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  1.    #1  
    Hi all, FYI, take care, Jay

    HP Partners Prepare For webOS Tablets
    By Zewde Yeraswork, CRN 5:04 PM EST Tue. Oct. 05, 2010

    http://www.crn.com/227700150/printablearticle.htm

    Hewlett-Packard is preparing to roll out new tablets based on its webOS platform, acquired with its purchase of struggling phone manufacturer Palm in April.

    Last month, HP's CTO for global gaming Rahul Sood said that HP plans to release several webOS-based products with a new form factor over the next year.

    HP's partners expect webOS to be an important differentiator as HP goes up against Apple and Google in the fast-emerging market for tablet devices.

    "People look for options. When [Former HP CEO] Mark Hurd originally completed the Palm acquisition, the first thing I said was, 'He's going to be putting webOS on the tablet to compete with the iPad.' I think itís a better alternative than the Android OS, which is not that clean from a look and feel perspective in terms of user friendliness," said Bob Venero, President and CEO of Future Tech.

    "We do expect webOS to have an impact," said Rich Chernick, CEO of Medford, Oregon-based Connecting Point Computer Centers." This is new technology and I'm eager to find out how it's going to function. I see what Apple has accomplished in such a short time. HP will have to compete somehow. They have to make it as beautiful and easy to run as the iPad. I'm excited to present this to the business community for healthcare, for a number of industries."

    Next: How Will HP Tailor Its Tablets To Enterprise Software
    One HP solution provider who has been working with prototype tablet PCs running webOS is pleased with what he's seen so far. HP uses the term "Slates" for its tablets.

    "Our Denali health-care business has been a key part of our mobile to market strategy. We see the tablet and the HP Slate as a key part of our mobility solutions," said John Convery, executive vice president of vendor relations and marketing at Denali Advanced Integration, a Redmond, Wash.-based HP partner. He added, "HP has sent Denali pre-production Slate units, and we are testing and engaging our customers in the process. The feedback is exceeding our expectations."

    Although partners are eagerly awaiting the arrival of HP Slates, these devices have been slow to market. At CES in January, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer showed off a prototype HP Slate running Windows 7, but since then neither company has offered specifics about when that product will be available. HP's acquisition of Palm caused speculation that it had abandoned its Windows 7 tablet plans, but in August HP confirmed its intention to offer both Windows 7 and webOS powered devices.

    "You'll see us with a Microsoft product in the near future, and a WebOS-based product early next year," Todd Bradley, executive vice president of HP's Personal Systems Group, said in August during HP's Q3 earnings call.

    As for why it's taking so long for HP to bring its Slate to market, Chernick said the delay should only add to the anticipation: "The delay in bringing the Slate to market suggests they're making several changes to make sure it's full of applications and ready to go. I can only wait and see, but I'm eager to find out how it's going to function."

    Next: How Will HP Fare In A Crowded Tablet Market?
    One potential problem for HP is that it's entering a market that may be on the verge of being too crowded. Google's Android OS and Apple's iOS have both proven to be successful in reviving the tablet category, but it's unclear if tablets running Windows 7 and webOS will be able to generate the same level of interest.

    "The real question is whether the market will accept another player in this space," Venero said. "But there will be some success and growth involved in it, absolutely. HP didn't spend all that money on Palm just to throw it away."

    Although Apple's iPad has been a hit with consumers, it has yet to carve out a niche in the business market. Tyler Dikman president and CEO of CoolTronics, a Tampa Fla.-based solution provider, sees this as an area of opportunity for HP.

    "With Google coming out with their tablet soon, the way I see this impacting channel partners would be if they market this device as a corporate tablet," said Dikman. "Apple has no real share in the corporate space. Because of Apple's lack of focus on the business space, they will never win where HP is providing enterprise-level software and support."

    Next: HP Sends Mixed Signals Over The Summer
    In tackling this new market, HP's partners say the company has an advantage in terms of size and scalability.

    "HP has the resources and the R&D clout to do anything," Convery said. "It's all part of their converged infrastructure. They've got the powerful tech teams and powerful marketing and products and services across their entire portfolio."

    HP has trademarked the name "PalmPad" in order to challenge the popular Apple iPad with a webOS touchscreen device of its own.

    In filing for the PalmPad trademark, HP said it was for "computers, computer hardware, computer software, computer peripherals, portable computers, handheld and mobile computers, PDAs, electronic notepads, mobile digital electronic devices."

    Next: HP Sets Goals For Its Tablets
    Though a specific product timeline is not yet available, HP has already publicly floated a figure representing the entire tablet market. Todd Bradley evaluated the market for tablets over the coming years at about $40 billion.

    Bradley also confirmed HP's pursuit of the webOS strategy, citing the advantage of having a consistent interface between phones and tablets.

    With so much riding on tablets, it looks as though HP has big expectations for webOS.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. spare's Avatar
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    #2  
    Great find. Sounds like a prototype webos tablet is already out in the wild.

    One HP solution provider who has been working with prototype tablet PCs running webOS is pleased with what he's seen so far. HP uses the term "Slates" for its tablets.
  3. #3  
    Now if HP would just send me a prototype to play with I will be a happy camper.
  4. #4  
    this is all old news
  5. bnceo's Avatar
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by spare View Post
    Great find. Sounds like a prototype webos tablet is already out in the wild.
    Just an FYI, a lot of times, prototypes that are going to be for cell networks are first built with GSM simply because it's easier to just drop in a SIM Card and not register a ESN with CDMA.

    Reason I say this is because if we do get a leak for a WebOS tablet in the wild, don't freak out if it's rocking AT&T in the video/picture.

    As I said, it's easy to try it out on GSM. Keeps things more secret.
  6. #6  
    I guess some of their other "partners" might be Best Buy, Costco and the like. I see HP stuff sold at those places too. Is "partner" a euphemism for "retail store" in HP-speak?
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    I guess some of their other "partners" might be Best Buy, Costco and the like. I see HP stuff sold at those places too. Is "partner" a euphemism for "retail store" in HP-speak?
    I wonder if the "partners" would include Office Depot and Staples, etc? I notice that the IPad is now being sold at Target stores.
  8. rkguy's Avatar
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    #8  
    Strange that there is No mention of the blackberry tablet which is definitely going for the jugular in corporate applications
    ...This programming stuff is actually addictive but really hard :/
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rkguy View Post
    Strange that there is No mention of the blackberry tablet which is definitely going for the jugular in corporate applications
    Yes, I wondered about that.
  10. #10  
    I've also noted that the videos showing the prototype HP slate have been removed from circulation, in fact, both of them. I wonder what that means? Is HP close to an announcement? Inquiring minds want to know.
  11. #11  
    I think I am starting to see a trend with what HP wants to do with webOS. I think they see OS as the key to tying together a lot of devices. So, they can get us to buy into their ecosystem. If you buy their printers (probably one of the most popular in corporate world), then why not buy the tablet that works seamlessly with it when you go from one meeting to another. As long as you have those two products you might as well buy that smartphone that also works seamlessly with the tablet and printer when you are on the go. Maybe even try and integrate webOS (or its services) in some form into a laptop/desktop.

    So lets go with the Healthcare field (since it was mentioned in the article). Imagine you go see your doctor and she comes in to the exam room and has a "PalmPad" that lets her take notes and fill out her charts. She can prescribe any medication. This all syncs to the cloud. So now she can run off to closest printer and get your prescription for you to take to the pharmacist and automatically sends the notification to the pharmacy.

    Lets say a day or two later you have some weird reaction to the medication. You can send an email to her. No matter were she is at she gets her email and can quickly access her charts and let you know what to do. Also, since all this data is in the clouds she can make this available to other doctors on the system.

    All of this will work fully integrated since they all will operate under some webOS system.

    I have to say that if HP intends to market this as an enterprise system it will be a very good thing for webOS's future. No corporation would allow inferior hardware or laggy software. So they will have to up the game considerably (it seems they have) to get those accounts. We the mass consumers will also reap the benefits.
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by zulfaqar621 View Post
    I think I am starting to see a trend with what HP wants to do with webOS. I think they see OS as the key to tying together a lot of devices. So, they can get us to buy into their ecosystem. If you buy their printers (probably one of the most popular in corporate world), then why not buy the tablet that works seamlessly with it when you go from one meeting to another. As long as you have those two products you might as well buy that smartphone that also works seamlessly with the tablet and printer when you are on the go. Maybe even try and integrate webOS (or its services) in some form into a laptop/desktop.

    So lets go with the Healthcare field (since it was mentioned in the article). Imagine you go see your doctor and she comes in to the exam room and has a "PalmPad" that lets her take notes and fill out her charts. She can prescribe any medication. This all syncs to the cloud. So now she can run off to closest printer and get your prescription for you to take to the pharmacist and automatically sends the notification to the pharmacy.

    Lets say a day or two later you have some weird reaction to the medication. You can send an email to her. No matter were she is at she gets her email and can quickly access her charts and let you know what to do. Also, since all this data is in the clouds she can make this available to other doctors on the system.

    All of this will work fully integrated since they all will operate under some webOS system.

    I have to say that if HP intends to market this as an enterprise system it will be a very good thing for webOS's future. No corporation would allow inferior hardware or laggy software. So they will have to up the game considerably (it seems they have) to get those accounts. We the mass consumers will also reap the benefits.
    I believe you are right. Maybe that's why HP seems to be taking so long to present these items. They need to get it right the first time or they could lose the game.
  13. #13  
    maybe hp is taking so long because they want to have all the new products (phone(s), tablet, printer, toaster (lol), etc) ready to debut everything at the same time to show how the interact and connect with one another. That might be a better show than debuting one at a time...show how webos works across many devices....
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by notalexrz View Post
    maybe hp is taking so long because they want to have all the new products (phone(s), tablet, printer, toaster (lol), etc) ready to debut everything at the same time to show how the interact and connect with one another. That might be a better show than debuting one at a time...show how webos works across many devices....
    Makes sense.
  15. #15  
    hp and palm have said that since day 1 when the merge was announced.

    and yes as stated in previous posts this is one of the reasons why we haven't seen any devices yet. Let hp get it right the first time, something they an afford to do

    Quote Originally Posted by zulfaqar621 View Post
    I think I am starting to see a trend with what HP wants to do with webOS. I think they see OS as the key to tying together a lot of devices. So, they can get us to buy into their ecosystem. If you buy their printers (probably one of the most popular in corporate world), then why not buy the tablet that works seamlessly with it when you go from one meeting to another. As long as you have those two products you might as well buy that smartphone that also works seamlessly with the tablet and printer when you are on the go. Maybe even try and integrate webOS (or its services) in some form into a laptop/desktop.

    So lets go with the Healthcare field (since it was mentioned in the article). Imagine you go see your doctor and she comes in to the exam room and has a "PalmPad" that lets her take notes and fill out her charts. She can prescribe any medication. This all syncs to the cloud. So now she can run off to closest printer and get your prescription for you to take to the pharmacist and automatically sends the notification to the pharmacy.

    Lets say a day or two later you have some weird reaction to the medication. You can send an email to her. No matter were she is at she gets her email and can quickly access her charts and let you know what to do. Also, since all this data is in the clouds she can make this available to other doctors on the system.

    All of this will work fully integrated since they all will operate under some webOS system.

    I have to say that if HP intends to market this as an enterprise system it will be a very good thing for webOS's future. No corporation would allow inferior hardware or laggy software. So they will have to up the game considerably (it seems they have) to get those accounts. We the mass consumers will also reap the benefits.
  16. djmcgee's Avatar
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    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by notalexrz View Post
    maybe hp is taking so long because they want to have all the new products (phone(s), tablet, printer, toaster (lol), etc) ready to debut everything at the same time to show how the interact and connect with one another. That might be a better show than debuting one at a time...show how webos works across many devices....
    I really think this is the case. HP is taking the time to put together a complete suite of products that work together.

    Although I am only interested in the smartphones right now, I think it will be interesting.
    Dan
  17. mike5's Avatar
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    #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    This idea that individual users will buy a tablet based on the printer they have at the office sounds, frankly, ridiculous. A tablet, and smartphone for that matter, is a personal device that you carry around with you in your personal and professional life. Half the fun is giving it to your kids to play games, listen to music, or watch a movie while you are in the car. How it integrates with printers or toasters at the office is hardly a consideration.

    I think the term "seamless integration" is code for "Yeah, we have lots of different kinds of stuff - and that's a good thing."
    Apple has tied things together through iTunes. It downloads apps, books, movies, etc. It is what ties things together. The fact that their products, small through large, just work w/iTunes--w/o the glitches--helps it to be successful. What is important is that it just works & you don't need anti virus, anti spyware, anti spam to make it work. That is critical to HP if they are going to build an ecosystem. It has to just work.

    HP hasn't said you have to have their printers if you want to work w/their phones. Their latest, the printer has its own e-mail, regardless of the device you are using; however, if there is a simple, functional & likable OS that is familiar to the user across many of their products, I think consumers are likely to buy more of the products that use that OS--professional or personal.

    Remember, their target isn't just the individual consumer, businesses & corporations are a huge target consumer. These consumers may prefer their systems simplified by a common OS. I think simple, familiar, & gets the job done should be critical to HP's product line.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike5 View Post
    Apple has tied things together through iTunes. It downloads apps, books, movies, etc. It is what ties things together. The fact that their products, small through large, just work w/iTunes--w/o the glitches--helps it to be successful. What is important is that it just works & you don't need anti virus, anti spyware, anti spam to make it work. That is critical to HP if they are going to build an ecosystem. It has to just work.

    HP hasn't said you have to have their printers if you want to work w/their phones. Their latest, the printer has its own e-mail, regardless of the device you are using; however, if there is a simple, functional & likable OS that is familiar to the user across many of their products, I think consumers are likely to buy more of the products that use that OS--professional or personal.

    Remember, their target isn't just the individual consumer, businesses & corporations are a huge target consumer. These consumers may prefer their systems simplified by a common OS. I think simple, familiar, & gets the job done should be critical to HP's product line.

    You don't need iTunes to use a Mac.
  19. mike5's Avatar
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    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Really mobile View Post
    You don't need iTunes to use a Mac.
    AND, I never said that.

    I said iTunes is part of what ties their ecosystem together. I said it is a delivery system for music, movies, books, etc. I said it can be on all things Apple--small to big--from nano to touch to iphone to macbook to imac. I said it works--even for a beginner. If you want to deny this, go right ahead. I have owned different Apple products over the years. Their exponential growth speaks for itself.

    What I said was I hope HP has something--webOS--that ties things together, works across multiple products, is easy to use, and JUST WORKS. Something that rallies the consumer & distinguishes themselves going forward. They made a large investment in Palm for that very reason, IMO. I love my original Sprint Pre. It is my hope that HP & HP Palm will be successful going forward.

    Man, people are on edge today & I wish they would quit taking things out of context to criticize others.

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