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  1.    #1  
    Funny I thought this has been a problem for awhile, in regards to Android having manufacturers making phones around the clock. Heres a article from phonedog.net.....


    Just a little over a week ago, I bought my Verizon Galaxy Tab. I get home from class Friday morning and what am I greeted with? Rumors of the second iteration of the Galaxy Tab flooding the headlines. I know I shouldn't be complaining about business a-boomin', but it's getting a little too fast for anyone to keep up with, even for a tech-savvy nerd that eats computer chips for breakfast.

    I thought phones were being released fast about two years ago, but that was well before the current, hyperactive market. The norm was for a device to be out for eight or nine months, and a few months before the one-year mark, you would start hearing rumors of the next generation of that device. Over the past year, things have changed quite a bit. Take the Galaxy S for instance, the successor to it was rumored and had its specifications leaked before any of the first generation Galaxy S phones had even reached consumer hands in the US. It's cool to hear about future phones with drool-inducing specs, but before the original device even hits the market? It's a buzz-kill that diminishes everyones excitement over the devices that are currently out, which are still great devices.

    The most adverse effect of these devices getting leaked so soon is it causes apprehension when it comes to buying a new phone or tablet. By nature, most of us want the latest and greatest, but phones aren't cheap, and at the rate the manufacturers are pumping out new devices, their release dates are just before they hit obsolete status. You can't play the waiting game forever, but spending $500 or more on a device only for it to become outdated about the time you buy it is extremely aggravating.

    Manufacturers need to throttle down, a lot. Companies like HTC and Samsung have released countless devices this year and diluted the market. They have ranged from low to high-quality smartphones and feature phones, they have all been released back-to-back, and they're not done yet. New devices are released almost weekly or bi-weekly, which is mind-blowing. A major side effect of this is a noticeable decline in build quality or more problems at release. Look at the iPhone 4, there was a major design flaw overlooked with this device. Even some BlackBerrys have hit the market with design issues (trackball and speakers). Some Galaxy S devices were released with a GPS lock issue. Also, the Samsung Focus had microSD card issues at launch. Whether it be software or hardware the manufacturers are letting more and more errors slip by unnoticed. They need to take a step back, focus, and slow way down.

    The good things is, there is no shortage of devices to choose from and almost any form factor to accommodate to nearly everyone's wants and needs. The bad? The market is so diluted that it's hard for most people to make a decision on their next phone, many of those people are too busy playing the endless waiting game to worry about what's currently out, and the build quality of the current devices compared to past devices is slipping. Something needs to be done, but I'm betting it will be quite a while before we see any kind of change or the market slow any.

    www.phonedog.net


    what do you think, is the market saturated with dozens of devices too quickly? Do you think HP/Palm should follow what Google is doing, or make one or two a year?
  2. cgk
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    #2  
    Do you think HP/Palm should follow what Google is doing, or make one or two a year?
    It's a good question, Apple get away with one device and one upgrade a year because they are a super-brand, pretty much everyone else is engaged in a race to the bottom. He's wrong in that the market is going to slow, it's going to accelerate and device life-cycles are going to get shorter (Android handsets currently have an average life of 4.5 months). I think it's going to be very hard for HP as a shifter of grey boxes to emulate the apple model.
  3. xtn
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    #3  
    Just because a successor comes out two weeks after you buy something doesn't mean the one you bought is outdated. If you bought something that suited your needs it should be fine. The fact that a newer product comes out doesn't change that. Your needs haven't changed.

    I don't get the desire to waste money on a new product unless the feature set substantially moves closer to my ideal. Just getting the newest thing, by itself, doesn't accomplish that.
  4. #4  
    You have to look at it on a company level. Is HTC making too many? Is Samsung? Is HP? Is Apple?

    For example, HTC has just one premium android phone on Sprint. It's going on 6 months since the Evo released. It'll probably be at least 10-12 months before we see a hardware update to the Evo.

    So if you want a better Evo, its not been two weeks, or two months, we're still waiting. Even the upcoming Evo Shift won't be a better Evo as its a different form factor.
  5. #5  
    I think the Android "reputation" is what gets hurt the most.

    Most people don't really lock into what their phone is or where it is in their life cycle, or the OS version.

    They just vaguely know its Android, and stuff either works or doesn't.

    It leads to an inconsistent experience with regard to branding the OS and the handset.

    Which may or may not matter to a handset manufacturer -they are still selling phones - but it could matter to the long term adoption of Android over, specifically, IOS.
  6. #6  
    This guy is a little off his mark. A case could be made for Motorola/Verizon's DROID series, Driod, Driod X, Droid 2, Droid 2 Global all released in relatively quick succession. Also if the successor of the Galaxy Tab really was leaked that would be a problem as well.

    Releasing lower-end phones along side the higher-end phones isn't a big deal, not everyone needs something like the EVO but I do think that some of these companies need to streamline some of their lines and even out their release cycles. I'm kind of hoping that HPalm takes a 3 "tiered" approach to their phones with the Pixi, Pre, "slate" with annual or later refreshes with true, debugged updates and not just stop-gaps to meet some predetermined release cycle. I personally prefer something to come out late and working rather then on-time and buggy.
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by cardfan View Post
    You have to look at it on a company level. Is HTC making too many? Is Samsung? Is HP? Is Apple?

    For example, HTC has just one premium android phone on Sprint. It's going on 6 months since the Evo released. It'll probably be at least 10-12 months before we see a hardware update to the Evo.

    So if you want a better Evo, its not been two weeks, or two months, we're still waiting. Even the upcoming Evo Shift won't be a better Evo as its a different form factor.
    true but even as the shift passes FCC already HTC Shift Evo 4G clears FCC | Dialed In - CNET Blogs and rumored to be released very soon most likely Q1, its still to me very fast. You forget that its about cell phones in general thats being released. Look at motorla they have gone bannans, from the droid, the droid incrediable, droid x, droid pro, droid pro 2 all high end devices and in a 12 month period thats way too much. To me its saturating the market because not only is it too many choices, its of the same OS in android, and most of them are released with a different version of Android. I agree with the author that it will slow sooner or later, because people will finally get why keep spending 500 a pop after they update on a phone with similar specs, every 4 to 6 months. They will also start looking around, just because Android is too much in their face. To me I think it will backfire on Google, because these companies like HTC, moto, and samsung are really competing with each other, and have to keep releasing a upgrade to their device, because their co company using Android just released another one. To me most people will eventully go back to a OS that took their time on 1 or 2 form factors, that have only those 2 forms a year, and support them with the same updated OS. Hence to me where Webos can captialize on. Even if you look at the iphone 4 this year, their sales still were very good, and thats one model on one carrier, with antanna issues, taking in consideration at this point its Apple.
  8. #8  
    I agree. I'm a tech geek who routinely splurges on the latest gadgets but it's been extremely difficult to keep pace with tecnhnological innovation.
  9. #9  
    The proliferation of smartphones is a good thing.

    Back in 2000-2003 timeframe, smartphone models were few and far between. It was unprecedented for a provider to have more than 3-4 smartphones total in its lineup. At the same time, regular wireless phones (sometimes called dumbphones) were sprouting up all over the place. It wasn't unusual for a provider to have 25 different phones in its stable - with several new models being added each month.

    Fast forward to 2010: Smartphones have become more of a commodity. The real money, except in rare instances, is volume sales and that is accomplished, in part, by creating a range of phones that fills in all the various submarkets (candy bars, vertical sliders, horizontal sliders, hardware keyboard, virtual keyboard, no camera, 1 camera, 2 camera, etc) just like the dumb phones were doing at the beginning of the decade. So while Motorola may have 5 Androids at Verizon now, they come in various flavors like media-centric flagship, low end horizontal slider, basic business horizontal slider, a business world phone, and a business candy bar phone with hardware keyboard. It's nice to have choices.

    HTC is trying to fill niches too.

    So is Samsung.

    And now LG is coming on.

    Palm will be back "soon."

    And Rim has been there all along.

    Did I mention it's nice to have choices in the smartphone world? It really sucked when we didn't and I wouldn't dream of whining about it now that we do.
  10. #10  
    I fully agree with you there - but the trend has been towards product update waves crashing into one another, and I agree with the Article in that this has a serious potential for customer alienation. It does feel weird to buy a new high-tech product if its successor is already being talked about.

    HP now has a unique chance of doing things "right" the way Apple is doing AND the way the Android manufacturers aren't: be on a regular one-year refresh cycle for each model AND release a new phone every couple of months. Of course, it remains to be seen what they actually do with the ball now it's in their court.
  11. #11  
    (IMO) I believe Hp|Palm need to develop a routine of delivering one or two device every year.
  12. #12  
    The pace of the smartphone market is not driven by innovation, but desperation. They are all acting on the premiss that whoever is currently in the news is the one who wins. There is simply no way for them to stay in the news other than by rapid iteration.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by RUSH View Post
    (IMO) I believe Hp|Palm need to develop a routine of delivering one or two device every year.
    or if more than two a year, release one of each form factor yearly - spaced out over the year. That will give them the PRPRPR $bump$ $they$ $may$ $want$ $without$ '$eating$ $their$ $own$ $young$'. $Under$ $such$ $a$ $plan$ $they$ $could$ $have$ $releases$ $every$ $3$ $or$ $4$ $months$.

    Do the Tablets in late October since that is the item most likely to sell at year end as a gift.

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