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  1. #81  
    webOS is best as a mobile OS. Managing cards with your thumb, flicking them left, right, and up. Works great for on a phone. Also should great for a tablet (since you have to hold it with one hand and navigate with the other). I just don't see how that brings anything beneficial to a netbook. Even on a 11" screen, I want to be able to look at multiple windows simultaneously or arrange windows however I want. That is ruined by the card metaphor, or atleast as it exists today.

    A trackpad (or mouse), keyboard, AND touchscreen? I only got two hands. Anything that poses to be netbooks has to allow a trackpad or mouse input. Imagine trying to point to your touchscreen and hold down a button on the keyboard. Definately different than anything we've used before. I use to think Google was crazy for working on Android AND Chrome. But, thinking about it, I don't think you can make one OS work for mobile AND netbook. Hopefully HP realizes this.

    webOS is currently is horrible for document editing (combination of keypresses and screen taps to select and accurately move the cursor). With a tablet and perhaps a slab phone coming, hopefully they've reworked it to do without the keypresses. Even on a slider I would like the option to be able to select and accurately move the cursor without having to slide the keyboard out.
  2. #82  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mordbane View Post
    webOS is best as a mobile OS. Managing cards with your thumb, flicking them left, right, and up. Works great for on a phone. Also should great for a tablet (since you have to hold it with one hand and navigate with the other). I just don't see how that brings anything beneficial to a netbook. Even on a 11" screen, I want to be able to look at multiple windows simultaneously or arrange windows however I want. That is ruined by the card metaphor, or atleast as it exists today.
    Have you seen the stack metaphor? Think what they could do if they expanded on that idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mordbane View Post
    A trackpad (or mouse), keyboard, AND touchscreen? I only got two hands...
    So do I, and I use both of them to type (on my computer). But, my computer still has a mouse. Actually, my computer still has a mouse and a touchpad (since I use a laptop in a docking station). I use the keyboard when I need the keyboard, and a mouse when I need it. I suspect a touchscreen enabled computer would be much the same.

    Actually, they've been around for a while, and worked OK. The difference is, they worked on an OS that wasn't really built with a touchscreen in mind.
  3. #83  
    Quote Originally Posted by dandbj13 View Post
    I respectfully disagree. A pad is an inherently touch driven device. You cannot drive an iPad with a keyboard and mouse. You can use a keyboard to type. Besides a few task specific keys, that's about it. A netbook needs an OS that is driven by keyboard and pointer input. The difference is not just in the hardware. wOS would have to be rewritten to make sense on a netbook in the same way that Windows does. You can slap in on a netbook, but it would be a poor experience.
    A netbook doesn't need pointer input if it has a touch screen. A very popular accessory for the iPad is a case with a bluetooth keyboard that basically turns it into a netbook.
  4. #84  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mattykinsx View Post
    3) That is not even accurate. It's only in the past few months that Android has expanded outside of just phones.
    Android 1.5 tablets have been around since early 2010. Earlier if you count something like the Archos 5 as a tablet.
  5. #85  
    Quote Originally Posted by falconrap View Post
    Netbooks only appear to be dying because the current breed are painfully slow in comparison to a real laptop.
    It doesn't help that the offerings by many of the manufacturers haven't changed much in the last year. I got my son a Del 1012 laptop for his birthday early last year. Other than Win 7 starter is slow, I like the hardware and wouldn't mind getting myself one and put linux on it. I would have thought the hardware would have been updated or at least gotten cheaper in the year that it's been out, but it hasn't. It is as if 1.6GHz, 1G ram, 250G HD, and 1366x768 (many are still 1024x600) spec is the high water mark for those machines.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vyruz Reaper View Post
    More important than a webOS netbook would be a webOS app than runs on window and macOSX (ex. a .exe and .dmg program) So that we can sync spefici music, files with ALL DEVICES, ex. like a dropbox app
    You mean like ZumoDrive?

    To answer the original question, I'd buy a webOS netbook if one were available. If a tablet is only offered, I'd probably get a case w/ a bluetooth keyboard to turn it into a DIY netbook. I hate on screen keyboards.
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    #86  
    Unless the netbook could do enterprise tasks... Remote login via RDP,VNC,and ssh and self-hosting development of WebOS applications then it would be pretty much the same as a tablet. Cloud services have drawbacks. There is the cost for each cloud provider's monthly service. Enterprises won't want to deal with advertisement subsidized applications, so they will end up paying a per-device/per-month charge for office productivity suites, etc. But the biggest drawback is data security. No enterprise wants it's data held by someone else, they also want the local data encrypted and locked in case of theft. Since the cloud services are tied to the device a loss of one of these could mean big security problems.

    Bottom line is that HP has said that they were going to become focused on commercial enterprises but a netbook sure doesn't seem to be the right device for that focus.
  7. #87  
    Quote Originally Posted by ggendel View Post
    Bottom line is that HP has said that they were going to become focused on commercial enterprises but a netbook sure doesn't seem to be the right device for that focus.
    I thought their webOS line was going to focus on the consumer end. A netbook doesn't seem to be the right choice for that focus either.
  8. #88  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    I thought their webOS line was going to focus on the consumer end. A netbook doesn't seem to be the right choice for that focus either.
    When I see this: 12-2010 : A day in the life with webOS 2.0

    I'm thinking they're going on a commercial/enterprise focus with some crossover for the busy business consumer. There's almost no mention of general consumer appeal here, and this is their marketing focus for WebOS 2.0.
  9. #89  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    When I see this: 12-2010 : A day in the life with webOS 2.0

    I'm thinking they're going on a commercial/enterprise focus with some crossover for the busy business consumer. There's almost no mention of general consumer appeal here, and this is their marketing focus for WebOS 2.0.
    It's interesting, being that HP has a strong business market.

    But I think they're going to do some consumer actions too.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
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  10. #90  
    Quote Originally Posted by deCorvett View Post
    It's interesting, being that HP has a strong business market.

    But I think they're going to do some consumer actions too.

    -- Sent from my Palm Pre using Forums
    Well, you can't launch a platform while serving two masters. And I can't think of a smartphone platform in recent memory (i.e. post-Blackberry) that has launched successfully with a business focus. HP needs to clean that messaging up, and I suspect they will to some extent around Feb. 9.

    I hope so, at least.
  11. #91  
    HP is still the biggest dog in consumer sales of printers, computers, and even in digital cameras.

    They understand that all business users are also consumers, even though some consumers are not business people. They could be students, homemakers, etc.

    HP can't ignore the consumer markets at a key entry point for enterprise markets. Apple has depended on that strategy from the beginning.
  12. #92  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    HP is still the biggest dog in consumer sales of printers, computers, and even in digital cameras.

    They understand that all business users are also consumers, even though some consumers are not business people. They could be students, homemakers, etc.

    HP can't ignore the consumer markets at a key entry point for enterprise markets. Apple has depended on that strategy from the beginning.
    I don't think HP would ignore consumer markets, per se. However, their biggest differentiator/asset in the aforementioned categories is low price and availability. It's not like HP printers are widely known as being a cut above Epson or Canon. We have a HP Deskjet 6540 because it was onsale and had a decent feature set at the time. We could buy an upgraded Deskjet wireless All-in-One for the cost of replacing both toner cartridges, but we just haven't bothered. Similarly, my HP netbook was on sale on Craigslist and had a decent enough feature set. I didn't go looking for their laptops.

    But in the smartphone world, this isn't the case. They can't be available at more locations than Android/Apple. They definitely can't undercut them on price, and for the foreseeable future, they can't match them on features. So they're going to have to create a compelling consumer message. I haven't seen that at all yet, and their focus thus far with 2.0 has been anything but.

    I would LIKE them to pull a 180 on Feb. 9, but I haven't seen any evidence to indicate that will be the case.
  13. #93  
    Netbooks, to me, link to productivity and creation. Tablets relate to consumption. I don't know how difficult it would be to create an Open Office engine that would work with Netbooks, but if they could place Open Office onto webOS (like most Linux applications), I don't see any reason why the webOS netbook wouldn't be a success in its own niche market. Especially with Cloud services.

    Without a decent tool to work with office documents and spreadsheets, a webOS netbook won't sell.
  14. #94  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikah912 View Post
    Well, you can't launch a platform while serving two masters. And I can't think of a smartphone platform in recent memory (i.e. post-Blackberry) that has launched successfully with a business focus. HP needs to clean that messaging up, and I suspect they will to some extent around Feb. 9.

    I hope so, at least.
    Yep, no way could HP serve the enterprise and the consumer. I mean if they tried that with printers, they'd ... oh ... wait ... never mind.
  15. #95  
    Admittedly, I am not familiar with the "printers" platform or any of the apps that run on it....
  16. #96  
    Quote Originally Posted by Veyron431 View Post
    I personally think something like a macbook air with a screen that flips over like a traditional tablet that dual-booted windows and webos would be really cool. With battery life to rival an iPad and a ssd to rival a larger computer speed wise, but just make it look like a Dell adamo, and have 13 and 11 inch versions (I don't think my iPad is big or fast enough). Pricing wise I think that anything under $2000 for the 13 inch version and 1500 for the 11 inch version with perhaps cheaper versions available would be reasonable.


    Before rahul sood left HP I was really hoping for something like this with voodoo DNA just an all out assault on design and hardware that sets the tone as there top-of-the line product. of course, with more wallet friendly devices in the lineup as well.
    There are four lights.
  17. cgk
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    #97  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Yep, no way could HP serve the enterprise and the consumer. I mean if they tried that with printers, they'd ... oh ... wait ... never mind.

    Is that a single platform? Like Mikah I don't know an awful lot about printers but I thought that the enterprise offerings were different to the consumer offerings?
  18. #98  
    Significant product/feature overlap, and all running the same "OS". Difference is in the really high-end stuff not sold at Best Buy, and the really low end stuff not sold by integrators.

    And many customers like me buy a high-end network printer for home even if I have to work harder to find someplace to buy it. I have a networked color laser at home that is beefier than most you'd find in huge company offices. It has a 45,000 page monthly duty cycle.

    So did I buy that as a consumer or a business user? That's a trick question.
  19. #99  
    I donít understand this tangent at all. I clearly said "smartphone platform" in the post that kicked this off. Printers are not a smartphone platform, are not operated like smartphones, are not sold like smartphones, and the most popular manufacturers in each field have almost nothing to do with their counterparts in the other.
  20. cgk
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    #100  
    I'm a bit confused about it as well?

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