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  1. #141  
    i'll buy everything with webOS on it.

    I want a HOME PHONE!
  2. spare's Avatar
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    #142  
    Great article mentions what's unique about a webOS netbook and also what struggles it will have.

    Can HP reignite the netbook market with webOS netbooks? | ITworld

    Can HP reignite the netbook market with webOS netbooks?

    ...

    What is new, according to Pre Central, is that the operating system will support and specifically references netbooks as one of the varying devices capable of running webOS. While there have been some brief mentions of webOS netbooks in the past, they've been pretty obscure and largely forgotten. After all, it's easy to think of netbooks as yesterday's technology with the success of the iPad and the launch of so many other tablets at CES.

    A webOS netbook is actually an interesting concept. webOS is a lightweight OS that should run very well as typical netbook hardware. Its interface places web and cloud services front and center (it is named webOS after all), much like Google's Chrome OS. One big difference is that webOS still features local apps and data storage. That could make webOS not just an interesting entrant into the tablet race, but a big competitor to Google's Chrome OS in the netbook space as well.

    There's also an interesting advantage for webOS when it comes to netbooks. It isn't a scaled down version of a desktop OS (like Windows 7 Starter) and it isn't completely dependent on the web and Internet access (like Chrome OS). It also isn't an OS that was developed in a vacuum. It is part of a range of devices that should all be able to run the same set of apps (perhaps with some variations as you see between the iPad and the iPhone). That gives it a unique and multifaceted appeal.

    What may be even more appealing is that webOS could offer a form of standardization that pretty much lacking in the mobile device market. A single OS could run on your phone, tablet, and the netbook you carry around with you to do tasks that require a more traditional PC or notebook like those that are easier to do with a physical keyboard and more full size screen (HP could even push the envelope and create full-sized webOS notebooks). That's a lot more unified from a user experience perspective (not to mention and IT deployment and management point of view) than say an Android phone, iPad, and Windows 7 Starter or Chrome OS netbook.

    Of course, that's exactly the sense of ease and value that HP is betting on with its webOS strategy. Whether it can pull that strategy off remains to be seen. Getting developers on board for webOS as a platform and making development easy for such a range of devices is going to be the biggest hurdle HP faces. Getting the public to buy into the concept will be the second biggest obstacle (made all that much more difficult by the lackluster launch of the Palm Pre and Palm Pixi and the general idea that webOS is a failed or marginal platform).

    What do you think? Is webOS a viable mobile platform for smartphones, tablets, netbooks, and printers? Would you consider buying a webOS netbook? Give us your take in the comments.
  3. #143  
    Well, one thing's for sure...a netbook lives and dies on its browser, so I'm excited to see the litany of improvements to the WebOS browser that would surely come with such a product. Way better memory management, tabs, the works....it's long overdue.

    I'm curious to see how much would scale down to the handsets as well.
  4. #144  
    I like the idea that webOS is being spread on as many devices as possible under one condition: Enough software/apps. We do need an office or the access to googledocs, we do need a photo editor and if they would make some music software available like Rebirth or Reason...ahh missing the video editor...of course the browser needs work...so if a real nice package of softwar is available - it should work out well with the marketing power of HP...
  5. #145  
    Who wants a webOS netbook?
    Not I....the things I use my Netbook for cannot be accomplished with webOS at the current time.

    A webOS netbook can't run MS Office applications. A webOS netbook can't connect me to the office VPN. A webOS netbook can't run my office Nortel VoIP app. A webOS netbook can't run Skype (outside of VZW) or any other programs like it. A webOS netbook can't run Adobe photo editing software. A webOS netbook can't run EndNote. A webOS netbook can't run.......the list goes on.

    While great for browsing the web and sending e-mail, beyond that, a webOS netbook would be a huge fail as it just wouldn't be able to do most of the things I can do with my current netbook. I'm not sure what HP has in mind with this idea.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  6. #146  
    If I was in charge of HP, I'd be using the "netbook" as a test mule for the adaptation of a laptop with webOS replacing Windows. As we all know, webOS is based on Linux so with enough work, you could get a webOS kernal that pretty much does everything Linux does, but with a tremendous amount of support. webOS cannot resurrect the netbook concept.

    The ultimate goal of HP would be to replace Windows altogether with Cloud and webOS, and that is definitely not a niche market, folks.
  7. #147  
    Quote Originally Posted by EvilKell View Post
    If I was in charge of HP, I'd be using the "netbook" as a test mule for the adaptation of a laptop with webOS replacing Windows. As we all know, webOS is based on Linux so with enough work, you could get a webOS kernal that pretty much does everything Linux does, but with a tremendous amount of support. webOS cannot resurrect the netbook concept.

    The ultimate goal of HP would be to replace Windows altogether with Cloud and webOS, and that is definitely not a niche market, folks.
    For the enterprise? I don't know about you guys, but I work at a huge company with about 6-8 different Windows-based security/login/monitoring/VPN apps that boot at startup. More for specific functions. We're still on XP - just like most corporations our size - precisely because of the legacy and security.

    There is zero chance of us replacing Windows for a custom Linux distro controlled by one hardware manufacturer. I can't imagine that is HP's ultimate goal.
  8. #148  
    Bingo!

    Even on the home front I can't imagine the frustration level of the average soccer mom when she can't install MS Office to make changes to the Excel sheet soccer schedule (that uses macros) like she used to be able to do on her old netbook.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    For the enterprise? I don't know about you guys, but I work at a huge company with about 6-8 different Windows-based security/login/monitoring/VPN apps that boot at startup. More for specific functions. We're still on XP - just like most corporations our size - precisely because of the legacy and security.

    There is zero chance of us replacing Windows for a custom Linux distro controlled by one hardware manufacturer. I can't imagine that is HP's ultimate goal.
    Sprint|Samsung Epic
  9. #149  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    Unless you count all of the other Operating Systems that are based on Linux.

    OSX, iOS, Android, WebOS, etc. Aren't they all based on Linux? That would put it #2 behind Windows, and at more than 50% in the smartphone market.
    OS X - Darwin with Custom UI, based off of the Mach Kernel from the Next Computer/Station and BSD

    IOS - A derivative of OS X

    Android - A heavily modified version of Linux, to the point where it no longer resembles Linux nor is it usable (basically a Linux Eunuch if you will)

    WebOS - True Linux with WebOS UI

    Moblin/Maemo/MeeGo - True Linux with QT UI

    As most marketshare figures only track sales, it's a bit tricky to estimate how large a market an OpenSource OS like Linux truly has. A closer figure might come from Web Usage figures:

    Usage share of operating systems - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    All told, Linux still trails heavily in overall usage, although if you break it down by server usage, it's still quite a force. (Written from my Gentoo Linux box )
    Palm III>Sony CLIÉ S300>Sony CLIÉ N760C>Sony CLIÉ TG50 & Tapwave Zodiac 2>Handspring Treo 600>Palm Treo 700p>Palm Treo 755p>Palm Pre>FrankenPre2
  10. #150  
    Take a tablet, take a detachable keyboard with a swivel attachment point...you have a netbook and a tablet all in one. Think beyond people. And who says they can't give you a way to edit and create Office documents on this? It doesn't HAVE to be MS Office as long as it has the features that 99% of users need, and it creates documents that MS Office natively handles.

    Netbooks took off with a certain core segment of users for a certain set of reasons. Those reasons, and desire, still exist. It's just that the first couple of rounds of netbooks did a poor job at fulfilling those needs without being painfully slow and unresponsive. Netbooks, especially ones where you can leave the keyboard behind and use the display as a full touchscreen interfaced tablet, could still sell as long as they aren't slow and unresponsive, and let people work with their documents.
  11. #151  
    As I stated in my post, think swivel. You could attach the keyboard to hold the display at the angle of your choice, like a laptop or netbook, then fold them together for easy carry. A keyboard that can't be attached is just one more thing you have to carry separately.

    I'm just throwing out iterations/possibilities. Don't be close minded.
  12. #152  
    A stand alone webOS netbook will never sell. Who would want a netbook that has less features than most smartphones? When you go full out netbook you go into the realm of Windows, Ubuntu, and other PC operating systems, and frankly no smartphone to date can do what a PC can. Though most people use their netbook for document editing and internet browsing netbooks can still do a lot more.

    As far as netbooks go; I think and Atrix webtop solution is feasible OR a desktop or browser based WebOS emulator/program. Where you can do the things webOS does and "seamlessly" sync with your dedicated WebOS devices.

    oh I also think the keyboard should have some type of way to dock to the tablet or display. I can only dread having two seperate items that i have to control both their angles seperately. Think typing on a train. I guess they could use the same solution that many of the Ipad cases have that make it look like a netbook.
  13. #153  
    Quote Originally Posted by hangman0000 View Post
    A stand alone webOS netbook will never sell. Who would want a netbook that has less features than most smartphones? When you go full out netbook you go into the realm of Windows, Ubuntu, and other PC operating systems, and frankly no smartphone to date can do what a PC can. Though most people use their netbook for document editing and internet browsing netbooks can still do a lot more.

    As far as netbooks go; I think and Atrix webtop solution is feasible OR a desktop or browser based WebOS emulator/program. Where you can do the things webOS does and "seamlessly" sync with your dedicated WebOS devices.

    oh I also think the keyboard should have some type of way to dock to the tablet or display. I can only dread having two seperate items that i have to control both their angles seperately. Think typing on a train. I guess they could use the same solution that many of the Ipad cases have that make it look like a netbook.
    Why? You are assuming that things are static. That apps like Quick Office will full editing and creation won't be there. You are seeing the apps as they are today, not what they could be after Feb 9. You also fail to see that webOS is fully capable of doing all the things netbooks are popular for now (internet, email, word processing, spreadsheet, little apps like a recipe database and similar stuff).

    If the device is compelling and does what consumers need and want it to do, why wouldn't it sell?
  14. #154  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    In this day and age of ubiquitous bluetooth, why would you need to physically attach a keyboard? Look at the leaked HP Palm tablet photos - they aren't going anywhere near an attachable form factor. I doubt there will be any room in the HP tablet lineup for attachable tablets unless you want them to look and feel like 1990's crap Tablet PCs.
    So it doesn't get lost.

    I don't mean this facetiously. I replaced desktop computers with laptops a long time ago. Part of that transition is that I have a separate keyboard, monitor, and mouse attached to a docking station. In many cases, two monitors. In short, in my configuration, the computer sits closed, much like a desktop computer.

    So why bother?

    Simple. I can hit a button, and take it with me. When I do that, I leave the dual montitors behind, I leave the fancy keyboard behind, and I leave the mouse behind (as well as the external disk storage), but I still carry with me everything I need to use the computer - keyboard, monitor, and a "mouse" (of sorts).

    I won't get to an airport, client site, hotel room; whatever, and suddenly discover that I left some part home that makes it unuseable.

    Yes, give me add-one components, but keep a "built in" system that works.
  15. #155  
    Quote Originally Posted by falconrap View Post
    As I stated in my post, think swivel. You could attach the keyboard to hold the display at the angle of your choice, like a laptop or netbook, then fold them together for easy carry. A keyboard that can't be attached is just one more thing you have to carry separately.

    I'm just throwing out iterations/possibilities. Don't be close minded.
    Shoot, I'd even "settle" for a BT keyboard that had a hinged frame that held the tablet/slate/whatever and turned it into a single device.
  16. #156  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    For the enterprise? I don't know about you guys, but I work at a huge company with about 6-8 different Windows-based security/login/monitoring/VPN apps that boot at startup. More for specific functions. We're still on XP - just like most corporations our size - precisely because of the legacy and security.

    There is zero chance of us replacing Windows for a custom Linux distro controlled by one hardware manufacturer. I can't imagine that is HP's ultimate goal.
    Enterprise? I have no idea why you're bringing large corporation enterprise stuff up. I'm talking about retail consumers who will gladly give up Windows because they don't care about Windows. If you can get the applications to run on a device, be easy to use and look pretty, people don't care. If you can save people $50 or $100 or $300 vs. Windows, all the better. With applications like Wine out there and Cloud based services, there is no reason why webOS could not completely replace Windows as a mainstream operating system.

    Regarding enterprise users, Windows XP is just about at the end of it's cycle. Businesses are pushing hard to consolidate their operating systems and services for more efficiency. Desktop PCs as workstations will be a thing of the past within 10 years, and the migration to Cloud terminals will be on the fast rise within the next 5 years.
  17. #157  
    Quote Originally Posted by EvilKell View Post
    Enterprise? I have no idea why you're bringing large corporation enterprise stuff up. I'm talking about retail consumers who will gladly give up Windows because they don't care about Windows. If you can get the applications to run on a device, be easy to use and look pretty, people don't care. If you can save people $50 or $100 or $300 vs. Windows, all the better. With applications like Wine out there and Cloud based services, there is no reason why webOS could not completely replace Windows as a mainstream operating system.
    I think Ubuntu and Jolicloud have the same attributes and are free AND can be installed to dual boot or outright replace any Windows laptop out there now, no additional purchase needed. But I guess HP will have some magical spice to make this gain mass appeal where countless others have failed.

    Regarding enterprise users, Windows XP is just about at the end of it's cycle. Businesses are pushing hard to consolidate their operating systems and services for more efficiency. Desktop PCs as workstations will be a thing of the past within 10 years, and the migration to Cloud terminals will be on the fast rise within the next 5 years.
    True enough, most people in our corporation work off laptops and most of our work is done "in the cloud". I use relatively few local files on my machine, and those are just graphics elements and PDFs that need to be uploaded to our website and whatnot.

    But this is all Windows stuff hosted on Microsoft Sharepoint and other proprietary Windows-based solutions. At no point in the next 5-10 years will this company and many other large ones I freelance contract for consider throwing all of that away to shift to Linux cloud terminals, and most certainly not WebOS ones.

    Aint. Gonna. Happen.
  18. #158  
    Yeah, ever used Ubuntu or Fedora or Open SUSE or gos? I've installed them all, and none of them were user friendly. Try getting a wireless PCI card on a desktop PC to work with Linux. All you have to do is get ndiswrapper going and manually obtain drivers, etc. Package managers, special application installation procedures to enable basic functionality... Linux has been a very geek driven OS. The open source developers are geeks and nerds, and quite frankly, a lot of them LIKE Linux to be difficult to use and quirky. Android started off as a very geek OS. It was clumsy, awkward, laggy, buggy, ugly, and lacked a lot of functionality. It was like Linux. Very capable, but in base form, far from easy. Android has come along ways, maintaining it's "geek" factor with customization, but moving to satisfy mainstream users which is something no distro of Linux has ever done.

    Of course servers and other systems will be the last to swap. I was working for Prudential in 2001... still on 16 Mbit/s Token Ring and running (I'm not joking) at least one Pentium Pro based server. Hilariously enough, the server was replaced with a twilighted Pentium III box running Windows NT that was tossed into a janitors closet. When the system went down, you had to go in there and reboot the "server"
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    #159  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    netbooks are NOT dying ... LOL... just bc a few techies or yuppies have one , doesnt mean the avg joe wants an iPad over a netbook
    Umm, have you seen iPad sales recently? They're at 14.8 million since it launched.
  20. #160  
    Yes, I would love to have a webOS netbook.
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