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  1.    #1  
    interesting read, about the 6 companies HP aquired in 2010, and how it intends on using this to compete in the smartphone, and tablet world.

    HP, the dark horse of 2010By Sharon Lobo, Dec 16, 2010 04:20 PM
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    The year 2010 will go down in history as the year that saw numerous acquisitions in the technology space. Managing to break the shackles of recession, major IT firms in the US came out in full force acquiring companies in a bid to make up for their lost momentum. In this mad rush of buying out companies, one of the top 5 PC manufactures – HP (NYSE:HPQ), who managed to lap up 6 firms this year, has had an eventful year, which included the shocking acquisition of Palm and the protracted tussle with Dell (NASDAQELL) for 3PAR (NYSE:PAR).

    Let’s take a look at the stories behind HP’s acquisitions in 2010.

    Palm Inc. (Acquired in April 2010)
    HP inaugurated its buying spree this year, when it acquired ailing smartphone maker-Palm for $1.2 billion. This acquisition took everyone by surprise as HP who itself had failed to gain a foothold in the mobile space with its iPAQ range of handsets was now planning to revive Palm’s fortunes. However, HP claimed that rather than Palm, it was the Palm webOS that it was more interested in as it would give them a competitive edge in the ever growing smart device space. Though we are still to see this dream turn to reality, there have been rumors that HP will launch a webOS-based tablet in Q1 of next year. Only till such time we can just hope HP actually succeeds resurrecting Palm to its former glory.

    Melodeo (Acquired in June 2010)
    After Palm, it was Seattle-based Melodeo’s turn to join the HP clan. The primary motive behind this acquisition seemed to be HP’s attempt to take on Apple’s iTunes as Melodeo’s flagship product nuTsie competes with iTunes by enabling users to shop, download, and listen to music on their mobile phones.

    Combined with Palm’s acquisition a couple of months earlier, HP can now build a complete ecosystem comprising of hardware, platform, and application store, much like competitors RIM, Nokia, and Apple. All this points to the fact that HP is seriously planning to position itself as a strong competitor in the mobile space.

    Fortify Software (Acquired in August 2010)
    After a acquiring two companies, which were not in line to its core business, HP turned its attention to Fortify Software, a California-based software vendor whose products protect businesses from the threats posed by security flaws in software applications. With the acquisition of Fortify, HP expects to offer a complete solution to help organizations reduce business risk, meet compliance regulations and protect against malicious application attacks.

    Stratavia (Acquired in August 2010)
    Within a span of few days of acquiring Fortify, HP struck again by acquiring Denver-based Stratavia for an undisclosed sum. Stratavia specializes in stack automation for physical, virtual, and cloud infrastructure. According to HP, these solutions will help its customers simplify application deployment and management in hybrid IT environments, which consist of on-premise, off-premise, physical and virtual environments.

    3PAR (Acquired in September 2010)
    The mother of all acquisitions this year was that of 3PAR by HP. This acquisition was all over the news considering the bidding and counter-bidding efforts between HP and Dell. It all started when Dell announced that it would acquire 3PAR for $1.5 billion and HP jumped in to the fray with its $1.6 billion counter-bid. Following HP’s offer, Dell raised its bid to $1.6 billion, which HP countered with its $1.8 billion offer. However, within hours of Dell managing to match this price, HP increased its offer to $ 2 billion. This time instead of only matching HP’s bid, Dell actually upped its bid to $ 2.1 billion. But, once again HP, with its too strong to resist bid of $ 2.35 billion managed to grab 3PAR. The final amount paid by HP was 10 times more than 3PAR’s revenue for 2009.

    3PAR’s acquisition caused many to comment that HP had overbid for a company that had not made any profits since it went public back in 2007. If you too feel what made HP shell out this huge amount, the simple answer is cloud computing. With cloud computing gaining prominence by the day, HP did not want lose its share of pie in this space. As a provider of utility storage for both public as well as private cloud, 3PAR is important for HP as it gives the latter a competitive edge in the cloud storage space. By buying 3PAR, HP can now combine 3PAR’s virtualized storage solutions with its own, thereby offering an unparalleled storage, server, and networking portfolio.

    ArcSight (Acquired in September 2010)
    Post its acquisition of Fortify, HP felt that it further needed to strengthen its security offerings, especially in the cloud, and as a result spent $1.5 billion to buy ArcSight, an enterprise security management provider. HP believes that the combination of ArcSight’s security products and its own will provide businesses the ability to proactively monitor real-time events, assess risks and respond quickly to threats.

    HP’s six acquisitions this year shows that the firm is determined be a strong player in the growing mobile and cloud space. While there are already established players in these segments, it will be interesting to see how HP manages to take on Android, Apple and RIM on the mobile front and CA and EMC in the cloud space.

    HP, the dark horse of 2010 - CXOtoday.com
  2. DSPKweb's Avatar
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    #2  
    Here's to 2011 and hoping they put everything together and become a juggernaut in the industry, cranking out great pieces of technology every couple of months and redefining what the market should be.
    Sanyo SCP 4500 > Samsung SCH 1900 > Sanyo SCP 5000 > Treo 755p > Palm Pre > HTC Evo
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by DSPKweb View Post
    Here's to 2011 and hoping they put everything together and become a juggernaut in the industry, cranking out great pieces of technology every couple of months and redefining what the market should be.
    well said
  4. Barebuns's Avatar
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    #4  
    In my continuous prodding to bring encryption to webOS, I guess I've overlooked HP's acquisition of Fortify, Stratavia, and ArcSight. This fills me with hope that we'll be secure enough to gain access to the more restricted Exchange servers, in the coming months. Impatience leaves me depressed that we have to wait for the coming months. . .
  5. #5  
    Looks Like HP Has Big Plans. I Dont Think They Would Spend All That Money For Nothing. And They Have Been So Quiet. Even During Interviews, They Refuse To Answer Questions And Just Give Us A Smirk. They Are Up Something And I Hope Its Big!


    My Pre Does EXACTLY What I Need It To Do, And Thats Why I Have A webOS Relationship.

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  6. #6  
    Don't do that PJaE00! All those capitalized words, they make me sound like I'm stuttering as I read them.
    Down with the BourgeoisOS oppressors, webOS users unite!
  7. #7  
    Ya the world is going to be sweet before it ends! Sweet tux Zen. It looks like HP is heading in the right direction, but only time will tell.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen00 View Post
    Don't do that PJaE00! All those capitalized words, they make me sound like I'm stuttering as I read them.
    Force Of Habit. You're Not The First To Say Something About My Typing, And Def. Wont Be The Last


    My Pre Does EXACTLY What I Need It To Do, And Thats Why I Have A webOS Relationship.

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  9. JLegacy's Avatar
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    #9  
    Let's hope 2011 won't be disapointing.
    Peace, Freedom, Prosperity.

    If you have a complaint/request relating to webOS please use the Feedback & Feature Requests Form at the official site.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Barebuns View Post
    In my continuous prodding to bring encryption to webOS, I guess I've overlooked HP's acquisition of Fortify, Stratavia, and ArcSight. This fills me with hope that we'll be secure enough to gain access to the more restricted Exchange servers, in the coming months. Impatience leaves me depressed that we have to wait for the coming months. . .
    Anyone with strong insight into where current IT trends ar headed should thrilled with the summary above.

    HP leads off by buying a smartphone that was designed from the ground up to be cloud based.

    They buy a could based music system.

    They buy a couple software protection companies.

    Then they buy a cloud infrastructre company.

    Anyone that can't see that (arguably) the largest computer company in the world is preparing for a major ecosystem is simply choosing not to see.
    Last edited by hparsons; 12/18/2010 at 10:28 AM. Reason: Corrected "cloud"
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Anyone with strong insight into where current IT trends ar headed should thrilled with the summary above.

    HP leads off by buying a smartphone that was designed from the ground up to be cloud based.

    They buy a could based music system.

    They buy a couple software protection companies.

    Then they buy a could infrastructre company.

    Anyone that can't see that (arguably) the largest computer company in the world is preparing for a major ecosystem is simply choosing not to see.
    I agree. I know many who complain and seem impatient will over-look the above as HP appears primmed to BLOW the doors off the world b/w CES and the months after.

    I think they plan to show how this eco-system is the future, while providing the most cutting edge technology and devices.
  12. #12  
    Ahhh. Looks like somebody else got their ducks in a row. This is good for consumer/corporate choice. The problem with ducks is if they don't fly away fast enough they get shot.
  13. #13  
    With all of those transactions, it's unbelieveable that people are still doubting a successful future for HP. It would be insane for them to spend all that money, and not produce something awesome. Simply mind-blowing... I think there will be a whole lot of " I told you so" threads once everything starts rolling out
    Due to the cancellation of the penny, I no longer give 2¢ about anything. I may however, give a nickel
  14. #14  
    Nice read! In 2011 we could very well see a shift in the force. Lol
    "Patience, use the force, think." Obi-Wan


    Ready to try Preware? Get this first: Preware Homebrew Documentation
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by sledge007 View Post
    With all of those transactions, it's unbelieveable that people are still doubting a successful future for HP. It would be insane for them to spend all that money, and not produce something awesome. Simply mind-blowing... I think there will be a whole lot of " I told you so" threads once everything starts rolling out
    Believe it or not (and some on here will be surprised), I'm not that confident of a successful future for HP, or at least, this part of HP.

    I think the potential for what (I believe) they are going to try to do is amazing. I'm not 100% sure that they are going to be successful at it. My experience in the technology/consumer field is that these things hardly follow a "planned route". Some notable examples:

    • RIM designed the Blackberry to be more of a smart-pager than a smartphone. High level security through a back-end server (BES) was almost an afterthought.
    • The iPhone was a music player with a phone added. The highly successful App Store (which is credited with much of the iPhone's success) was also almost an afterthought.
    • After the "divorce" between MS and IBM; OS2, a product so stable it was still used years later with almost no new development, ultimately went away, and most of us stare at windows from MS every day.

    That said, it would take substantial dollars, and substantial long term vision (and patience) to pull of such a designed plan.

    I think HP is one of the few companies to possess both. Though not a slam dunk, I believe they'll succeed.
  16. #16  
    All of this is like a giant puzzle and we are trying to put the puzzle together even though we aren't quite sure what it is supposed to be. I hope that we find that out soon.


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  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post

    Does that mean that they might end up with a great smartphone even though they didn't buy HP to be in the smartphone business?
    Yes
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    So when the CEO of HP said:

    We didn’t buy Palm to be in the smartphone business. And I tell people that, but it doesn’t seem to resonate well. We bought it for the IP. The WebOS is one of the two ground-up pieces of software that is built as a web operating environment…We have tens of millions of HP small form factor web-connected devices…Now imagine that being a web-connected environment where now you can get a common look and feel and a common set of services laid against that environment. That is a very value proposition.

    Does that mean that they might end up with a great smartphone even though they didn't buy HP to be in the smartphone business?
    And of course, you're choosing to ignore what was essentially a retraction (they labeled it a clarification). <<comment removed>>

    When we look at the market, we see an array of interconnected devices, including tablets, printers, and of course, smartphones. We believe webOS can become the backbone for many of HP's small form factor devices, and we expect to expand webOS's footprint beyond just the smartphone market, all while leveraging our financial strength, scale, and global reach to grow in smartphones
    Yeah yeah, I know. Doesn't fit the gloom and doom predictions some would like, but it is what it is.

    Besdies, isn't that CEO now gone?
    Last edited by Cantaffordit; 12/20/2010 at 07:01 PM. Reason: personal comment removed
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    HP's strategy for Palm is likely to be materially unaffected - it probably wasn't Mark Hurd's baby.
    So, it wasn't his baby, but you want to base the future on an off-the-cuff statement from him?

    Interesting, but pretty much fits the pattern.

    He personally clarified, in later statements, the context in which it was made. It still holds true.

    Getting into the smartphone business wasn't their purpose in buying Palm (they were already in that business). That doesn't mean they don't plan on doing it though.

    I suspect getting into the toner business wasn't the reason they built their first laser printer, but they seem to have embraced the idea...
  20. #20  
    Meanwhile, let's stay on the topic of the OP. We have a thread for CES expectations! Thanks.
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