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  1.    #1  
    TreoCentral reports: "In an interesting discussion with a VoiceStream representative, they made it clear that the standard GPRS pricing would apply to the Treo when used on their GPRS network - $20 for 5 megabytes of transfer per month, and $5 per additional megabyte."

    This is indeed absurd. Without a flat-fee plan for always-on, unlimited e-mail, the Treo will never live up to its full potential. BlackBerry has it. The Palm i705 has it. The forthcoming Danger HipTop seemingly will have it (but maybe we're in for a surprise there, too). So why can't the Treo have it?

    If this is true, let's hope the CDMA version of the Treo (the "Sprint Treo 300") will be different and offer a flat-fee plan for always-on, unlimited e-mail. Any idea?
  2. #2  
    How about a mass phone/write in complaint to Voicestream.
    Tell them that you do not care for their absurd pricing policy on GPRS, and you will be sending back your 270 to Handspring within the 30 day period, and going with the competition.
    Last edited by larryk; 06/26/2002 at 09:46 AM.
  3. #3  
    It's not up to Handspring. Better complain to Voicestream. Will Cingular or AT&T (when they get their GMS network up) offer flatrate?
  4. vebix's Avatar
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    #4  
    I hope for that price we get free weekend packets (much like the current free weekend minutes). Otherwise on the weekends we'll be better off dialing up to an ISP to play around. Has anybody heard anything on this yet?

    - Matt
  5. #5  
    Otherwise on the weekends we'll be better off dialing up to an ISP to play around.
    I'm thinking of bypassing the whole GPRS thing myself. For me, it's easy enough to dial in to check email twice a day or so and for the occasional web access. If somebody needs to get ahold of me faster, they can always send an SMS or, gasp, even CALL me. Why pay VS even more?
    UniPalmer
    -------------
    It's not the heat; it's the stupidity!
  6. #6  
    Originally posted by UniPalmer
    I'm thinking of bypassing the whole GPRS thing myself. For me, it's easy enough to dial in to check email twice a day or so and for the occasional web access. If somebody needs to get ahold of me faster, they can always send an SMS or, gasp, even CALL me. Why pay VS even more?
    My sentiments exactly!

    While I'm interested in GPRS and will most likely give it a try, I believe my present plan provides me the most economical strategy for my present needs. We'll see.....
    Up the Creek.... Try the River!
    www.riverontheweb.com

    Moblog: bluefrog.textamerica.com
  7. #7  
    IMHO, $5 for 5-10 MB is reasonable. $20 is not.
  8. #8  
    I think I will use the $3 upgrade plan with voicestream, it's about 1 meg I think. Then the unit can be always on for maybe small mission critical stuff. Outside of that, any heavy surfing will be dial up for me. I assume you can still use GPRS or dial up on the same device?
  9. dbasham's Avatar
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    #9  
    I think something everyone needs to consider is the call initiation time (probably about 30 seconds) and the actually amount of time you spend online while waiting for replies, etc that all need to be considered in the total cost of going with a dial-up solution. Of course the speed will be higher on GPRS so you need to think about that to0.

    Since I have been using Blazer I have been disconnected after about 3-5 minutes (your mileage may vary) which of course costs be another re-connect time, etc. I don't think we can realistically expect more than about 20KByte per minute (if that, averaged out, say each call I get 75KByte for 5 minutes) which works out to about 70 minutes per MByte or 350 minutes for 5 MBtyes.

    Gosh I really did have to do the math to look at this more closely. On the 3000 minute plan (which I have) you pay about $1 per 60 minutes. So, 5 MBytes costs you about $6 versus $20 for GPRS. They defintely need to lower the price and I am sure that VoiceSteam has done the math as well. Is $14 more worth the ability to have a higher speed and always on. Not sure... Anyone have any more input on approximate KB/min and such???
    --Denny
  10. #10  
    I believe I read a column recently (don't have the reference...sorry!) that talked about wireless providers viewing packet data as their big source of income in coming years, and that talk time will be essentially given away as we transition to that model. Don't know how accurate that prediction is, but if true it doesn't bode well for $/MB coming down too much. My impression is that we had better get used to the idea of GPRS data costing significantly more than dialing up and using minutes. Part of that is justified by the added convenience; however at the current prices I think most of us agree that it's not worth it for all our data needs.

    My big concern with all this is that, especially if they're trying to make money off of packet data, the providers will cut off our ability to access data through dialup, thereby forcing us into GPRS (or whatever the CDMA equivalent might be). I know very little about the technical side of this, so I'm not even sure that's possible, but the problems some of us have had with VoiceStream's network indicate it might be possible - i.e., not being able to make data calls even though we could make voice calls, due to some problem with the "data channel" and VoiceStream's network.

    If that happens, I still have a combo phone/PDA that fits in my pocket...but I effectively don't have the email and web access that was advertised when I bought the phone. And I'm past my 30 days. So I will be VERY unhappy.

    Just my thoughts...
  11. #11  
    They won't completely cut off CSD connections until the GPRS support is ubiquitous. There are still a LOT of places that don't have GPRS support in their networks, leaving CSD connections as the only option. They're not about to **** off every techie and road warrior customer of theirs by cutting off CSD connections just to coerce people into GPRS service agreements.
    Similarly, this testifies to the fact that we WILL be able to continue making CSD calls even with the GPRS patch installed. I'm sure it will be just another way to connect to the net, and it will probably show up in the Network preferences as a special connection type. If your GPRS connection is chosen and connected, then that's what you'll be using. If wireless modem and a dialup ISP is chosen, then that's what you'll connect to when needed.
    Personally, I'm gonna switch to the "Talk & Text" plan (currently I'm on the Basic plan) to see how the GPRS thing even works. I might check e-mail a couple times, but I won't be doing any surfing without a way to track data transfers to keep from going over the limit and being bent-over by VoiceStream.
    I'm also quite sure that Sprint and other CDMA carriers will be similarly greedy with their 2.5 and 3G services. They think it's going to be a money maker, so they're going to milk it. Price will only come down if they think they can significatnly boost subscribers to the service.

    -Greg
    Seattle Palm Users Group!
    http://www.seapug.com/
  12. #12  
    Greg -

    I wasn't suggesting that Handspring's GPRS patch would affect CSD connections, more that at some point the carrier would stop allowing them. But you raise a good point - it is going to take quite a while for GPRS to take over and the carriers to have the serious option of cutting off CSD, and by that point I will probably be well beyond my service contract with VoiceStream and will have gotten quite a bit of use out of my Treo. So I can wait and see and cross that bridge when I get to it and whatever other turns of phrase you like.
  13. #13  
    one thing i hate right now about CSD is being unable to receive a call while online. gprs will change that and allow calls to come through.
    another thing, I've been using gprs since february on my t68 and I've never hit 1mb in a month. I did a lot of surfing and downloading backgrounds. since I won't be using the treo for massive web surfing or downloading files just quick lookups (checking email, mapquest, reading stories when I'm bored). I don't think I will be needing more than 3mb.
    lastly I use yahoo messenger a lot, I would love to be online most of the day to send quick messages (faster feedback than sms).

    this was posted with my treo.
  14. #14  
    start an online petition www.petitiononline.com

    Dave
  15. #15  
    http://www.petitiononline.com/treo/petition.html

    To: Voicestream
    "In an interesting discussion with a VoiceStream representative, they made it clear that the standard GPRS pricing would apply to the Treo when used on their GPRS network - $20 for 5 megabytes of transfer per month, and $5 per additional megabyte."

    This is indeed absurd. Without a flat-fee plan for always-on, unlimited e-mail, the Treo will never live up to its full potential. BlackBerry has it. The Palm i705 has it. So why can't the Treo have it?

    Voicestream hear our cries: We want flat-fee plans for our Treos.
  16. dbasham's Avatar
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    #16  
    I signed tbe petition. Come on folks there are only 3 names out there so far. I know that more people than that are interested in this. Even if you don't have a Treo yet but feel that this would be an important reason for you to get one please go out and sign. Thanks,
    --Denny

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