Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1.    #1  
    I'd like to see a reinvention of the standalone GPS. Give it the class hardware we enjoy on things like the Garmin Colorado 400t, Delorme PN-60 and the almost forgotten Magellan Triton 2000 but add a huge cache storage, wi-fi/mobile, decent camera and a WebOS front end with some nifty network enabled apps. Don't cheap out on the antenna either. Love the Hiker as well as the Driver, Boater and Private Pilot. Resist compromise. Give the establishment and their overpriced map monopoly a jolt. As it stands now they're in the same technology era as the TX and iPAQ with their PC symbiosis, cable syncronization and buggy map editing software.
  2. #2  
    Standalone GPS is a rapidly-shrinking market, limited primarily to sailing, flight, and some professional drivers. Even Garmin, powerhouse of the GPS industry, has said that the future for the common stand-alone GPS device is not bright, and has focused on its high-profit integrated solutions. HP/Palm would be wasting money on any such product.
  3. #3  
    I don't think even a stand alone GPS device that depends on Verizon will be able to access GPS without loading Verizon Navigator first.
    Palm m130 > Verizon Trēo 650 > Verizon Trēo 755p > Verizon Palm Prē Plus > TouchPad > Verizon Palm Prē 2
    ~ The Future's Just Not What it Used To Be ~
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamKillerJKFFL View Post
    I'd like to see a reinvention of the standalone GPS. Give it the class hardware we enjoy on things like the Garmin Colorado 400t, Delorme PN-60 and the almost forgotten Magellan Triton 2000 but add a huge cache storage, wi-fi/mobile, decent camera and a WebOS front end with some nifty network enabled apps. Don't cheap out on the antenna either. Love the Hiker as well as the Driver, Boater and Private Pilot. Resist compromise. Give the establishment and their overpriced map monopoly a jolt. As it stands now they're in the same technology era as the TX and iPAQ with their PC symbiosis, cable syncronization and buggy map editing software.
    Growth of this market is flat and dead. If PNDs were such a hot market, HP would have already been in it.
  5. #5  
    I bought a GPS just about 2yrs ago and when I got the Pre, well... let's just say that I wish I would have known how much I could have really waited.
  6.    #6  
    Sorry, smartpones don't really do as good a job as a dedicated GPS. Same goes for GPS being a PDA. You people talk about money and current trends but I'm trying open a discussion to take that market from a different angle innovate in it and maybe recharge it with some common tech. Don't bring your day trader charts and numbers to my brainstorm.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by MilenkoD View Post
    Growth of this market is flat and dead. If PNDs were such a hot market, HP would have already been in it.
    HP has had several navigation devices.


    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...qL._SS400_.jpg
    Last edited by barrysanders20; 07/03/2010 at 10:43 AM.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamKillerJKFFL View Post
    Sorry, smartpones don't really do as good a job as a dedicated GPS. Same goes for GPS being a PDA. You people talk about money and current trends but I'm trying open a discussion to take that market from a different angle innovate in it and maybe recharge it with some common tech. Don't bring your day trader charts and numbers to my brainstorm.
    I do agree smartphones depend on internet connection to be functional. What i think palm and hp should do though is use create a partnership with garmin to produce a garmin gps powered smartphone so that the smartphone can also act as a stand alone gps. I put garmin at the very top of the list as far as gps accuracy and quality

    A garmin app and garmin gps chip.
  9. #9  
    I think the gps market is shrinking, which is why garmin just launched their first android phone.

    I prefer my garmin, but I don't want to see palm distracted by that...
  10. #10  
    Just caught the commercial tonight the first Garmin GPS/Phone with Android. Looks pretty cool. T Mobile I think.
  11.    #11  
    I saw a blurb about this a while back and I still can't tell what the NuviFone does that some existing Androids don't already do. Looks like just another marketing slant using a branded UI and some strategic partnerships (basically a Web Portal). You'd think Garmin would add some kind of tangible innovation to the mix. It's obviously for turn-by-turn navigation in an urban environment and probably works fine for that just like the others do.
    Last edited by TeamKillerJKFFL; 07/05/2010 at 12:06 AM.
  12. #12  
    What else would you like to see a stand-alone GPS do? I've seen what they can do in the air -- I fly a plane with a G1000 system, and one of the other planes in the fleet just got a Synthetic Vision upgrade a few months ago. They do some great things, but the memory requirements are enormous.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by barrysanders20 View Post
    HP has had several navigation devices.
    Oh...well I guess that was a hot segment in 2006.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Blank View Post
    What else would you like to see a stand-alone GPS do?
    Start with a device like a Magellan Triton 2000. Anything similar will do though.
    • 400MHz ARM processor
    • Manufacturer's UI Currently runs on top of WindowsCE
    • Audio and video capture with media geotagging
    • Electronic compass (tri-axis)
    • Barometric sensor
    • Waterproof to IPX7

    It has a touchscreen interface but also has hardware buttons to allow you to get to information and commonly used functions quickly. This is important for people like me who use these off road (Jeep, Camping, Motorcycle, etc.) and don't want to scratch the screen with grit and don't want to fumble with or drop a stylus in the sand. With the exception of the better quality GPS receiver chip-set, antenna and GPS-specific hardware buttons it's not a far leap away from a PDA form factor especially if you add wireless.

    Idea #1 - Utilize a GPS-centric build of WebOS:
    I believe there's an opportunity for a card UI metaphor to replace the clunky page views that a lot of people have to fudge with on every single handheld out there. Garmin and Magellan have never really understood modality in the UI context and continue to show it in even their latest devices. They're just unreasonable to deal with sometimes to the point you'd think NONE of the design team had ever actually used a GPS or a map in the field before much less let a focus group get within 10ft of the device.

    WebOS is highly customizable. Even the handhelds have a ton of real-time data to query off of so if you add in the idea of UI patches (Official/Homebrew) there's a potential for "cool" there.

    WebOS lends itself well to coupling with task-specific hardware controls so no big deal there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Blank View Post
    They do some great things, but the memory requirements are enormous.
    Agreed and that will never really go away. There are definitely options out there and some considerations to make about cache management of all these data sets. Here are a couple; One we're all familiar with followed by another that is rightly making it's way towards the forefront but really struggling to do so in a useful way.

    Vector Data:
    This data though compressible, can take on all kinds of forms depending on your intended use. Most people want to see roads, gas stations, hotels, etc. Some people want topographical detail, elevation, trails, other points of interest or proprietary data. It could be used for professional fieldwork to locate things like underground gas lines and reservoirs and a whole host of others things.

    Raster Imagery:
    Satellite views, weather views, views based on maps like topo quads or any other proprietary data. Like vector data it could be used for professional fieldwork to locate things like underground gas lines and reservoirs and a whole host of others things, blah, blah, blah.


    Idea #2 - Apply Synergy Method [sci-fi sound effect here]:
    Currently there seems to be some disconnect with how these two types of data are applied and used on current devices without some very specialized approaches (Hacking). I believe there's an opportunity here to access and display this information using a "Synergy"-like approach. Basically allow data from various sources to interact. You could overlay a selection of vector data on top of a satellite view or filter proprietary data in and out with real-time field data. You could do this from the cloud or from a local cache if you're in a remote area.

    I also believe there is an opportunity for user created content (overlays, maps, apps, etc.) with a system like this. Vast amounts of it given the right tools. This is one of the things I don't like about other mobile platforms. They're such heavy consumer devices and aren't open to even the option of content creation. Sometimes you have to resort to a specialized approach (Hack!). Historically this relegates them to the category of "gadget" and then to the trash can (or Craig's List) prematurely when the manufacturer decides to switch focus even slightly.

    Most of all I believe their use and potential in various situations and environments and wish to see them evolve on a consumer as well as professional level. It would be nice if that evolution was caught up with and somewhat paralleled with other mobile platforms. A lot of that has to do with the UI, I'm a big fan of the way Palm has approached it and I'm a big fan of how that ties directly with task management on the back-end of the system. There just has to be a little better hardware to back that up to get anything more than the trivial applications we see with things like Tom-Tom and Andriod. They're also CPU hogs and battery killers on a mobile phone not to mention inaccurate.
    Last edited by TeamKillerJKFFL; 07/05/2010 at 10:27 PM.
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamKillerJKFFL View Post
    I saw a blurb about this a while back and I still can't tell what the NuviFone does that some existing Androids don't already do. Looks like just another marketing slant using a branded UI and some strategic partnerships (basically a Web Portal). You'd think Garmin would add some kind of tangible innovation to the mix. It's obviously for turn-by-turn navigation in an urban environment and probably works fine for that just like the others do.
    it runs the full garmin gps software instead of the very crappy Nav app offered by the carriers. Huge difference in functionality.

Posting Permissions