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  1. #81  
    Quote Originally Posted by ego2001 View Post
    Got that rich-guy-in-a-position-of-power disease, eh?

    Sad. You have to appreciate things, or you will lose them.

    Enough on that. The strategic plans for the products have no need to change, as they don't involve any specific executives.
    Agreed. And, by showing that original headline from Engagdet, you remind me to be ticked off. This was only a "sexual harassment investigation" at the very beginning. Clearly, it turned into something else pretty early in. So, I'm sure that the pseudo-journalists at Engadget love using the titillation factor to draw in readers, but that title is terribly misleading.

    This was pretty much always a case of business ethics, not sexual harassment. God, but I hate the state of tech "journalism" today.
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > HTC Mogul (*****!) > HTC Touch Pro (***** squared!) > PRE! > Epic
  2. cooknn's Avatar
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    #82  
    Guess my first take on this clown was correct. Glad he's gone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cooknn
    The more I listen to Mark Hurd, the more I don't like him. He is nothing but a bunch of catch phrases and CEO jargon. "I think we're being extremely innovative in the market. We like the market. We think the market will scale in terms of uh, in terms of size..."

    Who is this guy?!
    Dave Cook | Fort Myers, Florida | Palm pre | Touchstone | Vaja iVolution Deco
  3. #83  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooknn View Post
    Guess my first take on this clown was correct. Glad he's gone.

    I said this about him less than 20 hours before he was canned -- coincidence ???


    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post

    ...As far as HP having a credible consistent strategic vision -- they are not Apple -- they are run and managed by pea brained bean counters.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  4. #84  
    Well, now, HP has been performing extremely well and is very well-positioned for future growth. They're strong or dominant in a number of key markets, including PCs, servers, network/telecom infrastructure, IT services, and cloud services, and they continue to make apparently intelligent acquisitions. They're growing in revenues and profitability (even considering the acquisitions), and don't show any serious weaknesses. And all of this during the worst recession in years.

    I'm not sure how anyone can conclude that HP is "managed by pea brained bean counters." What am I missing here? Even where HP has been weak, i.e., in smartphones, they've made an acquisition that makes them instantly differentiated, at least. They won't be simply another HTC or Samsung trying to make a better Android skin than the other 50 Android handsets on the market.

    And note, where Hurd sounded like a CEO, full of "catchphrases and CEO jargon," is pretty much how CEOs present themselves to the market. There wouldn't be such a thing as "CEO jargon" if CEO's didn't tend to talk that way. However, being the face of an organization is only one aspect of being a CEO, and much of what we call jargon is really just technical terms for very meaningful business strategies.

    Take a word that's been tossed around quite a bit with regard to Palm, i.e., "scale." That word has a very distinct real-world meaning, which is that HP has the resources to put webOS in more devices and more markets than Palm could have ever accomplished themselves. When Hurd or anyone uses that in describing why they think HP can make Palm and webOS successful, they're not just throwing around a meaningless catchphrase.

    Now, I've read arguments that Hurd just capitalized on what Fiorina started, in terms of the Compaq acquisition and other tactics along the same lines as HP's current strategy. But even if that's true, one can't argue that he did a good job of executing a viable strategy that's grown HP into the world's largest technology company.
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > HTC Mogul (*****!) > HTC Touch Pro (***** squared!) > PRE! > Epic
  5. #85  
    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post
    I said this about him less than 20 hours before he was canned -- coincidence ???
    And seriously, he wasn't "canned" because of poor performance. Quite the opposite. He was canned for violating HP's business ethics policies. Nobody at HP or anyone else has been questioning the job he did in running HP.
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > HTC Mogul (*****!) > HTC Touch Pro (***** squared!) > PRE! > Epic
  6. #86  
    Quote Originally Posted by Workerb33 View Post
    @BARYE

    NeXT wasn't a total failure. It became the basis of OS9 and turned the Mac into a serious computer, saving the company...
    Actually, it became the basis of OS-X & iOS.
  7. #87  
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoochild View Post
    Secondly, how does any of this affect palm in the short term. Mark Hurd had no influence on them in the short time he was CEO of the company that now owns palm. It will still be business as usual in Sunnyvale.
    I sure hope not. As I recall, 'business as usual' has been a major loss in market share, a bumbling product launch, inability to generate buzz/new business, serious loss of revenue, and the eventual surrender to the highest bidder. HP has much higher standards that what's been going on in Sunnyvale for the lat few years.
  8. #88  
    Quote Originally Posted by Kupe View Post
    I sure hope not. As I recall, 'business as usual' has been a major loss in market share, a bumbling product launch, inability to generate buzz/new business, serious loss of revenue, and the eventual surrender to the highest bidder. HP has much higher standards that what's been going on in Sunnyvale for the lat few years.
    My argument was to point out that Hurd leaving won't effect palm, definitely not in any negative way at least. Marketshare and everything else is subject for an entirely different thread.
  9. #89  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    Actually, it became the basis of OS-X & iOS.
    yep
  10. #90  
    Quote Originally Posted by wynand32 View Post

    ...I'm not sure how anyone can conclude that HP is "managed by pea brained bean counters." What am I missing here? Even where HP has been weak, i.e., in smartphones, they've made an acquisition that makes them instantly differentiated, at least. They won't be simply another HTC or Samsung trying to make a better Android skin than the other 50 Android handsets on the market.
    ...

    I just can't top what was said by BARYE (voted handsomest monkey of 1807) regarding HP, back in February -- so I will just copy it here:

    Quote Originally Posted by BARYE View Post

    ...Contrast this with HP -- who are an abomination -- we will not purchase any HP product no matter the cost.

    HP's tech support is a joke -- uninformed, and untrained in anything but misstating the date when your warranty expires, and in continually striving to persuade you that any problems are not their fault (and in any event can only be discussed with an "extended support" charge.

    Whether its printers, laptops, or desktops -- HP is absolutely the WORST !!

    A recent reliability survey showed the 25% of HP laptops failed during their first 3 years.

    PC World had this to say about HP:

    "...After watching HP turn in dismal results on our survey for the past several years, we asked what was happening. Why were our readers rating a top-tier company as subpar in reliability and support, year after year?..."

    This is the company you believe had wonderful management. The reality is that from Fiorina to Hurd, HP met its earning reports by coldly slashing jobs, shipping those jobs overseas, decimating them in North America, and dramatically outsourcing to India. I think it was Fiorina alone who slashed 50,000 american jobs -- most in California, BTW -- where she has the Chutzpah to now being running for Governor there on a platform of bringing back jobs there (after losing her job at HP. Extraordinary.

    Hewlitt and Packard were both fiercely protective of HP's reputation for quality, innovation, and reliability. They were both proud of growing their company while preserving and protecting their workers. I know they would be both ashamed to be associated with either Hurd or Fiorina.

    (for some reason the insert graphic option is not working)

    http://jet-screamer.com/images/laptop_failure.gif
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by BARYE; 08/08/2010 at 04:27 AM.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  11. #91  
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoochild View Post
    My argument was to point out that Hurd leaving won't effect palm, definitely not in any negative way at least. Marketshare and everything else is subject for an entirely different thread.
    Hurd leaving might not affect the Palm division, but Hurd's replacement sure could. If it's Todd Bradley (current front runner for the post), it probably would be good for Palm. If it's someone else who doesn't share Hurd's vision, then anything can happen to a small division of 600-700 people in a 300,000 employee company.
  12. #92  
    it wasn't hurd's vision. It was the vision of PSD that sold the vision to hurd.
  13. #93  
    Hi all,

    Personally, I think no matter who comes in for the job, it will work out fine for Palm.....HP has to keep Apple at bay, the only way that HP can is with webOS!

    Take care,

    Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  14. #94  
    though the article below does not support or address my narrative that HP has allowed its products and reputation for quality to plummet in recent years, I'm posting it because I know it will provide solace to some.

    (For the record, I know of the EDS acquisition, and of hurd's drive to get into IT consulting and services -- and out of commodity hardware.)



    HP Will Move Past This Dark Cloud

    By Eric Bleeker
    August 7, 2010

    A Friday after-hours press release with major news is the modern business equivalent of Corleone family consigliere Tom Hagen offering to make "trouble disappear." By Monday, the news will be stale and investors will be focusing on the next major story.

    Bury the news
    So when Hewlett-Packard (NYSE: HPQ) announced yesterday that CEO Mark Hurd would be stepping down amid sexual harassment allegations, the press release came promptly at 4:05 p.m. ET -- after trading had ended. It was a classic move from the public relations playbook.

    But Hewlett-Packard took the practice to another level. It not only announced Hurd's departure, it bundled that news with preliminary third-quarter results. The company beat revenue estimates while topping analyst projections by a penny per share on the bottom line. It also raised full-year and fourth-quarter guidance, but the increased figure only put HP in line with current expectations. For technology firms reporting earnings, merely meeting guidance has been a recipe for investors to sell off shares.

    I'll give credit where credit's due: HP took swift action and ousted Hurd when improprieties came to light. Yet the timing and style of the announcement leaves something to be desired. And while HP might hope that the bundled good/bad news shows its underlying financial strength, that's just smoke and mirrors.

    I see this as simply burying all the bad news at once. Still, no matter how you feel about HP's actions, based on current after-hours trading, we're looking at more than $8 billion of shareholder wealth lost since Thursday's close.

    Other than that, how was the play, Mrs. Lincoln?
    Aside from PRPRPR $shenanigans$, $what$ $does$ $the$ $move$ $mean$ $for$ $HP$?

    Mark Hurd has been the company's CEO since 2005. During his tenure, Hurd has been lauded for making HP leaner and for moving into high-margin areas that provide better returns for shareholders.Time Frame

    Sales (TTM)
    Profit Margin (TTM)
    Return on Equity (TTM)

    When Mark Hurd Took Over HP
    $83.3 billion
    4.3%
    9.3%

    Today's HP
    $120.4 billion
    7.1%
    20.3%


    Data provided by Capital IQ, a division of Standard & Poor's. TTM = trailing 12 months.

    In the past five years sales have soared, profit margin has steadily climbed, and return on equity has more than doubled. That's the kind of performance CEOs dream about.

    Hurd deserves an immense amount of credit for those gains. His predecessor, Carly Fiorina, focused her energy on engineering a $25 billion deal to buy rival Compaq. The acquisition pushed HP further into the commoditized personal computer space, where intense competition from foreign rivals has pushed HP's operating margins down below 5%. HP's not alone in its struggles; rival Dell (Nasdaq: DELL) can barely even keep its head above the water. Dell's operating margin selling computers to consumers stands at less than 1%.

    Hurd saw the folly of chasing computer prices to the bottom and emulated a light version of the IBM (NYSE: IBM) model. In 2008, he bought services firm EDS to bundle consulting and systems integration services with its hardware sales. Since then, HP's services revenue has risen to become the second-largest segment of the company. There's little doubt today that the EDS acquisition was a home run.


    While Hurd might have steered the company in the right strategic direction, his reign at the top of HP is now over. Replacing him will be former CFO Catherine Lesjak. Don't look for Lesjak to become the next CEO, though; she's reportedly taken herself out of the running.

    What major challenges does the next CEO have to face?

    HP is at a crossroads in several strategic areas. On the consumer-facing front, it recently acquired Palm to power its mobile ambitions. While Palm developed its world-class webOS operating system, it never really caught on with either consumers or developers. Still, despite previous failures for webOS, HP is going full steam ahead with developing gadgets for its new operating system.

    HP has publicly abandoned plans to develop a Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Windows 7 tablet, and is also reportedly moving away from tablets based on Google's (Nasdaq: GOOG) Android tablet. As consumers shift to spending more money on smartphones and tablets, relying on an unproven operating system with few applications is a dangerous position for whomever takes over HP.


    On the enterprise side of things, Hurd's replacement will need to continue building services and software momentum. One of the more interesting "threats" facing HP is Cisco's (Nasdaq: CSCO) push into servers. In response, HP has beefed up its ProCurve line of networking gear. Whoever succeeds Hurd will need to decide how strongly HP wants to keep competing with the networking giant.

    Final thoughts
    I'm disappointed with the way HP broke this news. Getting rid of Hurd shortly after allegations came to light appears to be the right move, but a Friday after-market-close press release bundled with pre-released earnings is below the company -- no matter how HP spins the news.

    That said, I think HP will be fine. While the company is missing out on gains from the smartphone boom, it's also seeing strong profits in its services, software, and printing units. Even with some struggles in its consumer business in coming years, HP is well-positioned for growth.

    Mark Hurd will leave under a dark cloud, but HP is still on a better path than it was five years ago.
    755P Sprint SERO (upgraded from unlocked GSM 650 on T-Mobile)
  15. #95  
    As per all the talk on mobile...picture this: WebOS becomes an interface "overlay" on Android, much like HTC Sense, and HP focuses more strongly on hardware builds, much like HTC. Any thoughts?
  16. #96  
    Quote Originally Posted by pre-fan View Post
    As per all the talk on mobile...picture this: WebOS becomes an interface "overlay" on Android, much like HTC Sense, and HP focuses more strongly on hardware builds, much like HTC. Any thoughts?
    I don't see it happening but that would really make a lot of sense. Moreso than having to struggle for developer and end user support in a market with such clearly drawn battle lines.
  17. #97  
    WebDroid
    What if HP took the best from WebOS and combined it with Android that would be a real winner.

    But it's not going to happen and WebOS is going to keep losing market share.
  18. #98  
    Quote Originally Posted by nappy View Post
    I don't see it happening but that would really make a lot of sense. Moreso than having to struggle for developer and end user support in a market with such clearly drawn battle lines.
    Exactly. And HP does build good hardware. But I'm with you - don't think it'll happen.

    On the flip-side, if HP would license WebOS to HTC and we could see it on the same hardware as the EVO 4G - that would be epic!
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