Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1.    #1  
    (sorry, this is a bit off topic)

    something interesting i noticed while just browsing the internet today is that, many "Palm era" (1990-2005ish) companies, have been sorta coming back into relevance.

    Palm: well we know about Palm...., acquired by HP, Releasing new phones, (tablets) Feb.9......

    Polaroid:
    Announced a new instant camera and printer series with Lady Gaga & CES
    Polaroid 600 film is selling for crazy high prices on eBay....
    pioneering Z-ink Printing technology


    IBM: they're doing quite well....
    IBM - Watson

    IBM to Build Asia's Largest Cloud Computing Center - PCWorld Business Center

    | IBM plans to call share holder meeting: | TechWeek
  2. #2  
    IBM and Polaroid maybe, but how do you see Palm making a comeback? That's like saying VoodooPC and Compaq are making a comeback.
  3. #3  
    What a terrible analogy. VoodooPC and Compaq were Windows OEMs, Palm made their own OS. HP bought VoodooPC and Compaq to eliminate competition; they bought Palm for their intellectual property, namely webOS.

    Next thing you're gonna say is that HP bought Compaq because of their valuable know-how in putting together a windows box

    While the Palm brand may or may not be on it's way out, Palm's IP is indeed making a comeback. Or, you know, HP's announcement next month could be about dropping webOS and using android from here on in
  4. #4  
    It is more like HP is going boldly forward than Palm making a comeback.


    My Themes:CLICK HERE
  5.    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeisnowonfire View Post
    It is more like HP is going boldly forward than Palm making a comeback.
    (so true)
    [insert witty signature about how battery pulls solve everything..]

    Twitter
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    While the Palm brand may or may not be on it's way out, Palm's IP is indeed making a comeback. Or, you know, HP's announcement next month could be about dropping webOS and using android from here on in
    Next thing you'll say is Tim Paterson is making a comeback with Windows 7!
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by GodShapedHole View Post
    What a terrible analogy. VoodooPC and Compaq were Windows OEMs, Palm made their own OS. HP bought VoodooPC and Compaq to eliminate competition; they bought Palm for their intellectual property, namely webOS.

    Next thing you're gonna say is that HP bought Compaq because of their valuable know-how in putting together a windows box

    While the Palm brand may or may not be on it's way out, Palm's IP is indeed making a comeback. Or, you know, HP's announcement next month could be about dropping webOS and using android from here on in
    Compaq owned Tru-64, and OpenVMS and the storageworks line they acquired when they acquired DEC. They also owned NonStop. So I would say Compaq was more than a Windows OEM by the time HP acquired Compaq.

    NonStop and OpenVMS are still alive and supported, Tru-64 clustering (based on OpenVMS clustering) was supposed to be moved to HPUX but wasn't. Tru64 was also supposed to be supported for quite some time but wasn't. ****ed off a lot of Tru64 customers.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    Next thing you'll say is [url= Paterson[/url] is making a comeback with Windows 7!
    That's cool, because if you're comparing olde-tyme Palm to Tim Paterson and webOS to Windows 7 - nevermind how the decade or so between the time when he left Microsoft and the time Win7 was released compares to the months between Palm webOS 1.4 and HP webOS 2.0 - this is probably the first time I've seen you acknowledge that webOS has the potential of being a success... on the same scale as Windows 7

    Quote Originally Posted by zenzombie View Post
    NonStop and OpenVMS are still alive and supported, Tru-64 clustering (based on OpenVMS clustering) was supposed to be moved to HPUX but wasn't. Tru64 was also supposed to be supported for quite some time but wasn't. ****ed off a lot of Tru64 customers.
    None of that was really consumer-facing, but it also goes to show that contrary to what some people would like you to believe, HP doesn't buy companies / products just to kill them. Not that that would be a sound business strategy, but their general point seems to be that HP has none.
    The truth is, you simply can't offer everything to everybody - which is also why HP has abandoned the Android work we know they were at some point doing and which culminated in the Zeus printer / tablet combo. I think their decision to abandon Android may have ****ed off a lot of Android users as well... Just look how irate most of the ones on this forum are
    Last edited by GodShapedHole; 01/27/2011 at 07:01 PM.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions