Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 88
  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by jetsetter883 View Post
    snip...They are going to want them because they saw an ad on TV showing off how cool and intuitive the OS is.
    How is wOS intuitive? This term gets bandied about, both on iPhone forums and here, but at best it's subjective.

    Quote Originally Posted by JLegacy View Post
    The Pre line has pretty much had iPhone competitive hardware up till the Pre 2, which lacks the screen the iPhone 4 has. ...snip
    How is the above true?
    Last edited by sinsin07; 12/29/2010 at 07:02 AM.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by astraith View Post
    The biggest thing -- and I think this is what said poster in this forum is pointing towards -- is the lack of hardware features, such as a compass, to allow for features like Argumentative Reality. But that is something that can also be fixed next year.
    Augmented

    ...but I'm not trying to be argumentative.
  3. #23  
    Serious... if have to be some news to impress your client, do you HAVE to put IN FRONT!

    Why?

    Because the first impressions are that REALLY stay!

    Example? Samsung Galaxy S!! The bigger screen with the superamoled, is EXCELENT to gain new clients.

    A high resolution with a superamoled screen with adds investiment is enogh to make the Palm PrPrPr $2$ $a$ $best$ $seller$!! $When$ $the$ $customer$ $come$, $see$ $a$ $fantastic$ $and$ $beautifull$ $screen$, $and$ $is$ $50$% $decided$ $to$ $buy$.

    Believe me, this is more important than screen size...


    Best Regards...
    "If A Man Isn't Willing To Take Some Risk For His Opinions, Either His Opinions Are No Good Or He's No Good!" - Ezra Pound (Poet & Critic)
    (Happy A Lot, As A Good Carioca!)
  4. JLegacy's Avatar
    Posts
    320 Posts
    Global Posts
    323 Global Posts
    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by sinsin07 View Post
    How is wOS intuitive? This term gets bandied about, both on iPhone forums and here, but at best it's subjective.


    How is the above true?
    webOS is intuitive with ease-of-use (kinda like iOS), but also with unique things like gestures, a good notification system, and cards. iOS might be generally easier to use, but I've seen people struggle to get the app store working, or get frustrated with how iOS isn't the same answer mechanism with answering a call during a call, or that they are missing a back button.

    iPhone 3GS and Palm Pre both:
    -had the same screen resolution (Though the Pre's screen looked nicer with pixel density and all)
    -have competitive processors running 600MHz, but can be capable of 1GHz
    -256MB of RAM (512MB with Pre+ and Pre 2, competing with the iPhone 4)
    -8GB storage (16GB pre plus works fine for me, but I'm still hoping for a future 32GB model)
    -3 MP camera (Though I wish the Pre's camera has the features the iPhone's camera has)
    They even weigh the same.
    The way I first heard of the Pre was that is was going to be an "iPhone killer", and I believe this to be true. A bunch of things went wrong with making it a market success, but you can't say it wasn't intended to compete with the iPhone.
    Peace, Freedom, Prosperity.

    If you have a complaint/request relating to webOS please use the Feedback & Feature Requests Form at the official site.
  5. #25  
    I have been very pessimistic lately. I'm trying to avoid being disappointed at CES.
    -Until Skynet takes over.
  6. #26  
    Basing an opinion of what HP Palm has in store on their casting call for a particular commercial is a little myopic. Of course, such a standard may fit that particular person's pre-conceived view (no pun intended), but it's hardly indicitive of what's to come.

    I'm much more impressed with Palm's advertising for a Sr. Manager - Information Management Security and Compliance position. Take a look at the job description. Note the number of years experience they want. All of this indicates that HP is pretty serious about where they plan on going.

    Reading between the lines, it further buttresses my believe that they are going to go big time into cloud computing. It also makes it pretty clear, they are not aming solely at the "teen market".
  7. #27  
    I'll also say, the listings on LinkedIn appear to support the idea that they're aiming for the enterprise market, and that they plan on extensive in-house develpment:

    • Sr. Manager - Information Management Security and Compliance HP-Palm
    • Product Line Manager-Mobile Products HP/Palm
    • Sr. Software Engineer - Email Sync HP - Palm
    • Sr. Business Analyst – Information Technology HP-Palm Global Business Unit
    • Marketing Manager - Developer Communications HP/Palm
    • Sr. Software Engineer - Mobil Applications HP - Palm
    • Sr. JavaScript Software Applications Developer HP - Palm


    In short, I see a lot of good news there.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Reading between the lines, it further buttresses my believe that they are going to go big time into cloud computing. It also makes it pretty clear, they are not aming solely at the "teen market".
    What's not as clear is whether this cloud and security push is solely for pPads or if it is targeted at phones too. HP, though its actions and comments, has indicated they're much more interested in the tablet business than they are in the hone business. Whatever they're building should probably support both phones and pads, but phone community security needs are already well-established in the marketplace.
  9. WhoMe's Avatar
    Posts
    128 Posts
    Global Posts
    476 Global Posts
    #29  
    I just want something with a big screen, WebOS, and enough cpu and memory to make the phone operate quickly and smoothly. NO HICCUPS!

    Gimme gestures, cards, and a screen that large and sharp....pleeeease!
  10. #30  
    Check Engadget.
  11. #31  
    I have to say, i agree with most of you. I had the Pre for over a year, and just recently caved in on Christmas Eve and bought the Evo with my Sprint upgrade. I'm completely smitten with the Evo.

    Certain things i love off the bat are the Friends Stream feature, the widgets (something the orginal Palm phones incorporated through 3rd party apps) and the wonderfully large and vibrant screen.

    I dont see myself going back to Palm unless the allow widgets now. They are extremly convenient and productive. Plus i actually enjoy typing on the touch screen keyboard, something i would have denied wanting 6 months ago. I wont go back to a physical keyboard again.

    Palm/HP needs to do more than come out with a superphone. They need better features! The desparately need better features. I think the addition of widgets are a must, but i think the reason they dont allow them now is because of the horrible way the Pre handles memory management, something evidenced by a person running a stock Pre with no overclock.

    I will entertain a tablet device depending on what would be bundled with it. But a tablet device without 'wow' features will just add to the jokes id be teased with from my friends...."is that your MaxiPad that you use to play with your Pixi"...... you know what i mean. You have those friends too.
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    What's not as clear is whether this cloud and security push is solely for pPads or if it is targeted at phones too. HP, though its actions and comments, has indicated they're much more interested in the tablet business than they are in the hone business. Whatever they're building should probably support both phones and pads, but phone community security needs are already well-established in the marketplace.
    Two of the listings make me believe they are still looking strongly at phones:
    • Product Line Manager-Mobile Products HP/Palm
    • Sr. Software Engineer - Mobil Applications HP - Palm


    In addition, there was this in the posting for the Sr. Manager position:
    Understanding of a broad array of computer platforms and technologies including, but not limited to: UNIX, Windows, web/ecommerce applications, LDAP, PDAs and smartphones, DBMSs, firewalls, anti-virus, VPNs, intrusion detection and prevention systems, remote access and proxy servers
    (My emphasis added).
    Looking at everything they posted, there's no doubt that they're getting serious, and that they are looking at tablets. I still see lots of hope for phones though.

    Assuming they do continue phones, and further assuming that they plan on marketing tablets to the enterprise, that would clearly indicate they plan a lot more than "teen phones" as inferred (by some) from the casting call for a commercial.
  13. #33  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    ...but phone community security needs are already well-established in the marketplace.
    Sorry, I missed this part in my previous response.

    I couldn't disagree more. Phone security is somewhat established with RIM, but not very well by anyone else. Further, RIM has completely missed the boat with merging phone security with end user needs and desires. I can't count the number of times I've seen users carry their corporate issued BB in addition to their personal phone. Not because they're not permitted to use their issued phone for personal use, but because it's too locked down for them to use it they way they'd like.

    BB is losing market share, but it's the most secure (popular) phone in the industry. Melding the needs of the end user with the IT/Security staff at corporate would go a long way towards re-establishing Palm in the entrprise. I don't think HP is missing that fact.
  14. #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by WhoMe View Post
    I just want something with a big screen, WebOS, and enough cpu and memory to make the phone operate quickly and smoothly. NO HICCUPS!

    Gimme gestures, cards, and a screen that large and sharp....pleeeease!
    this is what the people want...give it to them!
  15. #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    Because the Pre was killed by high-end competition and rapidly became a mid-range smartphone which only sold at significant discounts. Because Palm has lost any cache it had as a high-end brand. Because a high-end smartphone in 2011 is much higher bar than existed in 2009.
    Every high-end phone becomes a mid-range phone within the 6-12 month time frame. Just depends on the competition. The Pre was simply followed by a plethora of Android super phones during the next 12 months. Of course, for a brief time, Palm easily exceeded the user base of Android. It's a lesson in what can be done. The market, with the exception of Apple, has limited loyalty in the smartphone market. BB was getting there, but consumers, like me, realized how limiting the experience was and moved on. BB is only hanging in now due to the business side of their market. Palm, with HP's backing and scale, has a unique opportunity this coming year. They can penetrate the BB and negative end of the Android market (what I mean is people who have Android and don't like it - something like a third or more last survey I saw). They can also be the phone that's easier for feature phone users to migrate to when they decide they need a more capable phone.

    What Palm/HP need to do is make several more form factors, covering the spectrum of user wants, then advertise the out if them and the OS. Use a combination of add styles to hit the core markets and drive the message home. Give carrier sales folks big incentives to sell these phones (i.e. pay them off like Google does). One thing I have seen is that webOS can develop brand loyalty close to what Apple can. Most people who truly learn to use it, love it, and don't want to go elsewhere. Put these phones on every carrier around the world that they can get on. Finish the API's. Pay the big developers to bring some core apps over. And keep the fresh hardware coming. Do these things, and Palm/HP can easily become the number 3 player in the market. Maybe even number 2 if they keep it up for a couple of years. If they do those things in 2011, then they could easily exit the year with 15-20 million users. Palm managed roughly 2.5 million with meager advertising and limited carrier buy-in for only 2 form factor phones.
  16. StevenX's Avatar
    Posts
    457 Posts
    Global Posts
    492 Global Posts
    #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by falconrap View Post
    BB is only hanging in now due to the business side of their market.
    This really isn't true, at least in the UK. BB is extremely popular here; I think people think it has some sort of status attached and buy them without really knowing what exactly they can/can't do, and likewise what the competition can/can't do. I know a LOT of people who have bought a BB just because it's a BB. In London particularly, the vast majority of people have an iPhone. The vast majority of those who don't have an iPhone have a BB.
  17. #37  
    Quote Originally Posted by WhoMe View Post
    I just want something with a big screen, WebOS, and enough cpu and memory to make the phone operate quickly and smoothly. NO HICCUPS!

    Gimme gestures, cards, and a screen that large and sharp....pleeeease!
    In a week or so, everyone will be announcing the latest in fast, big screen devices for their brand and OS of choice. Simply reaching parity there won't mean much, which is why no one advertises these things unless they have the "best" (e.g. Retina Display, Super AMOLED). Since HP likely won't have the "best" in any of these specs - or even if they do, it'll be a short-lived reign - they will hopefully focus on the "best" that they actually have - which is hopefully WebOS 2.5.

    And this time....no frickin' press release, please.
  18. #38  
    Quote Originally Posted by JLegacy View Post
    webOS is intuitive with ease-of-use (kinda like iOS), but also with unique things like gestures, a good notification system, and cards. iOS might be generally easier to use, but I've seen people struggle to get the app store working, or get frustrated with how iOS isn't the same answer mechanism with answering a call during a call, or that they are missing a back button.

    iPhone 3GS and Palm Pre both:
    -had the same screen resolution (Though the Pre's screen looked nicer with pixel density and all)
    -have competitive processors running 600MHz, but can be capable of 1GHz
    -256MB of RAM (512MB with Pre+ and Pre 2, competing with the iPhone 4)
    -8GB storage (16GB pre plus works fine for me, but I'm still hoping for a future 32GB model)
    -3 MP camera (Though I wish the Pre's camera has the features the iPhone's camera has)
    They even weigh the same.
    The way I first heard of the Pre was that is was going to be an "iPhone killer", and I believe this to be true. A bunch of things went wrong with making it a market success, but you can't say it wasn't intended to compete with the iPhone.
    Thanks for your answer. One thing though, gestures are not intuitive, just a feature. In order to be intuitive, it would have to be an instinctive action. A new user having never heard of wOS may not intuitively start making swiping gestures to move around.

    Your ease of use argument is a subjective opinion. Your other points are what is called a learning curve, all things new to people have a learning curve, including the wOS phones. Since there are a hell of alot of iphones being sold, I would imagine people get it.

    The specs you presented are comparable, but I am not sure what pre phone is being comapred to what model iphone.

    In regard to competing with the iPhone, you make the same mistake Palm did. The iPhone is not a standalone device.
  19. #39  
    Quote Originally Posted by falconrap View Post
    Every high-end phone becomes a mid-range phone within the 6-12 month time frame. Just depends on the competition.
    The thing is, the Pre never succeeded as a high end phone amid ANY competition. It sold best on Sprint when there was none. When the Hero appeared, Sprint finally had a viable platform, doubled down with the Evo and never looked back. On Verizon, it took price cuts, BOGO, AND a free hotspot just to clear out inventory to manageable levels. They never did sell all of the Pre Pluses made for Verizon and just EOLed it. On AT&T, it never even reached the heights of the Bold and the Samsung Captivate, much less the iPhone 4.

    The competition was never as much of a problem as their bad decisions were.

    The Pre was simply followed by a plethora of Android super phones during the next 12 months. Of course, for a brief time, Palm easily exceeded the user base of Android. It's....
    When was this? Android had a user base of a couple million when WebOS launched on day one. Before Palm got to a sellthrough of 1.5 million, Android had the Hero and the Droid racking up sales here in the US, adding millions more. At NO point was WebOS bigger.

    Palm, with HP's backing and scale, has a unique opportunity this coming year. They can penetrate the BB and negative end of the Android market (what I mean is people who have Android and don't like it - something like a third or more last survey I saw). They can also be the phone that's easier for feature phone users to migrate to when they decide they need a more capable phone.
    Doesn't EVERY platform - Android and BB included - have designs on this same set of users? The same opportunity exists for everyone in enterprise growth, new users, etc. But the other platforms are moving on those opportunities and locking down space NOW. HP Palm is still quiet and dead in the water.

    What Palm/HP need to do is make several more form factors, covering the spectrum of user wants, then advertise the out if them and the OS.
    The thing is...the market leaders are succeeding with pretty much ONE form factor (e.g. Blackberry, iPhone). Even the Android is just a huge screen slab with option of a slideout keyboard or not. Same for Windows Phone 7. This spectrum is not as huge or advantageous as some here make it out to be.

    Use a combination of add styles to hit the core markets and drive the message home. Give carrier sales folks big incentives to sell these phones (i.e. pay them off like Google does). One thing I have seen is that webOS can develop brand loyalty close to what Apple can. Most people who truly learn to use it, love it, and don't want to go elsewhere. Put these phones on every carrier around the world that they can get on. Finish the API's. Pay the big developers to bring some core apps over. And keep the fresh hardware coming. Do these things, and Palm/HP can easily become the number 3 player in the market. Maybe even number 2 if they keep it up for a couple of years. If they do those things in 2011, then they could easily exit the year with 15-20 million users. Palm managed roughly 2.5 million with meager advertising and limited carrier buy-in for only 2 form factor phones.
    Possibilities? Sure. That they are.
  20. #40  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Sorry, I missed this part in my previous response.

    I couldn't disagree more. Phone security is somewhat established with RIM, but not very well by anyone else. Further, RIM has completely missed the boat with merging phone security with end user needs and desires. I can't count the number of times I've seen users carry their corporate issued BB in addition to their personal phone. Not because they're not permitted to use their issued phone for personal use, but because it's too locked down for them to use it they way they'd like.

    BB is losing market share, but it's the most secure (popular) phone in the industry. Melding the needs of the end user with the IT/Security staff at corporate would go a long way towards re-establishing Palm in the entrprise. I don't think HP is missing that fact.
    When you say the BB is locked down, who locks it down RIM or the Corp the BB belongs to?
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions