the letter or in a separate transmittal letter, "I received this in the mail and believe it may be illegal."
    ---------------------
    http://www.usps.com/websites/depart/...t/chainlet.htm
    Last edited by tcc; 09/27/2002 at 11:43 AM.
  8. #8  
    Originally posted by elcidroyale
    you can all bite my delicious [ ] you guys are all obviously very creative- fill in the blank...
    I can see you've managed to provide yourself with a creative and witty education with all that money pouring into your mailbox!

    The beauty of the electronic age and pyramid schemes is that it is so easy to track all the idiots that subscribe to them. Makes it easier for me to auto-ignore them and a LOT easier for the feds to track them down. Maybe we could use Pyramid Scheme participation as a filtering device for keeping people out of the gene pool - that kind of policy would probably raise the composite IQ of the human race 20-30 points by itself.

    Kupe

    elcidroyale: Hope you don't take too much offense, but when you've seen this sort of thing as long as I have, you'll get a chuckle out of it too.
  9. #9  
    It's actually kind of funny tho, just as an FYI, I called the postmaster general's office about it a few years ago and what they told me was that technically it's only illegal if you solicit money through actual mail (in other words, since the post office hasn't been involved as of yet, there's nothing for them to be concerned about).

    It might have changed since then, but I doubt it. In either case, I say just sign up the 4th or 5th addresses for a lot of third class junk mail. If the ******* set up the thing right, one of those addresses would be his. I'm guessing it might be the 4th since he names an Apt # which could just as easily be a mailboxes etc or whatnot.

    Speaking of which, I might be wrong about this, but as I live in NYC, I believe the 1 CPW address belongs to the new AOL Time Warner building that's currently under construction. There will be apartments, but clearly anyone who lives in them doesn't need a few extra $1 bills, and that's still at least a year or 2 off.
  10. #10  
    Originally posted by toxckrayon
    It's actually kind of funny tho, just as an FYI, I called the postmaster general's office about it a few years ago and what they told me was that technically it's only illegal if you solicit money through actual mail (in other words, since the post office hasn't been involved as of yet, there's nothing for them to be concerned about).

    It might have changed since then, but I doubt it. ...

    From the USPO:
    ...Recently, high-tech chain letters have begun surfacing. They may be disseminated over the Internet, or may require the copying and mailing of computer disks rather than paper. Regardless of what technology is used to advance the scheme, if the mail is used at any step along the way, it is still illegal. ...
    It's illegal, period, no matter how you slice it.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  11. #11  
    It's also important to note that pyramid schemes, chain letters, investment solicitations, or other similar endeavors often violate a number of laws simultaneously, including standard consumer protection regulations, securities regulations, commodities regulations, or gambling regulations.

    Based on the foregoing, and depending on the language of the solicitation, jurisdiction may be shared by the Federal Trade Commission, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and of course the aggressive state and local authorities.

    International regulatory or law enforcement agencies may also become involved, based on the global nature of the Internet. In fact, the usage of the Internet to distribute solicitations may expose the poster to civil and criminal liability in dozens of jurisdictions simultaneously.

    In fact, juisdictional issues can be quite complex. To help the public determine who to go to in the event of a problem, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C) established the Internet Fraud Complaint Center (IFCC) at www.ifccfbi.gov . Upon receipt of a complaint, the IFCC makes a preliminary legal and geographical jurisdictional analysis of the issues embodied in the complaint. The information is then forwarded relevent regulatory and law enforcement agencies.

    Other complaint databases exist as well, include those maintained by the agencies themselves, the Better Business Bureau, etc.
    Last edited by tcc; 09/27/2002 at 12:03 PM.
  12. #12  
    How in the world did this thread continue for so long?!?! Sorry bout that...

    Closing Thread - advertising isn't allowed in the general forums.. that and pyramid chain mail schemes...

    I will close this thread now and edit the post to get rid of addresses (which along with private direct emails, private phone numbers etc are also not allowed to be posted)
    -Michael Ducker
    TreoCentral Staff

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