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  1.    #1  
    Another crazy story: Facebook Buying Palm???

    Or is it so crazy?

    Hi all, I just found this, it is food for thought and here it is also food for discussion. (Face Palm, Face slap indeed)!

    I have also posted the GigaOm article, refereed in the first article.

    Take care, Jay

    Facebook + Palm = FacePalm?
    By David Heath
    Saturday, 24 April 2010 14:51

    iTWire - Facebook + Palm = FacePalm?

    It started as a joke, but the merits of a Facebook buyout of Palm are starting to gather some weight.

    We reported a couple of weeks ago that Palm was putting itself up for sale and outlined a number of potential buyers. Of the leading contenders, it would seem that HTC has gone by the wayside and Lenovo is an improbable bidder.

    Shortly after the sale became public, jokes started circulating that Facebook was a potential bidder in order to make the obvious name FacePalm.

    The guys over at GigaOm have taken this theme and run a little further with it, suggesting that there might actually be some synergy in such a merger. They point out that Facebook's plan to make the entire web social is dependent upon drawing together information from many sources.

    At the Facebook F8 conference (winding up as I write) CEO Mark Zuckerberg presented the keynote where he was reported:

    The bigger announcement was what Facebook calls the 'Open Graph,' and how Facebook plans to connect disparate corners of the Web that other social sites are building. "Yelp is mapping out the part of the graph that relates to small businesses. Pandora is mapping out the part of the graph that relates to music," Zuckerberg said. "If we can take these separate maps of the graph and pull them all together, then we can create a Web that's smarter, more social, more personalized, and more semantically aware."

    "These connections aren't just happening on Facebook, they're happening all over the Web, and today with the Open Graph we're bringing all these things together," Zuckerberg said.

    Would Palm's phone platform fit into this scenario?


    How interesting would it be if Facebook owned the phone platform that permitted both mobile access to Facebook AND the ability to add the mere fact of a call between two subscribers to their online profiles?

    We already have the Synergy feature of Palm's WebOS which permits the integration of contact information from a large variety of sources (including Facebook) which would form a very useful means of making Facebook the hub of a subscriber's contact world.

    In addition, Zuckerberg announced at F8 the fact that Facebook will be adopting OAuth the open authentication protocol which, "allows a user to grant a third party site access to their information stored with another service provider, without sharing their access permissions or the full extent of their data."

    So, does this mean that Facebook would actually enter into a deal like this? Perhaps we should hear from Nick O'Neill, Facebook platform developer and host of the All Facebook blog.

    "I've been discussing with numerous developers the possibility of a Facebook phone for years now. If you've been building on the Facebook Platform, it's in your best interest that Facebook continues to succeed. Many developers, and myself included, see Apple as a major threat. The company has managed to build a platform of more than 80 million users, all running the Apple mobile operating system."

    Öand that final statement opens up a whole new can of worms: under what circumstances should we consider Apple and Facebook to be competitors?

    May we live in interesting times.

    Why Nobody Wants Palm ó Except Maybe Facebook
    By Kevin C. Tofel

    Why Nobody Wants Palm ó Except Maybe Facebook

    Another day and another potential buyer of Palm has been crossed off the list ó HTC is reportedly passing on the opportunity to purchase the troubled smartphone maker. Which means all signs are now pointing to Lenovo making a bid, especially in light of its recent decision to jump back into the smartphone market. But at this point, I donít see Lenovo ó or any other handset maker, for that matter ó spending the billion or so dollars some expect Palm would fetch, for I think itís too late for its webOS to compete against the platforms of Apple and Google.

    With application developers focusing the lionsí share of their attention on creating titles for iPhone and Android handsets, any company considering involvement with Palm faces a limited ecosystem for software as compared to larger rivals. As a former Palm Pre owner, webOS was a joy to use, but it never truly gained the attention of developers, and so without a vast library of high-quality apps to choose from, I jumped ship.

    Multitasking is good, but not enough

    To be sure, Iíve owned or used phones from every platform and can say unequivocally that Palmís webOS handsets do multitasking better than any other smartphone device, thanks to their innovative card system. But itís not enough of a differentiator; if it were, consumers would shun Appleís iPhone, which offers limited multitasking for native Apple software.

    And Lenovo has already started to build atop of the multitasking Android OS; it introduced the world to its Android-powered Lephone in February. Its decision was an easy one to understand: The operating system doesnít cost the company anything and it can leverage the growing popularity of Googleís platform in the process.

    Why not a Facebook phone?

    So given that Lenovoís already made its support for the Android platform clear, whoís left to save Palm? Maybe itís time to step outside the box and consider a less traditional option: Facebook. The webOS Synergy feature can already be used to link a Palm phone with a Facebook profile for easier contact management. In light of the social networking siteís plan to make the entire web social, thatís just the tip of the potential iceberg.

    Imagine that Facebook partners with and pays Palm to rebrand its handsets as Facebook phones. Due to ineffective marketing, consumers donít know about webOS, but they do know what Facebook is. The rebrand alone could vault Palmís handset line into the spotlight. With the right hooks between Facebook and webOS, the devices would be dedicated social networking mobile phones, the number of which is steadily increasing due to the rise in social activities on smartphones. Palm could use the huge Facebook ecosystem as a carrot to dangle in front of mobile app developers, and Facebook would gain control over a mobile platform.

    Perhaps weíve been asking the wrong question about Palm all along. Itís not which carrier does Palm need, itís which company Palm should partner with to save itself?
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  2. #2  
    Facebook doesn't have the coin to buy Palm. Way outta their league.
    The Saint
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by clintwinstead View Post
    Facebook doesn't have the coin to buy Palm. Way outta their league.
    How Much is Facebook Worth? - Forbes.com
  4. #4  
    Palm could be had for a billion probably. Why doesn't Apple just suck it up find some coin in the couch cushions and buy Palm, ten would control all these patents. I don't like it Apple would get even less open and less likely to innovate. The point being that Apple or even MS or Google have the money to snatch up Palm soley for the Patents and scrap the rest.
  5.    #5  
    I finally finished in the garden and thought I would look to see, if I could find out anything further about Palm & Facebook.

    I did find the following:

    Could Facebook Buy Palm?
    Posted by Nick O'Neill on April 23rd, 2010 8:12 PM

    Could Facebook Buy Palm?

    For the past year, Iíve been increasingly playing with the idea of Facebook building their own phone. The reason is that it has become pretty apparent that Apple is becoming a significant threat to the social networking behemoth. Then this afternoon I saw two posts suggesting that Facebook needs a mobile operating system and one suggesting Facebook could buy Palm. So could an acquisition of Palm by Facebook at this critical juncture take place?

    Financially Feasible?

    Palm is hemorrhaging cash. Burning through over $1 billion in the past year, issuing more shares just to stay afloat. According to the companyís public financial statements, general administrative expenses have been responsible for the loss. In essence the company is not operating at an optimal level and while thereís a potential to turn it around, the current executive team hasnít been doing so.

    That may be exactly the reason that Jon Rubenstein, the companyís CEO, may be forced out. Whoever ends up acquiring Palm, thereís no doubt that many employees will be shown the door within the coming months. They need to cut down on costs quickly and the best way to do that is to fire people. There is a beacon of hope for the company though: they have a positive gross margin, the only question is whether or not itís possible to operate with the available cash flow. My guess is that Palm will be forced to get much smaller before it gets bigger.

    Itís also important to note that one of Palmís largest investors is also a relatively large investor in Facebook, although itís nowhere near a controlling stake. Thereís no doubt that Facebook could scrap together just enough to purchase Palm but it would most likely require a large amount (if not all) of Facebookís existing cash.

    The Right Strategic Decision?

    Iíve been discussing with numerous developers the possibility of a Facebook phone for years now. If youíve been building on the Facebook Platform, itís in your best interest that Facebook continues to succeed. Many developers, and myself included, see Apple as a major threat. The company has managed to build a platform of more than 80 million users, all running the Apple mobile operating system.

    Facebook Represents Our Web Identity But Phones Will Be Our Wallets
    Right now Facebook is collecting information about the majority of web users and ďlocking inĒ the internet under itís control. Whether or not you agree with the strategy, itís an ambitious vision, and the company appears to be poised to succeed. While acquiring a failing mobile company could prove to be a major detractor, mobile is how most users will access the internet in the future.

    More than 100 million users access Facebook via their mobile devices right now, but on many of those mobile devices, the phones are the platforms. While some have suggested that Facebook could make their own micro-mobile platform on the most successful devices (Apple, Android, etc), they are still under the control over the mobile manufacturers.

    Thatís why weíve already seen an immense amount of tension between Facebook and Apple as Joe Hewitt has become one of the most vocal developers against Apple. Heís so angry about Appleís policies that he stopped building the Facebook iPhone application all together.

    Mark Zuckerberg Appears Focused On The Web

    Right now it appears as though Mark Zuckerberg is a strong believer in the web as the platform, essentially dismissing or at least avoiding any questions about Facebook creating a more significant mobile presence or opening some of their mobile apps. Yes, the company has 100 million mobile users, but itís also in the process of building the semantic web and that will take some time.

    In addition to having large ambitions on the web, mobile is not a core competency of Facebook. While the company builds applications for mobile devices, the company is a web company by its very nature. Thatís not to suggest the companyís existing talent couldnít manage a mobile phone company but it would require significant executive resources, something that Palm appears to currently have problems with.

    Facebookís executives are extremely busy with their existing projects so managing the development and promotion of a phone could result in resources being stretched thin.

    Palm Wants To Be Saved By Social Networking

    If you visit Palmís website, itís pretty clear that the company is marketing their latest devices as ďsocial networking toolsĒ. While I doubt it was intended to be used as a tool for attracting Facebook into the picture, it could have been a subconscious message by someone at the company. Unfortunately Palmís brand isnít great but they do have a lot of distribution deals that would prove to be valuable for any company looking to enter the mobile market.

    Mark Zuckerberg Knows How To Delegate

    The one thing that Mark Zuckerberg has become better at over time is delegating. Thatís why he brought in Sheryl Sandberg as COO as well as a number of other leading industry executives. While he still like to oversee the product development, some reports have suggested that he has begun thinking about much broader ambitions. While the Open Graph is a concept that turns the internet into the Great Wall of Facebook, the company has proven to execute on ambitious concepts in a short amount of time.

    Since the company has almost executed on its vision of developing a ďunique, Web-wide online profileĒ, why not take things a step further and purchase a mobile phone company? Do you think Facebook would benefit from purchasing Palm?

    Take care, Jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  6.    #6  
    Hi all, BTW, I just found the original article that I opened this thread with, has now been picked up by Salon.com.

    Take care, jay
    Please Support Research into Fibromyalgia, Chronic Pain and Spinal Injuries. If You Suffer from These, Consider Joining or Better Yet Forming a Support Group. No One Should Suffer from the Burden of Chronic Pain, Jay M. S. Founder, Leesburg Fibromyalgia/Resources Group
  7. cgk
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    #7  
    it's nonsense and will never happen - notice how we get one of these rumours every week like clockwork once the last "X is going to buy palm" turns out to be a lot of crap.
  8. #8  
    While it's a nice concept, it probably won't happen. Maybe by fall, palm will have the phone, and os they need to sell millions of phones on their own. The problem is the increased amount of upcoming competition. Android has finally reached it's mature state (still missing some stuff sure, but has gained alot of features, apps and momentum.), Apple has finally responded to the features they lack.(while we love web-os more, the mass-market won't miss "real multitaskings", or the other features it has missing nearly as much as they miss the 150 000 apps) Microsoft is making a comeback, and while i'm not a huge fan of the os theres a few things thats going to make sure it sells millions: It's simple, and elegant, it's got the microsoft name, and will have xbox "features." Microsoft will also throw millions behind the marketing.


    Nokia is loosing grounds, and blackberry isn't growing as fast as they use to. But blackberrys will stay cause business users rely on them, and theres no real alternative.

    It puts palm in a very, very hard situation, with next to no cash to advertise what they do better.
  9. #9  
    NEED FLASH!

    if they could get flash working already and make palm phones able to play farmville, cafe world, etc., then i could possibly see a gamechanger....

    hey, how more synergized can you get with facebook if you put facebook chat officially built in the messaging app?? tell me what more you have to synergize?

    Being the facebook phone is a BIG differentiating factor in the smartphone world.
  10. #10  
    Well... That would be interesting. At least we know that Palm would still exist somewhat independently since I doubt Facebook would want to be involved with designing hardware and software. I'm sure they would require complete integration into WebOS though.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by bulls96 View Post
    NEED FLASH!

    if they could get flash working already and make palm phones able to play farmville, cafe world, etc., then i could possibly see a gamechanger....

    hey, how more synergized can you get with facebook if you put facebook chat officially built in the messaging app?? tell me what more you have to synergize?

    Being the facebook phone is a BIG differentiating factor in the smartphone world.

    yea, if they become the "official' facebook phone, they would sell millions. But i don't want them to be bought by facebook, and have everything facebook related. I like how it is now, but improve the synergy. Add facebook chat in the messenger app, improve it for contacts. Like be able to sync spesific groups. Maybe if they where partially owned by facebook. So facebook gives them hundreds of millions, some developers, and others to speed up the process of adding features. Facebook also helps them advertise it as the "official facebook phone", and then they get a huge cut of the sales.


    I don't see this happening, unless facebook sees google, apple, and maybe even mircosoft as threats to their fanbase.

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