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  1.    #1  
    Greetings,

    I've had my Treo 300 for about three weeks, and am gradually getting used to making the most of it. I'll share a couple of true stories from the last couple of days, and invite others to do the same.

    Personal Use--
    My teenage daughter and I went to San Francisco recently for an outing (we live about an hour from SF), with part of the reason for the trip the plan to visit Japantown and pick up a Japanese-English dictionary to help her in her studies. There was a bewildering number of such dictionaries to choose from in the store. So I pulled out my 300, loaded Amazon, and found which dictionaries were most popular there. (Yes, I know I could have bought it from Amazon in the first instance, but then we wouldn't have had the pleasure of the expedition!

    Business Use--
    I work in a nonprofit organization, and was at lunch with a major donor. We were planning a social outing with our spouses to a local jazz club. I used my Treo to find out the hours and the groups that are playing, and we used this information to plan the outing. (I'll note that I, not my employer, paid for the Treo.)

    Later this same day, I was in a lengthy meeting. I checked my email on the Treo, and found a message from another donor/supporter who was unexpectedly in town, and who wanted to meet in about an hour. I excused myself from the meeting, and used the Treo as a cell phone to arrange the meeting. The donor's name was in the contacts application; I noted the meeting time on the calendar.

    After setting up the new meeting, I returned to the meeting in progress. I recalled that an item on eBay that I had been monitoring (a parallel port interface flash card reader, that we wanted for one of our rather outdated computers) was going to close in a couple of hours. Using my Treo, I put in the winning bid.
    Soon the alarm on the Treo beeped, indicating that it was time to go to the next meeting.

    None of the uses of the Treo that I mention above were strictly necessary, but they were helpful and enjoyable; they changed, a little bit, the ways in which I played and worked. I'll also note that these uses were not terribly data intensive, and that the 2 MB plan or perhaps the additional 6 MB would be enough to support this kind of use.

    In closing, these are a couple of my stories. Please share yours!

    Kami
  2. #2  
    The biggest use of my Treo 300 is to play freecell. Not far behind is reading E-books. I have read four novels since getting it. One of my biggest concerns in switching was the smaller display. But that doesn't seem to be a problem it is still easier that reading the printed page.

    I also use Wordsmith to record projects I work on. At the end of the month I import it in to Word, clean it up a bit, then use it for my monthly report.

    But it really got a work out on my vacation. I had pre-loaded links to weather forecasts and weather radars for the areas we were going to be in. I also used it to check my home E-mail, though I had no way to reply if it had been needed. I was unable to use my Treo to check my work mail as the Exchange sever will only recognize IE or Netscape. Unfortunately though much of the early part of our trip I was out of contact. After going though Des Moines on parts of I35 I had voice, but no data. And after leaving I35 I didn’t even have voice until the next day when we hit I90. So much for “Nationwide”. But the most useful application was my mapping program. I used the connector from the car charger to connect the Treo to a GPS receiver. Then using a program called Trippilot I could get door to door instructions and maps to get from where I was to where I wanted to be. For example using the Hotel we were at in Wisconsin Dells I download instructions that took me right to an address in Greendale, WI with no problem even though I had never been within 500 miles of either place before.
  3.    #3  
    Originally posted by Starlord III
    I used the connector from the car charger to connect the Treo to a GPS receiver. Then using a program called Trippilot I could get door to door instructions and maps to get from where I was to where I wanted to be... I download instructions that took me right to an address in Greendale, WI with no ....
    Very interesting! Could you tell us more about this--what kind of GPS receiver, how you connected it to the Treo, etc.

    Thanks!

    Kami
  4. #4  
    Reminder went off to pick up dinner. Sent text message to the wife asking if she wanted sushi. I remembered the restaurant name but could not remember the number. Went to online yellow pages, got the number, called the restaurant and placed the order, sent a text message back to my wife.

    Love my Treo (and my wife)
  5. #5  
    I was in a store. Someone came up to me needing to find a Radio Shack. I used Vindigo to find it, dial it, confirm they had the part they needed, and show the guy directions. Really cool.
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by Kami


    Very interesting! Could you tell us more about this--what kind of GPS receiver, how you connected it to the Treo, etc.

    Thanks!

    The GPS is an old one that came with Rand McNally Tripmaker that I got three years ago. It was meant to plug into a Laptop. Back in 99 I used it with my Laptop. But having a laptop in the front seat with two people is a pain, not to mention dangerous. Then last year I used the GPS module for the Palm III and in many ways that worked much better. Later last year when I upgraded to the Prism and the Sprint digital link I built an adapter that supplied +5V for the GPS though a PS2 connector and a 9-pin connector for the serial data that went though a RS232 converter to the Prism. I also added a separate 6V power supply for the Prism. I never had the chance to take that system on vacation. For the Treo all I did was to add a third power supply for it. I added a second cable to the same connections on the RS232 converter. The connector turned out to be a lot easier than I had feared. The top and bottom shells pry apart fairly easy. Once you have the shell removed there is a small PCB that is attached to the connector itself. It had labeled solder pads for the important pins, RXD, TXD which is the serial in and out. And there is Vdock and GND which had the wires from the lighter connector soldered to them. I just solder the four wires from my cable to the solder pads and I thought I was ready. But the Treo didn’t recognize that the GPS was connected. Then I thought that maybe if I grounded the serial cradle detect it might work. I found two solder pads on the back of the PCB that connected to pin-4, serial cradle detect and pin-6 GND. After I short these to pads everything worked just fine.

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