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  1.    #1  
    Hi all, I just found this. It is quite informative. Take care, Jay

    Sunday London Times: HP Hurricane: A formidable competitor ?

    HP Hurricane: A formidable competitor ? 

    Rumor has it that the Windows 7-based HP Slate tablet PC is dead, but that HP has plans to leverage its purchase of Palm to develop a new WebOS-based tablet currently code named the “Hurricane”.

    It appears that HP is beginning to understand that the iPad is a unique device and its not about taking a notebook and making it into a flat, touch-screen computer.

    There are avariety of tablet-like computing devices in the works. But, assuming that the hardware form factor is similar to the deceased HP Slate, but with WebOS as the platform Hurricane could be a formidable competitor for the Apple iPad. Here are five reasons explaining why that is the case.

    1. Adobe Flash.

    While Apple continues its public jihad against Adobe Flash other platforms such as Android and WebOS are working with Adobe to develop Flash software compatible with their mobile platforms. HTML5 may be the future, but there is no denying that Adobe Flash is a ubiquitous standard regardless of any flaws it might have, real or perceived.

    2. Dual Cameras.

    A tablet device may be a tad bulky or cumbersome to use for taking snapshots, but the option would certainly come in handy.

    Granted, I can take a picture with my smart-phone instead and through some convoluted combination of tasks manage to get them to the iPad so I can draw moustaches on the photos with Adobe Ideas !

    More importantly for mobile business professionals, a front-facing camera allows the tablet to be used for Skype video calls, and other face-to-face video conferencing solutions.

    3. Expandability.

    The iPad is intentionally a closed environment. The lack of USB ports or SD memory card slots fits with the basic culture of the iPad as a Web-enabled mobile media platform, but business professionals need to be able to simply plug in a USB thumb drive and read or copy files.

    While not explicitly prescribed, the iPad camera connection kit apparently offers an alternative to enable some USB capabilities, but an HP Hurricane with a USB port and/or SD memory card slot would be a huge advantage.

    4. Distribution channels.

    Then we get down to the nitty gritty. Forget the features of the hardware or the capabilities of the platform. An HP Hurricane tablet can crush an Apple iPad just by virtue of HP’s massive global enterprise distribution channels. HP has an existing vendor relationship with most major corporations. As long as HP can demonstrate the benefits and value of the Hurricane tablet it will be able to leverage those relationships to distribute the device en masse.

    5. HP brand.

    Apple has its dedicated and loyal following. I wouldn’t dare imply that HP has anywhere near the dedication from its customers. But, as the largest computer manufacturer in the world it does have a respected reputation--especially in the business world where Apple often struggles.

    I think it was a wise decision by HP to shift gears from the Windows 7-based Slate to the WebOS-based Hurricane. The tablet is a culture shift, not just a new form factor for HP.

    HP is in a strong position, though, to combine its brand prowess and understanding of the needs of mobile business professionals, with the WebOS platform, and lessons learned from the iPad, and create a tablet device capable of challenging the iPad, and with an edge on the iPad when it comes to the business professional audience.
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    I like this guys style!lol, this speaks the truth, but is based on one pretty big assumption, that the Hurricane will basically be a Slate with webOS...which would be awesome, with an OS that can run on a 500MHz phone, to a 1.6GHz Atom....yes please, but whether this will actually materialism as the case, or if HP churn out something less than the slate is yet to be seen!!
  3.    #3  
    Hiya,

    For what ever my opinion is worth, I think that Palm/HP will be able to do wonders with webOS, in the next gen phone and a "slate".

    1. Because it is an amazing platform.

    2. Because Palm was at a terrible financial disadvantage, which it no longer is. It is not just a matter of HP pumping money into it to prop it up. It is another that HP, is scraping its own "slate" in favor of one run with webOS.

    It does help that webOS would be much easier on batteries than Win 7, in addition Win 7 took up too much space on the "slate", as it such a large program. From what I read, those are the the major 2 problems with HP's Win 7 "slate".

    I would think that MS had to write additions to Win 7 for a slate type usage, making it even more cumbersome.

    Take care, jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
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    #4  
    Like most people here i am very very excited about the hurricane, coz if HP has to get it into the market it has to have some real functional specific apps for a tablet to succeed against the Ipad which we lack in the app store right now.

    So they will accelerate the process of creating/requesting those apps for WebOS like

    Book store apps, skype for video chat and not to mention a on screen keyboard.

    Simple put i have some very high expectations for (the aptly named ) HURRICANE
  5.    #5  
    HI all,

    Since HP made the offer for Palm, I have stated in numerous threads on Pre Central, that I am sure there will be lots of apps, in no time at all.

    1. Palm was already working with Game Loft and others, showing how easy and fast it is to port games, to the webOS platform. I am not a programmer, but I would think that 3D games have to be some of the most complex apps, for any platform. If they were ported in as little as week, think how many apps will be ported.

    2. Palm now will have access to lots of $, to help build up the platform. Besides Palm writing apps, there is also the following scenario. Palm helps port apps for free. In all that I have read, no where did I read that Palm was billing Game Loft,t for it's time and expertize in HELPING porting their games. It is Palm's best interest NOT to charge at this time for such help.

    3. We know we hit a raw nerve, when Apple a few weeks ago, tried to restrict what computer languages are used in apps, (so that it would be hard to port them to webOS). The DOJ nosing around must have scared Jobs and he backed off of it.

    4. HP's clout alone will make companies that were on the sidelines, jump in. After all, HP has marketing expertize and very, very deep pockets! Those that didn't want to write apps or port apps to webOS are now interested.

    5. In the past few weeks, we are getting about 150 NEW apps per week. 2 months ago it was about 1/3 of that! We are now reaching Critical Mass, where companies will write apps, b/c there are a lot of apps already written.

    take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  6. #6  
    3. We know we hit a raw nerve, when Apple a few weeks ago, tried to restrict what computer languages are used in apps, (so that it would be hard to port them to webOS). The DOJ nosing around must have scared Jobs and he backed off of it.
    he did?

    Adobe Hits Back at Apple Over Flash Ban in Ad Campaign | Digital Media Wire
    "When there is no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth"


    PM me your questions, If I cant find an answer, I'll show you who can.
  7.    #7  
    HI,

    Yes apple backed off and is allowing the same computer languages for apps, to be written in as always. He runs Apple like the Old time mining company town. You can either do it his way or the highway. I am glad he got swatted down.

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  8. #8  
    By the way, this article isn't from the London Sunday Times; this is a Sri Lankan publication.
  9. #9  
    this is a repeat of an article that ran in the usa a couple of weeks ago, fyi...
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by ilovedessert View Post
    HI,

    Yes apple backed off and is allowing the same computer languages for apps, to be written in as always. He runs Apple like the Old time mining company town. You can either do it his way or the highway. I am glad he got swatted down.

    Take care, Jay
    could you link to your source of this news?

    Your saying this is to be removed from TOU?

    "Applications must be originally written in Objective-C, C, C++, or JavaScript as executed by the iPhone OS WebKit engine, and only code written in C, C++, and Objective-C may compile and directly link against the Documented APIs (e.g., Applications that link to Documented APIs through an intermediary translation or compatibility layer or tool are prohibited)."
    I have not found any reference to this online, I would suspect that if Apple was changing its mind on this, there would be many breaking news stories on multiple tech sites....


    he doesn't sound like he's backed off of anything, I think you may be wrong on that one.....
    Last edited by mrloserpunk; 05/16/2010 at 11:47 AM.
    "When there is no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth"


    PM me your questions, If I cant find an answer, I'll show you who can.
  11. #11  
    there is an app being uilt (rumored) that will allow some types of flash content (advertising) to play. There is no change in banning flash applications and apps compiled with adobe tools including flash
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    there is an app being uilt (rumored) that will allow some types of flash content (advertising) to play. There is no change in banning flash applications and apps compiled with adobe tools including flash
    ok, but the issue is still there, tou still there and steve jobs still there....looking over every users shoulder to enforce his "morality"

    if that rumor is true, it does nothing to change the situation....IMHO of course....


    WOW sorry for the thread jack.... I will own a HP Hurricane someday... or i will get webos to boot on my touchsmart
    "When there is no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth"


    PM me your questions, If I cant find an answer, I'll show you who can.
  13. #13  
    I have a bad feeling that hpalm will try and recreate apples success, and not have a stylus. A stylus is horribe when it comes to navigating through the ui, but is outstanding for somethings. Students are a huge market, who are always looking for a laptop, or a device to take notes with. A stylus gives them that. Try taking notes in math, calculus, or even physics with a software, or even a physical keyboard. It doesn't work. Also having a stylus would mean you could get a version of photoshop ported.

    as much as I love the idea of a webos tablet, I won't br able to justify spending 500 dollars on it.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by mrloserpunk View Post
    could you link to your source of this news?

    Your saying this is to be removed from TOU?


    I have not found any reference to this online, I would suspect that if Apple was changing its mind on this, there would be many breaking news stories on multiple tech sites....


    he doesn't sound like he's backed off of anything, I think you may be wrong on that one.....
    Hi, I have highlighted the paragraphs that apply to your question. The link for the article is also below.

    Please read the article in it's entirety and then reread the highlighted paragraphs. Then you will understand what I mean. Now that you know what to look fo,r you will find a number of articles saying the same thing.

    Apple backed down. Unlike the reporter, I do think Apple is using an unfair advantage. After all, he controls the hardware, the content, the sales and now with what computer language, it is written in.

    In another article, that I know was posted to this site, a number of programmers said it was too expensive to do it Jobs way. I do not know if that is true per say or if these firms, would have to bring in other people who wite in the computer language, that Jobs wants to use.

    However, as requiring it for the sole reason, to prevent porting into other platforms which is anticompetitive. In fact, this was the only article I have read that actually agrees with Apple. What is Jobs afraid of, having to compete with a level playing field?

    Take care, Jay

    This is the main quote I am referring to, but again read it in it's context please:

    With the Feds reportedly only "days away" from launching a full-scale antitrust inquiry, Apple is reportedly tweaking its iPhone and iPad developer program to dodge a probe into its business practices.

    Feds Threaten Apple's Control of iPhone and iPad

    By David Coursey, PC World


    With the Feds reportedly only "days away" from launching a full-scale antitrust inquiry, Apple is reportedly tweaking its iPhone and iPad developer program to dodge a probe into its business practices. At issue may be Apple's ability to tightly control the mobile platforms it has invented.

    For all the noise Steve Jobs has made about the technical weaknesses of Adobe Flash, the fight is really about Apple's ability to control the software that runs on its platforms. Jobs wants to protect the iPad and iPhone from being watered down by generic, cross-platform mobile applications, including those based on Flash.

    Jobs has done this through recent changes to Apple's developer agreement that have the effect of preventing applications built for his company's devices from running on other companies' mobile devices.

    Now, investigators are reportedly ready to look at whether the agreement is anticompetitive and violates federal law. I wish they'd back off, and I think customers will be better for it if they did.

    Apple wants its developers to build apps that differentiate its products from all others, incorporating whatever magic Apple chooses to build into them. Apple wants apps that highlight its platforms' strengths and disguise their weaknesses.

    Cross-platform applications, such as those created with Adobe's new CS5, might be easier for developers to build and their efforts could be leveraged across Apple, Google, Research In Motion, and Microsoft mobile devices.

    In response, Apple changed its developer agreement to require iPad/iPhone apps to be created using only Apple's own tools. Further, Apple said it would refuse access to the Apps Store for Adobe Flash-based applications, effectively barring them from customers using Apple's hardware.

    Non-Apple-Approved Apps
    Again, the issue isn't Flash, per se, but the ability of developers to use Adobe CS5 to build a single Flash-based application that can run on all the most popular mobile devices.

    Those apps, however, might be limited to a set of most-common cross-platform features, causing them to look and behave the same on all platforms that supported them. This could destroy the aura of exclusivity that Apple enjoys, as well as the total control it today enjoys over its platforms.

    In short, if you're Steve Jobs and Apple, cross-platform applications are a headache to be avoided at all cost, except perhaps, having to fight government regulators in court.

    Keeping Apple Honest

    My take: It is easy to paint Steve Jobs as the evil menace here. It's easy to say Apple gets away with control tactics that Microsoft never tried, even in its most dominating moments. And those things may be true.

    But, it is also true that forcing developers to build Apple-specific applications is the best way for Apple to move its platform forward. It allows Apple to release new technologies, decide how they will be used and by whom, and limit the ability of those same apps to appear on other companies' devices.

    I don't see anything wrong with that.

    As the market grows, other platforms will--if they give customers value--see their application libraries and developer communities grow. I am not sure Google, Microsoft, et al, could ever be as exclusive (and excluding) as Apple, but it's possible.

    Or maybe having applications that run across multiple devices will become a big win for customers and Apple will be forced to relent, as it is already doing by adding multitasking features to the next version of iPhone OS.

    Apple has done an excellent job of giving customers what they want. While Apple dominates mobile devices today, its large, well-heeled competitors will gain strength over time. Especially, if Apple does things to slow the innovations that customers want to buy.

    Android, Windows Phone 7, and BlackBerry, along with Adobe's Flash and CS5 development suite, should be enough to keep Apple honest. For now, I don't believe federal help is required.

    My advice to Apple: Stick to your guns, and your developer agreement.

    David Coursey has been writing about technology products and companies for more than 25 years. He tweets as @techinciter and posts to Facebook . He is best contacted via his Web site .
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  15.    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Smith View Post
    By the way, this article isn't from the London Sunday Times; this is a Sri Lankan publication.
    I did not know that thank you, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    this is a repeat of an article that ran in the usa a couple of weeks ago, fyi...
    I did not know that thank you, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  17.    #17  
    Note to all:



    ooooppps I forgot to provide the promised link:
    Take care, Jay

    Feds Threaten Apple's Control of iPhone and iPad

    By David Coursey, PC World

    Report: DOJ and FTC investigating Apple (Updated) | ZDNet

    With the Feds reportedly only "days away" from launching a full-scale antitrust inquiry, Apple is reportedly tweaking its iPhone and iPad developer program to dodge a probe into its business practices. At issue may be Apple's ability to tightly control the mobile platforms it has invented.

    For all the noise Steve Jobs has made about the technical weaknesses of Adobe Flash, the fight is really about Apple's ability to control the software that runs on its platforms. Jobs wants to protect the iPad and iPhone from being watered down by generic, cross-platform mobile applications, including those based on Flash.

    Jobs has done this through recent changes to Apple's developer agreement that have the effect of preventing applications built for his company's devices from running on other companies' mobile devices.

    Now, investigators are reportedly ready to look at whether the agreement is anticompetitive and violates federal law. I wish they'd back off, and I think customers will be better for it if they did.

    Apple wants its developers to build apps that differentiate its products from all others, incorporating whatever magic Apple chooses to build into them. Apple wants apps that highlight its platforms' strengths and disguise their weaknesses.

    Cross-platform applications, such as those created with Adobe's new CS5, might be easier for developers to build and their efforts could be leveraged across Apple, Google, Research In Motion, and Microsoft mobile devices.

    In response, Apple changed its developer agreement to require iPad/iPhone apps to be created using only Apple's own tools. Further, Apple said it would refuse access to the Apps Store for Adobe Flash-based applications, effectively barring them from customers using Apple's hardware.

    Non-Apple-Approved Apps
    Again, the issue isn't Flash, per se, but the ability of developers to use Adobe CS5 to build a single Flash-based application that can run on all the most popular mobile devices.

    Those apps, however, might be limited to a set of most-common cross-platform features, causing them to look and behave the same on all platforms that supported them. This could destroy the aura of exclusivity that Apple enjoys, as well as the total control it today enjoys over its platforms.

    In short, if you're Steve Jobs and Apple, cross-platform applications are a headache to be avoided at all cost, except perhaps, having to fight government regulators in court.

    Keeping Apple Honest

    My take: It is easy to paint Steve Jobs as the evil menace here. It's easy to say Apple gets away with control tactics that Microsoft never tried, even in its most dominating moments. And those things may be true.

    But, it is also true that forcing developers to build Apple-specific applications is the best way for Apple to move its platform forward. It allows Apple to release new technologies, decide how they will be used and by whom, and limit the ability of those same apps to appear on other companies' devices.

    I don't see anything wrong with that.

    As the market grows, other platforms will--if they give customers value--see their application libraries and developer communities grow. I am not sure Google, Microsoft, et al, could ever be as exclusive (and excluding) as Apple, but it's possible.

    Or maybe having applications that run across multiple devices will become a big win for customers and Apple will be forced to relent, as it is already doing by adding multitasking features to the next version of iPhone OS.

    Apple has done an excellent job of giving customers what they want. While Apple dominates mobile devices today, its large, well-heeled competitors will gain strength over time. Especially, if Apple does things to slow the innovations that customers want to buy.

    Android, Windows Phone 7, and BlackBerry, along with Adobe's Flash and CS5 development suite, should be enough to keep Apple honest. For now, I don't believe federal help is required.

    My advice to Apple: Stick to your guns, and your developer agreement.

    David Coursey has been writing about technology products and companies for more than 25 years. He tweets as @techinciter and posts to Facebook . He is best contacted via his Web site .
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  18. #18  
    the whole multyplat apps are bad is bs. If an app doesn't meet apples standards its not going in the app catalogue. If an exclusive isn't good enough, it won't make it, if a muktiplat isn't good enough it won't make it. Simple as 1.2.3...
  19.    #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by nimer55 View Post
    the whole multyplat apps are bad is bs. If an app doesn't meet apples standards its not going in the app catalogue. If an exclusive isn't good enough, it won't make it, if a muktiplat isn't good enough it won't make it. Simple as 1.2.3...
    Jobs is a 3 child he wants it his way and wants it his way, NOW!
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  20. #20  
    I appreciate the read, and thanks for trying to make it more clear, but I guess I don't see enough meat for me to believe apple is changing its tune on anything. The article does a great job of discussing the effects and lining up the 2 sides, but as far as Apple changing the TOU... it gives no source or info on the changes, just reportedly. So if its wrong, there is no foul... I guess time will tell....
    "When there is no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth"


    PM me your questions, If I cant find an answer, I'll show you who can.

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