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  1.    #1  
    Article in the Globe and Mail today argues that Treo will never succeed in the corporate market because of security concerns. The risk they refer to is losing your Treo with sensitive corporate information on it. Apparently, RIM's server software allows for sending a "self-destruct" signal to a misplaced Blackberry. While this is true, it doesen't seem like a big risk to me, especially if Treo had a power-on password option.

    The Treo is dismissed as a "distraction" and refers to Donna Dubinsky "conceding" that Handspring does not have the resources to build sophisticated server software.

    Comments anyone? I love my GPRS-enabled Treo, especially the underdog aspect of it, when you look at all the Blackberries around, but there is a high risk that Treo will remain a marginal product.
  2. #2  
    I think they make a good point and TreoMail should contain such a self-destruct command. It would easily be done over SMS.
  3. #3  
    If you use Treo Mail, you can stop delivery to the Treo at any time by logging into the Treo Mail website. Granted, that doesn't do anything to the data that's already on the Treo -- but, then again, the same could be said of a laptop, right, and I haven't heard of anybody who won't use a laptop because of the possibility that someone could obtain data from it.
  4. #4  
    It doesn't seem like a good reason to me for them to downgrade the Treo. I mean, it isn't that hard to make a program that acts as a "dead man's switch". Basically you have to enter in the password/command and the timer resets. If you don't enter it in within the time frame (everyday by Tues afternoon at 3:00pm for example) it wipes everything. Sure, it's an extreme but if you have sensitive data that is THAT important on your Treo, then it works.

    Of course, like it was said before, why not just use a "password when on" option? Seems to provided the same amount of security. Hell, why not have some kind of overclocking software run at insane speeds to burn the entire unit up so no one gets to its information? I mean if they're going to steal your Treo for the information, chances are they aren't going to return it afterwards and you wouldn't see it again anyways.
  5. #5  
    [B]Article in the Globe and Mail today argues that Treo will never succeed in the corporate market because of security concerns. The risk they refer to is losing your Treo with sensitive corporate information on it.
    That comment can be equally applied to *all* PDAs. And I don't see any corps getting rid of their PDAs.

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