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  1. #21  
    A phone being Triband has nothing to do with the cost of airtime and/or SMS messages.

    1900 Mhz is only used in the US and Canada

    The 900/1800 Treo is the one to buy if you plan to use your phone anywhere in the world and also the US and/or Canada. Believe me your phone will work everywhere, ofcourse subject to there being GSM cellphoen coverage there, which is pretty much most of the world.

    You could maybe mail order your Treo from the US/Canada to be delivered to Australia. YOu could also have some friend/relative buy it for you in the US/Canada and then send it to you in Australia. I personally used that method to get my Treo 270 from the US (I live in India). By the way I paid US $599 for my Treo 270 plus US $12 shipping & handling.

    Sanjay
  2. #22  
    Originally posted by Sanjay
    A phone being Triband has nothing to do with the cost of airtime and/or SMS messages.

    1900 Mhz is only used in the US and Canada

    The 900/1800 Treo is the one to buy if you plan to use your phone anywhere in the world and also the US and/or Canada. Believe me your phone will work everywhere, ofcourse subject to there being GSM cellphoen coverage there, which is pretty much most of the world.

    Sanjay
    The 900/1800 Treo will not work in the US, since the US only uses 1900 MHz for GSM. If you get a 900/1900 Treo, then you have a world phone, as it will work in the US and everywhere else that has GSM (granted if you go to a place that has only 1800 MHz, it won't work, but I have yet to find a country (outside of the US and Canada) that has GSM that doesn't support 900 MHz).
    Last edited by Insp_Gadget; 12/24/2002 at 04:52 PM.
    --Inspector Gadget

    "Go Go Gadget Pre!!"
    Palm Pre on Sprint

    Palm V--> Palm IIIc--> Visor Prism--> Visor Phone--> Treo 270--> Treo 600--> Treo 650-->
    Treo 700wx--> HTC Touch Diamond--> Palm Pre & HTC EVO 4G.
  3. #23  
    >The only thing to remember is to enter a plus sign (+) in front of numbers you are calling (necessary for out of area calls) to get international calls through (no fooling with 01 or 011 or 001). I went ahead and fixed up a number of speed dials and phone book entries with plus signs to save myself any trouble. Works like a charm.
    <

    Yet, when I tried to dial Voicestream's 203 number for voicemail, it did not work. I have no idea why. Every other number worked as you said, +1 and off you go.

    I have used my phone seamlessly in England, France and Italy, no problems. Haven't had a chance to test elsewhere yet.


    >(I have VS and I only pay ~75 cents per min for calls back to the US I'm grandfathered into an old plan). <

    Good plan, but without grandfathering, my VS (now TMobile) charges were 99 cents a minute. That seemed fair for international roaming.
  4. #24  
    Hi there,

    I just came back yesterday from a weeklong trip in Germany, and had a generally fine experience with my Treo 180.

    Some background:
    - I used my (native USA) T-Mobile SIM.
    - I don't have GPRS activated, but I have the update.

    I didn't connect via CSD... just sent and received phone calls and text messages.

    I constantly had four bars (full strength signal) on my Treo, except sometimes when indoors in very thick-walled (wood, metal) buildings, e.g., kickass pubs

    Phone reception was very good (about same quality as here in San Francisco, which is also pretty strong), and I even was able to receive caller ID for most calls coming in. I also really appreciated the ability to access my voicemail remotely (not using my cell phone) by dialing 415-320-9999 (my phone number is 415-320-xxxx, so this is easy to remember).

    SMS'ing was mostly seamless, although I had a couple of minor problems. One morning I was unable to send messages to e-mail addresses, and also I had problems replying to some German-based messages which had a return-address of "[some numbers]@rply.net". Otherwise, all SMS (at least ones sent to me by friends in Europe) were received usually within 5 seconds or less!

    What's unknown so far is the billing situation. Will I be billed for voicemails I received while overseas? For received text messages? For calls I made but for which no one picked up? (e.g., 3-4 rings) How will all of this be itemized on my bill? And lastly, how long will this take for all of it to show up on my bill?

    I'll keep you posted when I know more

    In the meantime, I can strongly recommend TWT (Traveling With Treo)! It made my vacation much, much more fun because I was able to more easily connect with friends and not have to worry about checking in at a pay phone every hour to learn of new plans, etc.
  5. sck18's Avatar
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    #25  
    I'm still confused about GPRS while traveling. T-Mobile's oh-so-useful website lists the "partner" that supplies wireless internet in the U.K. as "T-mobile UK." duh...

    Unfortunately they operate at 1800 Mhz, outside the range of my little American-bought treo. Does this mean that I can/cannot use GPRS in London? Or just that whomever I roam with can charge me as much as they like?

    Also, from a technical point of view, has anyone successfully USED t-mobile internet in England? How do you connect (if it's as easy as going to prefs > network > t-mobile internet > connect, I'd be surprised) to roaming partners' internet services.

    I COULD have just called up t-mobile's customer service line with this info, but I figured I wanted a RIGHT answer :-)

    Thanks in advance,
    --Steve
  6. #26  
    Have roamed in Europe OK but that was pre-GPRS with T-Mobile. Is GPRS roaming also OK in Europe?
  7. sck18's Avatar
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    #27  
    Thought I'd report on my experience last week -

    I'm on T-Mobile (with a GPRS plan added and the upgrade succesfully installed) using a Treo 270.

    After adding Worldclass roaming service to my plan (the OLD northeast neighborhood plan), I went on vacation to England - mostly London, but also Stonehenge and Oxford. Upon arriving, guess what - the phone wouldn't work. I tried automatically searching for a network, manually selecting either Vodaphone or Orange, etc...and nothing helped. Testing a local Vodaphone SIM chip in my treo was successful, implying that something was wrong with my SIM.

    After hurriedly talking to t-mobile back in the US using an international calling card, I discovered that I had been provisioned for national roaming, not international roaming. Sigh.

    They provisioned me, and it worked later that afternoon. I avoided making too many calls, since $0.99 a minute is still rather hefty. I was unable to make GPRS work, although that would be expected, given that the only WorldClass partner listed for the United Kingdom on t-mobiles international roaming services website is T-Mobile UK, which operates on 1800 MHZ, and is thus inaccessible to my treo.

    I DID however, depend almost completely on text messages, for correspondance with Londoners and Americans back home. I obviously haven't seen the bill yet, but I'm prepared to complain to t-mobile that these should all come out of my 500 bucket, as they are clearly texts and not calls. ( http://www.t-mobile.com/international/coverage.asp ).

    Good luck to all!

    P.S. - Oh, and coverage was unbelievable. I wanted to take all of the cell towers home with me, but customs probably wouldn't be too happy with that :-)
  8. #28  
    Here is an update on this subject:

    I just recently used SMS overseas (SE Asia) and I got charged 35 cents for every outgoing SMS message. I called to see if this was accurate and the CSR said it was. Again, I asked to see this policy and the rep told me to go into a store and view the policy. I asked her if it was on the website and the CSR said it wasn't. After a few minutes on T-Mobile's website, I found this:

    "In addition, while traveling outside the US, you can send text messages for just 35 per message. Receiving messages is free."

    At least they put it on their website, though I was never notified.
  9. #29  
    I just got back from a week in Spain. I am with AT&T, and all I did was to tell them I was going to Spain, and that was it. The phone worked absolutely flawlessly. I believe the call charge was $1.29 per minute, but it could be less. For those who call you they just dial your regular number. If you are calling to the states, remember to first dial the country code of 001 then the area code and number. THe SMS was also flawless and I might add virtually instant. I beliEve I was charged ten cents per SMS message. I could not have been happier with the service.
  10. #30  
    Originally posted by robertruelan
    Here is an update on this subject:

    I just recently used SMS overseas (SE Asia) and I got charged 35 cents for every outgoing SMS message. I called to see if this was accurate and the CSR said it was. Again, I asked to see this policy and the rep told me to go into a store and view the policy. I asked her if it was on the website and the CSR said it wasn't. After a few minutes on T-Mobile's website, I found this:

    "In addition, while traveling outside the US, you can send text messages for just 35 per message. Receiving messages is free."

    At least they put it on their website, though I was never notified.
    robert,

    you were using your t-mo service and they still cahrged you the 35 cents?

    that sucks.
    Felipe
    On the road to 5,000 posts
    Life is what happens between Firmware releases.
  11. #31  
    Yeah I was still using T-Mobile, guess it teaches me to use a pre-paid SIM next time. I would have used a pre-paid one, if I knew I was going to incur the 35 cents per outgoing.

    Also, I wasn't sure how to get onto AIM with a prepaid SIM, but I was just basically too lazy to find out.
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